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Locomobile and Riker Truck Gathering Place

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Here is your place to discuss, locate and network with other owners of these fine workhorse trucks from a bygone era.  Post pictures, ask questions and help one another.

Al

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Does anyone know, were the Locomobile  and Riker trucks built and marketed at the same time?  I see a source on  EBAY that has some original Riker literature from the time period of 1917.

Al

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I have studied a bit regarding the 1917 Riker worm drive truck sales literature currently for sale on EBAY.  Riker was quite a truck, muscular for sure.  If you have a Riker truck, this piece of literature would sure be a nice addition to you collection!  If I had truck pieces, I would certainly be on this EBAY auction.

Al

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For those interested in earlier Riker truck original advertisements.  EBAY has a couple of new listings.

Al

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What is the funnest thing you have done in your Locomobile/Riker truck or simply being near a Locomobile?  Post here with any pictures you may have so we can all enjoy.

Al

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This may not be Riker truck but is definitely Riker and 1898 to boot!  A good write-up is found on the Dragone website and on the HCCA forum "Auto's for sale".  Check it out, what a piece of Americana.  This car is being sold at a big west coast auction.  It will be interesting to learn what it sells for,  and where it will be going next.

Al

image.png.c1e6369902da306d4e5c586600394439.png

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(That RIker, pictured above, is the things dreams are made of!)

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I was looking on ebay yesterday and there was a great photo for sale  of a quartermaster's yard at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas with a row of 10 Locomobile trucks on the left..........and 20 Peerless trucks on the right.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Hello Jeff,

Are you able to post a copy of the picture you refer to above?  Maybe we can help out the EBAY seller find a buyer for his picture.

Al

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Believe it or not, it's just an old postcard. Who would make a postcard of a bunch of old trucks? I guess the answer is it's not a bunch of old trucks, it's a new technology. After a couple of centuries of horses lugging everything around in the military; supplies, men, cannons; they are just starting to be replaced.

 

Took awhile to find, but here it is: 

F/S by "foundation*antiques" seller, VT, USA, price: $25.00

s-l1600.jpg

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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If only these trucks hadn't driven off into the sunset. I read a report from The Front from a transportation captain a century ago who said that his motorpool started out with heavy trucks from 5 different manufacturers, and after a year only the Peerlesses remained. No one is alive who can remember it, but it's also written that the Peerless trucks changed the tactics of the German military during the Great War. QF 3-inch 20 cwt - Mk I gun on Mk IV mounting on Peerless 4 ton lorry, WWI.............Hundreds were equipped with 13-pounder AA guns, manned by Royal Naval Air Service crews, and forced German reconnaissance planes to stay above 10,000 feet. Here is a Mark I gun in service on a Peerless TC-4 lorry, Wikipedia photo.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Thanks for posting Jeff.  Do you have an idea how many Peerless trucks may have survived?  Unfortunately, this big brute trucks were mostly considered scrap iron after the "Great War".  I was lucky enough to own most of a Packard 5 ton of the WW1 vintage, but have never run across a Locomobile, Riker or Peerless.  If you run  across other WW1 vintage information , please post.

Al

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GreatWarTruck and Blastermike here on the forums are the authorities on that.

 

An agent for the War Department(Britain) showed up in the States and more or less wrote a ticket for a 12,000-unit purchase of Peerless trucks about 1914, so the Brits got most of them. A chassis converted into a sheep hauling wagon turned up in Kansas or Montana a few years ago, then disappeared. 15 years ago, there was a complete 1914 Peerless truck in the Sierra Mountains, a town called Quincy, CA, but it and the owner, Richard Egbert, have vanished. No one here on the AACA Forums is from that area, so the truck is pretty well hidden for now, whatever happened to it.

 

As Tim and Mike could tell you, there are some survivors on the other side of the pond. Sandstone Estates, an agriculture, railroad, and vehicle museum in South Africa, has one that still runs. In Ireland and the U.K. there are a few frames, 2 Peerless Armoured Cars, one chassis with a plywood armoured car body used in a Liam Neeson/Julia Roberts film, one truck at a clay quarry museum found under some rubble, 1 being restored by GreatWarTruck, and a Condition #1 TC-4 restored by Richard Flynn as a beer cartage truck. A friend of mine, David Baird, offered to fly me to the UK for the Bonhams auction when all of Richard Flynn's vehicles were sold so I could bid on it. We decided not to follow through on that due to not deep enough pockets. Wise choice: the billionaire movie producer who took it home with him could have outbid us even if I had offered one million pounds. I'll see if I can drag a piccie of the little truck here so you can see what the attraction was.   

post-93154-0-96083400-1448291695_thumb.jpg

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Hell no, went straight to New Zealand. When you buy a ticket to "Lord of the Rings" you help pay for it.

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Here is an on-going thread on  WW1 Peerless undergoing restoration in the UK. Steve and his Dad have done fantastic work! They just finished

a wonderful WW1 Thornycroft. Both threads are worth reading. Before diving into the Thronycroft thread a big mug of your favorite relaxing

beverage and some snack food close at hand is strongly advised.

 

WW1 Peerless Lorry Restoration

 

WW1 Thronycroft Lorry Restoration

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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I just purchased this photo from an EBAY vendor.  Study and share your thoughts on the year, size and model of this Locomobile truck shown in action.

Al

$_57.jpg

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I just noticed what I think is the chain drive cover....hmmmm.  Looks to be a short wheelbase rig.  I wonder if a search of Pa. Power records could provide any sure information on what this truck is?

Al

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I just received this above picture today from the EBAY vendor I bought it from.  I am not disappointed!  It is the right size to frame  and hang along side some other factory photos of Locomobile cars.

Al

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That Locomobile truck is loaded to the teeth!  Looks like it also has a homemade "heat-houser" to keep some engine heat moving back to the driver and co driver.  It would be nice to have more information on that truck.

Al

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Al,  That truck must be over in jolly old England.  I would like to see the truck the fellow in the back ground is sitting on....I wonder what it is?  More information on the pictured truck would be great if anyone here knows anything?  It also looks like a truck is hiding in the garage, more questions!

Al

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Can anyone here put me in touch with some of our early truck friends on the other side of the pond, (shown above)?

Al

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