Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Well, the folks at Enfield were very nice, but they only do hidem in leather. I did find someone at SMS who finally agreed to do it for a rather exorbitant price, but it looks like I don't have a choice at this point.
  2. I'm not sure a 200 mile drive in an unknown car fresh off the transport truck is a good idea. Maybe you've gone and seen the car and driven it, but if not, the condition of the wiring, electronics and the motor and tranny themselves may be in question. Don't get me wrong, as far as I'm concerned these old cars are for one thing and one thing only - driving! But if you are going to make such a drive, make sure you have a good set of tools, an owner's manual (the old Chrysler manuals are almost like a shop manual), a new set of points and maybe a spare battery. Check the brakes (they will be hydraulic) - check the fittings and hoses for leaks and check the backing plates for any signs of leaking from the cylinders. Check the wiring for fraying, exposed or loose wires. Also, check the tires for any fatigue, dry rot or cracks. Make sure the gas in the tank is still good - modern gas goes bad very quickly, you can usually tell by the smell if there's trouble. I'm actually not a worry wort, but I've been on enough "first drives" to know what can happen. You've got a great car, enjoy!
  3. Friartuck, check out my restoration thread here: http://forums.aaca.org/f143/ressurection-daphne-1932-dl-348459.html This should give you plenty of info.
  4. Beautiful job, Ian! I do have one question - it looks like you wrapped the green tape around the edges of the top insert, although I may be misinterpreting the photo. Once you applied the mastic and let it set up, how did you get the tape off without messing up the mastic? It seems it would be into the slot and removing the tape would tear the mastic. Obviously that didn't happen, so what am I missing? Edit: Looking more closely at the photos, maybe you didn't wrap the tape completely around the edge of the insert, but only up to the edge of it. That would explain things. What brand of mastic did you use?
  5. I sure hope so. I must say I'm happy so far. Still a long way to go to make it by next June and the 100th, but we're trying.
  6. I headed over to Crin at Undercover Upholstery and Paint to see how the fenders were coming. He now has the final primer coat on over the Evercoat Slick Sand spray filler he used to level everything out. He didn't have to use any conventional body filler on any of the fenders. You can see the guide coat on the fenders in some of the pictures. He thought he might spay on the basecoat/clearcoat today, but he discovered a slight wave in a couple of places on the front fenders and added a bit more Slick Sand and is continuing the sanding. I'm glad he's such a perfectionist, as black will show every wave and tiny flaw. The difference in the fenders compared to the first day I saw them is simply astonishing. Check out these before and after pictures - and this is before a little more work and the final paint. I can't wait to see them in shiny black!
  7. Ed also finished up the driver's side lower hood section that had been badly damaged in the ice fall mentioned earlier. This was no easy job - a basically flat panel that had to be made perfectly flat once again. The original damage was ugly and extended much further than we originally thought. The bottom of the panel was also buckled and had caused the damage done to the base of the fender we had to repair earlier. I was lucky and found perfect top hood section. As far as I know, it will be the only body part not original to the car, but the amount of work to get the old one right was prohibitively expensive. Ed did his usual magic and got everything back into line. He spent a lot of time on the raised trim around the louvers and the louvers themselves, which were bent every which way. Getting the hinges straight was no easy task, either, but the part is now ready to take to the painter.
  8. Unfortunately, it wasn't just the outer panel that needed attention. The next step will be to replace the rusted out inside section below the doors. This is an easy part to make since it is basically flat with a few access holes. Once the rust areas are replaced, the outer section will be removed and new outer section we made in the last post will be installed. The inner driver's side is all good and will remain. The outer side has a few small holes that can be welded up and a rusted through section that will be filled with a patch. No need to make a full lower part on this side. The rear of the body also needs some help. This is a double-wall area, which causes some problems. Ed will have to remove the rusted section visible in the picture, repair some damage to the layer under it, then prime that layer, then weld in a new section to replace what he removed. He always primes under double sections to prevent rust from returning. After all the metal is replaced, Ed will sandblast everything again and then use a spray wand through the access holes to coat the inside of the panels with epoxy primer. He'll then spray the exterior with epoxy primer to seal everything. He is very conscientious about preventing any rust from returning.
