hursst

1960 MGA Restoration

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It's sieved twice when I recycle it, but you're probably right, there are some pieces that get in that are larger than the fine media.

 

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Another thought: is there any electrostatic charge built up in the media during spraying that may cause them to bridge in the machine? I am thinking of + and - charges on opposite ends of the particles and the repulsion between + charges and attraction between - charges and whether that could contribute to bridging?

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I think the basic problem is the Clogmaster 2000 was designed to clog.  I know that when I first tried a syphon gun (Crapmaster 150) in a cabinet it was terrible, it could hardly pick up any media.  I later got a nice syphon gun from TP Tools and the difference was incredible... mind you the rest of the system was unchanged.  The only problem I had with it was the nozzles wore out super fast.  TP Tools sold carbide nozzles for just under $450,000 (which I thought was expensive) but I've using the same nozzle for over 2 years.   Out of curiosity (boredom more likely) I took the two guns apart and compared them.  While the TP Tools gun had larger diameter passage ways, the biggest difference was were the passageway changed directions it was a nice radius whereas the Crapmaster 150 would have a 90 turn.   The Clogmaster 2000 probably has twice the number of fittings that would need the same attention to detail in the design that likely didn't happen.  I have an similar model of the Clogmaster and I took it apart (OK, I'll admit, it clogged one time too many and I beat it to pieces with a baseball bat) and it looked to me that the bottom 'T' fitting was probably where the main problem was.  It seemed that one might be able to replace all the various fittings with larger diameter and it would work better.   By this time, however, I had the TP Tool syphon gun and I just stuck the feed hose in a bucket and blasted away outside. 

 

Chris: What paint are you using on the chassis parts?  I really like the sheen.

 

 

 

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Great work, love watching this sort of process! Thats a terrific bearing puller you have, and some very  imaginative uses of the local flora. Maybe I missed it, but have you had the relined rear brake shoes radiused to suit the drums? Can be very helpful to getting good contact over the whole shoe, without high spots.

jp 26 Rover 9

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My Clogmaster is clogging at the bottom T.  The gun I have works great.  I don't have many more huge parts, so I'll probably just live with it for now.

 

I am using Eastwood Extreme Chassis Black Satin Finish from a spray can.  It seems to be the closest to what the factory did, and it looks good and should be durable.  I considered powder coating, but I am more concerned with lowering my expenses and doing as much of the car as I can myself.

 

Thanks jp928.  I've been trying to cheap out, as my last restoration, I farmed out more of it, and it cost me a fortune.  Lots of rip-off artists out there, so I figure I will attempt to do almost everything myself.  As far as the rear brake shoes, I had them relined by White Post Restorations, but I'm not sure if they were radiused.  I've had them do shoes on my other cars and never had a problem, so I'm not concerned with it.

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20 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

TP Tools sold carbide nozzles for just under $450,000 (which I thought was expensive) but I've using the same nozzle for over 2 years.

 

LoL! That would be a bit pricey. They seem to be $49 at the moment for a nozzle set?

http://www.tptools.com/Skat-Blast-Carbide-Nozzle-Pack,287.html

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11 minutes ago, Spinneyhill said:

 

LoL! That would be a bit pricey. They seem to be $49 at the moment for a nozzle set?

http://www.tptools.com/Skat-Blast-Carbide-Nozzle-Pack,287.html

Yep, that's the set, though I paid the full price, no special when I ordered mine. :) It seemed like the end of the world when I purchased them mainly because the plain steel nozzles didn't last more than a couple of hours.  At the time I had no idea there was that big a difference. They mentioned one carbide was 30x longer than a ceramic but I was using the plain steel ones at the time.  I didn't realize that the ceramic was way better than plain steel and thus the carbide was nearly infinitely better than the plain steel.  :)

 

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Most places that reline shoes will radius them in the price if you take the drums along...

jp 26 Rover 9

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Some progress to report, time for a small update.  I finished the front chassis extension and the two ancillary bumper brackets on the sides.  I also added the horn bracket and a repro horn (Photo 1).  The original horn is an unusable wreck.  I determined that the original flex fuel line going to the carbs was in good enough condition to be saved.  No clogs, cracks, or anything.  I polished up the brass and steel fittings and it looks almost new (Photos 2 & 3).  It's now back on the car.   I refurbished the original steering U-joint and put it on the steering shaft (Photo 4).  Last, I set up the original cleaned-up battery wire with a repro wiring harness and the associated refurbished clips and hardware (Photo 5).  I have to bend the hanger tangs on the chassis back into place a little, then this assembly is ready for installation on the chassis.

