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Locomobile and Riker Truck Gathering Place


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OK. In November 1916 the name of the truck was changed from Locomobile to Riker. Apart from the electrical system there was not much of a change in the vehicle but the badges changed and the name on the radiator and the seat box were obvious ones. That first photo (in private ownership post war in France) has a Locomobile badge and what appears to be a Riker radiator - although for a very short period the name Locomobile name did appear on the finned radiator (although photos of these are very rare). US Army went to war on April 6th 1917 although 67 Locomobiles were used by the US Army on the Mexican border. US Army Rikers could not have started arriving in France until towards the end of 1917. We know that by 1st July 1918 that 603 had arrived out of a total of 1,351 which arrived in France for service with the US Army. The British used them as well of course and from very early on in the war although they were always referred to as Locomobiles and never Rikers.

 

When the US Army left almost all of their trucks were disposed of by selling to the French Government in France and to a British private consortium in Germany. British ones were taken back to Britain for disposal. The photo in private ownership must have come from US army stocks, yet why is it showing a Locomobile badge?   

Riker badge.png

Locomobile 33.jpg

Locomobile 19.jpg

Edited by Great War Truck (see edit history)
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Pierce Arrow?

British WD 1,705  All R Type

US army R Type 1,970 of which 1,365 arrived in France by the end of the war

US Army X Type 2,423 of which 534 arrived in France by the end of the war

French army. I dont have the figures but probably a couple of thousand of each

 

The French were the biggest user of the Pierce Arrow I am sure. There are several survivors over there.

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Lets deviate, for just a minute, away from Locomobile and Riker talk.  What is the difference between the Pierce-Arrow "R" type and the "X" type.  Do you know if the "R" and "X" were simply purchased as civilian models and served as military or were they built to a different standard for military use.  Actually the same question stands for Locomobile and Riker.  I see many more Pierce-Arrow trucks in the US than I even hear of Locomobile or Riker.

Al

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Yes, it is strange that so few Locomobiles survive. Pierce Arrows always seem to be turning up in France. The R type was designated as being able to carry five tons (but was used as a three tonner) while the X Type was a two tonner. I understand that both were built as civilian trucks and taken on by the military without change. Same as the Locomobile.

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Thanks for the "History" lesson on Locomobile, Riker and Pierce-Arrow.  I don't want to deviate too much from the subject matter of this thread, but I am on the scent of a WW-1 Pierce-Arrow truck project.  I do not know much yet, hopefully I will know more shortly.

Al

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Hello Mike,

I have not been to any of the larger truck museums so I can't speak of surety about how many Denby trucks are in the US.  In fact I know next to nothing about that make.  Refresh my memory, what model Pierce-Arrow are you building?

Regards,

Alan

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Hi AL, my pierce arrow is a 1926 XA 2 ton model, these were made from 23 to 28 approxx there were 2 and 3 ton trucks that had the same mechanicals 

i have only just found a set of front wheels and some other parts i needed to get my truck back to original condition, 

mike

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Hello Mike,

I have learned to "never say never" when it comes to looking for obscure parts.  Good for you on the parts acquisition for your Pierce-Arrow.  Are you getting enough pieces to proceed with your restoration or are you still tangled up with other truck restorations?  I am hopeful to hit the mother lode of Riker truck parts!  Sadly, not yet!

Al

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I wish you all a Merry Christmas and Happy new Year.  This season always gets me to thinking about and appreciating the sacrifices made by our fore fathers to preserve the liberties and lifestyle that we now enjoy in this modern world.  Those winter times, during WW-1 and WW-2 must have been brutal.  God bless those who made the supreme sacrifice.  Let us all do the best we can to make sure they are never forgotten.  Our interest in militaria, VIA this forum, is one small way we can keep the legacy and memory alive.  The restoration of a WW-1 vintage Riker truck helps me to appreciate those days gone by.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
clarity (see edit history)
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Hello Mike,

If I can track down enough pieces to build a Riker truck, I would dress it as a WW-1 work horse.  I also really enjoy the early vintage trucks and their involvement in the "Great War".  I like WW-2 stuff but not quite as much and currently have a civilian GMC dump truck that I still run.  That one is fun also.

Al

Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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