  9. My wife Kathy and I spent last Saturday at Ed's watching him make the lower section of the body that needed replacement. It was Swiss cheese and had to go. In watching the process, we discovered that careful planning, thinking ahead, and exact measurements are necessary for a good job. Ed began by taking measurements of the panel to be replaced. He discovered that it curved on both the horizontal and vertical axis. Getting the correct curve was critical, so he hauled out his curve templates and determined the correct arc in both directions. We all have a rack of curve templates in our workshops...right? Anyway, Ed noticed that the front horizontal curve was different the the rear part of the curve so he had to clamp a 12 degree radius to a 15 degree radius to get the correct compound curve. With that problem solved, he cut out the proper shape from a large sheet of steel and bent it about a third of the way in to a 90 degree angle. Then he went to work shaping the piece - first getting the correct curve in one direction using this foot operated machine. It took a lot of time and work, shaping, then walking over and comparing it to the templates, more shaping and more comparing. Finally, he had the curve correct. But this shaping process distorted the piece and it was now necessary to hammer it back to the correct shape and introduce the other curve using this device. This baby was loud and the earphones were a real necessity. Once the curves were correct (more comparing to the templates), Ed went to the PullMax to hammer in the profile of the part. He had made a template directly from the body to start with. Then he ground these forms from a single hunk of steel to match the correct profile. This is no easy job as you have to know how much to round the corners and smooth the surface so the dies will form the metal to the exact shape needed. With the dies installed on the machine, Ed slowly formed the profile, making eight or nine passes, letting the machine work at its own pace. Now Ed used still another machine to bend a perfect 90 degree angle in the part. This also took about nine passes to make it perfect. Ed says you have to ease the metal into shape, and working too fast can ruin the job. The final process was to score the part so it could be bent 180 degrees to form the welding bracket on the bottom. A lot of work, but the final results were amazing.
  10. Well, I lost about a page and a half of posts thanks to the recent hack. Let's see if I can remember what I posted. I spent an evening doing one the the hundreds of "little" jobs necessary to finish any restoration. This one involved the bell housing. It was a greasy. oily mess. It was so covered with stuck on road grit that it was impossible to figure out what was what - everything just looked like a shapeless blob. Luckily, all the oil had kept the sealed inside pretty clean. I sprayed everything with foam engine cleaner, waited ten minutes and broke out the power washer. Other than the fact I need to lose some weight, the picture shows how effective the washer is in removing the crud. Everything came out nice and clean. And even better news, I miked the clutch fork shaft and there was no wear. A new set of bushings and I should be ready to go. Now just a wire brushing (I saved a sample of the paint for my paint shop to match) and cleaning, and then a coat of epoxy primer and shiny gray paint.
  11. Thanks, I'll give them a call.
  12. I was told by a large fabric and upholstery supplier that they could sew up some hidem piping if I supplied the fabric. Now, after buying all the welting and the raw fabric to match, they tell me they can't, or rather, won't make the hidem. I've searched the net for DIY instructions on making it and have had no success. My wife is a wiz at the sewing machine, but all I can find is instructions for "double welting" rather than hidem. Any upholstery experts out there with either instructions or someone who can or will make it up for me if I supply the fabric? Thanks, RT
  13. Are you sure that the contact piece in the socket itself hasn't turned or come loose? I have had a few sockets where the tabs that held the fiber piece with the contacts attached had broken off and the piece turned inside the socket. Don't know if yours are made that way or not.
  14. My 29 Plymouth had some thin material just like the stuff they use on frame to body insulation. A thin, woven material that was glued on to the wood. It wasn't all over, just in a few strategic spots.
  15. This is what you need. Not sure of the quality of this one, but it looks like this. Don't get a cheap look-alike, it will break. Hub Puller Old Forge 2519 | eBay
  16. I checked Harnesses Unlimited and they don't carry a harness for a 32 Dodge. Both Y and Z and Rhode Island Wiring have them with RI being somewhat less expensive. I bought my harness for my 48 Plymouth from RI and was very happy with the product. I talked to Rhode Island Wiring this morning and they will do the looming for $4.50 a foot plus a $7.00 set up charge. They were very helpful on the phone. So, now I have to decide whether to go with a completed harness or try a partial DIY and let them do the looming.
  17. Thanks Friartuck. I actually write and direct videos, so I'm very familiar with gaff tape. I'm not sure how it would hold up under the elements. It's designed to peel away without leaving any sticky residue and I'm not really sure of its staying power. I'll run a few tests and see what happens as I have a roll of the cloth-based black tape handy.