 

Still have more details to go, such as the front and rear wiring harness, the other battery wires and clamps, the rest of the tools I have left, the brake pipe from the master cylinder, then I think I can put in the rear floorboards and rear driveshaft tunnel.  Not too much left to go on the rolling chassis.  After these last pieces, I'll be starting on the engine.  Next steps will be a distributor rebuild, then I'm going to try to tackle the SU carbs.  I have no experience with carbs, so it will be interesting.  Will be getting a rebuild kit and a book for starters.

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It is looking good, reminds me of the TR3A  I did about 30 years ago.

If your like your shins you should put a piece of rubber hose on those frame ends.

Merrill

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SU carbs are simple and easy to overhaul, with the right parts. Lots of docs on how/what/when. The original Smiths on my Rover was very unreliable, so I have resorted to an SU - HS2 (1-1/4") off a Mini - $20. $100 kit from Burlens (UK) - new spindle, butterfly, jet, needle&seat (rubber tipped type, much more reliable), bowl gasket, and I added new brass screws. Also comes with new bushes for the spindle if the body is badly worn - mine wasnt. Car now runs well, and answers throttle very smoothly. I set the jet height per the rebuild notes at the default, and she fired up first try.

Check your needles for wear, you may need new ones - the code is stamped on the shank. If the floats are brass, check for leaks. Critical part of rebuild is centreing the jet. You will need light oil for the dampers, as in sewing machine - engine oil is far too heavy. I verified my mixture using a wide band O2 sensor, jsut to be sure.

Keep up the good work.

jp 26 Rover 9

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Been a while since my last update, but have made more slow progress.  I'm pretty much finished with the complete chassis at this point (the parts I can do without the engine and trans installed).  I installed the chassis and rear wiring harness, clips, and fasteners.  Here are the rear connectors freshly installed (Photo 1). 

 

For some reason, I'm limited to 9.77MB of photos this time, which is strange, so I can only do 3 photos. (???!)

 

I was also going to go to the Carlisle import nationals today, but the monsoon made me just go into work instead.

 

I finished the brake and fuel pipes at the front.  I restored the drive shaft.  Got new U-joints and was able to clean everything else up, including getting the sliding front pinion properly lubed and working.  It's currently finished and at a shop getting balanced.  Here it is about 1/2 way finished (Photo 2).  I blasted and painted the rear drive shaft tunnel, then got the rear floorboards out and drilled the fastener holes and the seat mounting holes.  I discovered 1 welded-on nut for the floorboards is missing, so not sure what I'll do about that.  I have the nut, but welding it on with the chassis finished and no lift may be a bridge too far.  The wood still needs to be treated, I'm going to try some wood preservative of some type, and then they will need to be painted black.  They are loosely installed in the car (Photo 3) as it's a good place for them, but can't screw them down until the front trans tunnel is in, and can't do that until the trans is in, and don't want to do that until the engine is in, so it will be a while.

 

I still have to find one battery clip and I have to finish restoring the battery cables and fasteners, which appear to just need a good cleaning.  I have a few more tools I want to restore as well, but that should be quite easy, just blast and paint.  Finding the time to do these things is another story.

 

So, I will start shopping for a transmission shop next week, then start on the rest of the engine components, starting with the distributor, then the carbs, then the intake manifold, then the air cleaners, and then a few misc brackets, tubes, and whatnot, and everything for the engine should be done, except the engine block and guts itself.  After that, I'm going to try an MG engine guy in Richmond and I'm going to try to have all of this finished by the end of 2018.  I hope to complete the body in 2019, then have the whole car finished in 2020.  Press on...

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Looks fantastic!  Where did you get your wire harness?  What kind of plywood is that for the floorboards?  Looks really nice.

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Thanks.  I got both thru Moss.  Not sure what type of wood the plywood is, but it seems nice and in the spirit of the originals.