  18. Yeah, that's what I was afraid off. Building a wiring loom machine is beyond my pay grade I'm afraid.
  19. I started on the wiring today on my 1932 Dodge DL and immediately ran into a new problem. (Seems like there is one a day lately!) All of the wiring harness is neatly encased in a nicely made woven loom. Rhode Island Wiring has looms of different sizes, so I thought I would be alright. as usual, WRONG! The loom seems to have been woven OVER the wiring harness after it was put together. The problem is, where the loom joints off into smaller offshoot looms, the connection is woven together. It's these connections that have me baffled. How can I joint the two different loom sizes seamlessly as the factory did it. I have a feeling the answer is - I CAN'T! In these pictures you can see how the various looms join together. I brought up the levels so you can see the pattern of the loom threads. Notice the loom actually expands in one area. Where the loom branches off into a Y it looks like the two smaller looms may be jammed into the larger one. I don't know how much the loom will stretch, and I might be able to pull that off, but where the smaller loom comes out of the larger at about a 90 degree angle really has me stumped. All the other harnesses I've done have had cloth tape wrapped around the harness. This is the first one with looms like this. Leave it to Dodge Brothers to give you a quality job in 1932 rather than saving a few pennies per wiring job. But it leaves me in a quandary. Any loom experts out there with a solution? I'd call Rhode Island wiring, but it's the holiday weekend and I doubt they have an answer other than taping up the joins.
  20. I started on the wiring today and immediately ran into a new problem. (Seems like there is one a day lately!) All of the wiring harness is neatly encased in a nicely made woven loom. Rhode Island Wiring has looms of different sizes, so I thought I would be alright. as usual, WRONG! The loom seems to have been woven OVER the wiring harness after it was put together. The problem is, where the loom joints off into smaller offshoot looms, the connection is woven together. It's these connections that have me baffled. How can I joint the two different loom sizes seamlessly as the factory did it. I have a feeling the answer is - I CAN'T! In these pictures you can see how the various looms join together. I brought up the levels so you can see the pattern of the loom threads. Notice the loom actually expands in one area. Where the loom branches off into a Y it looks like the two smaller looms may be jammed into the larger one. I don't know how much the loom will stretch, and I might be able to pull that off, but where the smaller loom comes out of the larger at about a 90 degree angle really has me stumped. All the other harnesses I've done have had cloth tape wrapped around the harness. This is the first one with looms like this. Leave it to Dodge Brothers to give you a quality job in 1932 rather than saving a few pennies per wiring job. But it leaves me in a quandary. Any loom experts out there with a solution? I'd call Rhode Island wiring, but it's the holiday weekend and I doubt they have an answer other than taping up the joins.
  21. Dave, I too grew up in Detroit and my dad also worked for GM for 40 years. We grew up with GM cars and all my new cars have been GM products. But, for some reason, all my old cars have been Mopars, starting with a 1932 Dodge DL that I bought in college and just found and bought back this year. My other Mopars were a 1929 Plymouth Model U, a 1948 Plymouth P-15, a 1950 Dodge Wayfarer sedan and a 1950 Dodge Wayfarer roadster. I remember my wife and I driving up from St. Louis, Missouri to Burchills in Port Huron, Michigan in 1973 to by parts for the 29. They had a full set of NOS hubcaps for the wood wheels, a NOS tail light and many other goodies right on the shelves. I wish it was that easy with my current 32. Those were the days.
  22. I sold her years ago, but as I remember, my 29 Model U had a black engine with a silver head, black firewall (not sure about that, I seem to remember some discussion about whether it should be black or body color), black generator, starter, and distributor. I think the 28 models were the same. You might check the Plymouth threads and ask there.
  23. To quote Obi-wan Kenobi: "Anakin, how many times have I told you to stay away from the power couplings." A very interesting little film. You learn something every day. My problem is I usually forget it by tomorrow.
  24. 32bizcoupe, I just went to my local glass shop. They will cut (and polish the edges) new laminated glass for me based on my old windows - which I'll bring in to them. Just make sure your glass shop has glass the correct thickness. At least you have a coupe! I have eight pieces of glass to deal with. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  25. I will. Looks like pretty thick steel, however. There could be a problem bending something that thick. I suspect the part was originally stamped.