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Now that the chassis is complete, it's time to move on to the engine and transmission.  I started by dragging out the transmission (photo 1).  It was covered in about 1" of oil mixed with sand.  After cleaning up the top of the trans, I found "MI6" written on it (photo 2).  Must have been James Bond's MGA.  As per my last posting, I'm limited to 9.77mb of photos for some reason, so I can only post 2.  I must have hit some type of limit, as I know before I could post more, and other folks have been able to post more.

 

I'm not sure if I'll try to mess with the trans internals myself or not, but I'll probably farm it out and have a pro look it over, as I've only done minimal trans work.  I was able to clean off most of the gunk and it looks pretty good now, but will require another round of cleaning to be acceptable.

 

I then moved on to the distributor.  Took it all apart, but at the end, I discovered that the weights and springs, although free and loose, would not move at all.  It completely defied the laws of physics as there appeared to be nothing keeping them from being able to move in their full range of motion.  I also discovered that the top cam portion of the main shaft has seized to the shaft and will not come off.  I tried penetrating fluid, then lots of heat, but nothing worked.  I ended up bending the base plate trying to get the thing off, so it's ruined.  I don't feel too bad, as it was ruined anyway.  No way to get the weights off or get them moving.  I bought a used '61 distributor from ebay and I will try to put the guts of that one into my original case to try to keep it as original as possible.  I have a strange feeling that the one I bought will end up doing the same thing.  I also feel that I'm missing something about how these things work.  You don't know what you don't know.

 

I ordered some wood sealant fore the floorboards.  This is the Steve Smith stuff as recommended on Barney's MGA Guru site.  Actually talked to THE Steve Smith, so I think I'll be getting some great wood sealant that should protect from moisture and rot for quite a long time.  I also finished restoring the seat mounting fasteners, so those will be ready to go in when the time comes.

 

I still have the jack handles and engine crank handle to restore, so I've been doing that one the side.  I continue to try to find original tools online when I can, as to try to rebuild a complete tool set.  Unfortunately, all these tools seem to be in the UK, which means the shipping costs are making this cost-prohibitive.  Trying to build my own set, not pay $300-$500 to buy a set from someone that's already put a set together, but that may be the smarter financial choice after considering foreign shipping costs.

 

-Chris

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On your photo of the steering U joint it almost looks like you bead blasted it. Not that good an idea if you did as grit gets in and mixes with the grease . Accelerated wear will be the result. Those joints last a long time if kept greased, however grit will definitely shorten life. Otherwise things are looking great.

 

Greg in Canada

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Greg, thanks for the concern.  I did not blast it.  It was on the car when I bought it.  Not grease fittings, though, not sure if it is original.

 

 I inspected it and it seemed tight, but had good freedom of movement, so I wire-wheeled it, then dremelled the interior portions to clean it all up.  I gave it multiple cleanings, then I primed and painted it steel silver.  Put on new snap rings, too.  Not quite factory perfect, but wanted to keep it as original as possible and protect the metal.  Turned out pretty good cosmetically.  I figure since it's a steering joint and I won't be driving the wheels off of it, it should be okay.

 

-Chris

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I have very little time at the moment, but I've been working on the distributor and took it apart quite easily, but couldn't get off the cam assembly from the top of the main shaft.  Tried heating, prying, Liquid Wrench, but nothing worked and I ended up damaging the shaft in the process, so I purchased another partial distributor on ebay to use for parts.  Like anything, I found out what I did wrong after I ruined it, so lesson learned.  I've been piecing it back together and so far so good (Photo 1).  Just got new points and waiting on a condenser.

 

Polished up the firing order tag.  Nice brass piece, cleaned up well (Photos 2 & 3).  Looks better than photo 3 after a quick polish with the dremel tool.

 

Still working on the tools that came with the car, so only have to paint the engine crank, then restore the tire pump.  The jack handle assemblies have been restored.  Found a set of Dunlop tire irons in the UK, so I'm slowly piecing together the missing tools.  

 

I picked up some special wood sealant/primer from a specialist, so if I can find the time, I'll be sealing the floorboards with this stuff, then painting them, then putting in the seat mounting fasteners that attach to the bottom of the floorboards.  

 

Next is doing a final cleanup of the transmission, which means undoing all the bolts one at a time and cleaning around the holes.  Right now, all the gunk is congregated around the bolt areas, so they will need some additional cleaning help.  I dropped off the shifter at Paul's Chrome in Evans City, PA for replating.  Shouldn't be too much longer before I can take it to the transmission shop.  After that, I'll start the carbs and intake, then I should have most of the ancillary engine parts finished and it will be ready to send to the engine rebuilder.  The goal is to have the engine and trans restored and in the car by the end of the year.  Not sure if I will make it with having almost no time and running in to many small, difficult challenges, since I've never messed with a distributor or carb before.

 

 

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Try checking out this site for how the mechanical advance works...

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=distributor+centrifugal+advance&safe=active&rlz=1C1GGGE_enAU693AU693&biw=1600&bih=769&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=6efh4YGN9Yx9BM%3A%2C1soo29qmQFdl4M%2C_&usg=__AHn1NifFomDLLpi-E3T5RLGiY9o%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjKl6KYitDbAhXBy7wKHcV7CjEQ9QEIODAA#imgrc=6efh4YGN9Yx9BM:

This part rotates the make/break cam  forwards, while the vacuum advance moves the whole plate that the points are mounted on. Some cars also run a vacuum retard , as in my Porsche 928.

You did find the screw under the rotor button that retains the advance stuff on the main shaft?

I once had a mini that had been little used for a while and one day would not go much faster than walking pace - the mechanical advance plate was frozen onto the main shaft. If you know the Lucas part no for the car you can lookup the advance curve it should produce. Most such distributors do a simple straight line advance which is finished by ~3500rpm, maybe up to 30-35Deg.  

jp 26 Rover 9

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Thanks, I'm on the right track, now.  Have all the parts and most of it reassembled, just need the condenser before I shore it up.  On to the carburetors next.

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Last time I worked on a twin carb car (Rover 2000TC, 2 x 2" SU HD8), part of the final set up involved setting the clearance of the connection from the rear carb (directly connected to the throttle linkage) and the front carb - some is needed to ensure the front one returned to its idle stop. The specified clearance was given as being able to just run a roll your own cigarette paper through the gap. 

jp 26 Rover 9

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Hi Hursst,

 

I've just seen all your restoration.  Very good job and very interesting picture for me. 

It is funny because we are doing almost the same, but far away from you as I live in Belgium.

I'm a lillte bit further than you.

The engine is on the chassis, but still need to clean and install carburettors and distributor.

I also will need a new exhaust manifold as mine is cracked, and the fuel tank is to be replaced as it is rusted and leaking.

Here is a picture of the engine fitting on the frame.

engine-on-chassisRH.JPG

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Nice project, looks great!  I ended up with a broken exhaust manifold and rusty gas tank as well.  I bought used replacements, but holding on to the broken pieces in case there's any chance they can be repaired in the future.  Hate to waste any part that may be of use somehow.  I should be where you are in about 6 months, with any luck.  Thanks for the post!

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Got a good 1/2 day straight working today.  Trying to do 1 hour a day on weekdays, then as much as possible on weekends, if I'm in town.

 

Finished restoring the tools that came with the car and the few tools I bought since then (Photo 1).  Will be slowly finding the rest of the tools over time.  Good side project while working on the main parts of the car.

 

Bought some high-tech wood sealer from a specialist in California.  Works as a wood sealer and primer and was recommended on the MGA blogs I read.  Looks great and should perform as I would expect.  Will need at least 2 days to dry and cure, then I can paint it the correct black and install the seat mounting hardware (Photo 2).

 

Started and completely the intake manifold.  It's really simple, just some aluminum piping, really.  Stripped it of the few drops of original paint that were left, cleaned all the grime off it, primed it and painted it as original.  Also zinc plated the nuts and bolts to the same.  Just need some new gaskets.

 

Also broke out the carburetor assembly.  Started at the top with the air cleaner lids.  Here's one stripped to bare metal and the other as it came with the car (Photo 3).  Should have these primed and painted tomorrow.

 

Otherwise, I'm currently shopping for a transmission shop and engine rebuilder.  A buddy of mine has some good local contacts, so should be visiting those guys as early as next week.  Hope to have the engine and trans complete and in the car by Christmas or earlier, so I can start on the body for 2019.  I think I'm on a 5-year track; 2 years in so far.  Taking a long time because it's hard to find time to work on it, and I want to get it as accurate as possible, with great attention to detail, which takes lots of extra time.

 

 

 

 

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