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Locomobile and Riker Truck Gathering Place


alsfarms
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OK. In November 1916 the name of the truck was changed from Locomobile to Riker. Apart from the electrical system there was not much of a change in the vehicle but the badges changed and the name on the radiator and the seat box were obvious ones. That first photo (in private ownership post war in France) has a Locomobile badge and what appears to be a Riker radiator - although for a very short period the name Locomobile name did appear on the finned radiator (although photos of these are very rare). US Army went to war on April 6th 1917 although 67 Locomobiles were used by the US Army on the Mexican border. US Army Rikers could not have started arriving in France until towards the end of 1917. We know that by 1st July 1918 that 603 had arrived out of a total of 1,351 which arrived in France for service with the US Army. The British used them as well of course and from very early on in the war although they were always referred to as Locomobiles and never Rikers.

 

When the US Army left almost all of their trucks were disposed of by selling to the French Government in France and to a British private consortium in Germany. British ones were taken back to Britain for disposal. The photo in private ownership must have come from US army stocks, yet why is it showing a Locomobile badge?   

Riker badge.png

Locomobile 33.jpg

Locomobile 19.jpg

Edited by Great War Truck (see edit history)
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Pierce Arrow?

British WD 1,705  All R Type

US army R Type 1,970 of which 1,365 arrived in France by the end of the war

US Army X Type 2,423 of which 534 arrived in France by the end of the war

French army. I dont have the figures but probably a couple of thousand of each

 

The French were the biggest user of the Pierce Arrow I am sure. There are several survivors over there.

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Lets deviate, for just a minute, away from Locomobile and Riker talk.  What is the difference between the Pierce-Arrow "R" type and the "X" type.  Do you know if the "R" and "X" were simply purchased as civilian models and served as military or were they built to a different standard for military use.  Actually the same question stands for Locomobile and Riker.  I see many more Pierce-Arrow trucks in the US than I even hear of Locomobile or Riker.

Al

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Yes, it is strange that so few Locomobiles survive. Pierce Arrows always seem to be turning up in France. The R type was designated as being able to carry five tons (but was used as a three tonner) while the X Type was a two tonner. I understand that both were built as civilian trucks and taken on by the military without change. Same as the Locomobile.

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Thanks for the "History" lesson on Locomobile, Riker and Pierce-Arrow.  I don't want to deviate too much from the subject matter of this thread, but I am on the scent of a WW-1 Pierce-Arrow truck project.  I do not know much yet, hopefully I will know more shortly.

Al

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Hello Mike,

I have not been to any of the larger truck museums so I can't speak of surety about how many Denby trucks are in the US.  In fact I know next to nothing about that make.  Refresh my memory, what model Pierce-Arrow are you building?

Regards,

Alan

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Hello Mike,

I have learned to "never say never" when it comes to looking for obscure parts.  Good for you on the parts acquisition for your Pierce-Arrow.  Are you getting enough pieces to proceed with your restoration or are you still tangled up with other truck restorations?  I am hopeful to hit the mother lode of Riker truck parts!  Sadly, not yet!

Al

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I wish you all a Merry Christmas and Happy new Year.  This season always gets me to thinking about and appreciating the sacrifices made by our fore fathers to preserve the liberties and lifestyle that we now enjoy in this modern world.  Those winter times, during WW-1 and WW-2 must have been brutal.  God bless those who made the supreme sacrifice.  Let us all do the best we can to make sure they are never forgotten.  Our interest in militaria, VIA this forum, is one small way we can keep the legacy and memory alive.  The restoration of a WW-1 vintage Riker truck helps me to appreciate those days gone by.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
clarity (see edit history)
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Hello Mike,

If I can track down enough pieces to build a Riker truck, I would dress it as a WW-1 work horse.  I also really enjoy the early vintage trucks and their involvement in the "Great War".  I like WW-2 stuff but not quite as much and currently have a civilian GMC dump truck that I still run.  That one is fun also.

Al

Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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  • 4 weeks later...
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Here is a link to the huge Locomobile literature collection now held by the Bridgeport Public Library.  They are very nice and helpful to deal with.  If you need or want anything listed give them a try.  The list is extensive!!

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I haven't invested time to track any of the current dedicated truck sales or auctions either here in the USA or around the world.  If you are an antique truck enthusiast, you may be a source of current information concerning auctions or estate sales.  Please post here if you are aware of auctions or current estate sales anywhere.  Maybe I will yet locate and purchase a Riker rolling chassis!

Al

Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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Hi AL  just checking in to see how your riker truck hunting’s  getting on?,

yeh i reckon with your persistence you will find something eventually, more than likely a chassis made into a farm trailer or something like that, this is how 1/2 the stuff ive found ends up, the early packard chassis i found recently had been made into a farm trailer which at least has saved it from being scrapped, 

keep at it mate im sure theres one our there

cheers mike 

 

pic of 3/4 ton model D or E packard

AF708DDB-70D8-43E9-B012-F6898A933F30.jpeg

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Hello Mike,

My search has been an absolute ZERO to date in my hunt for any Riker parts.  I was hoping to actually have a few pieces by now to start some assembly.  Looks like the Riker is still very much a back burner project.  Keep up the good work on your White.

Al

 

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I would like to take this moment to wish all those who read and participate on the Locomobile forums a Merry Christmas, fun Holidays and the best the New Year has to offer. Thanks for your contributions whether simply as a reader or a contributor. Long live Locomobile!

 

Al

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Hi Al

heres some pictures of the Denby truck i spoke off with the smith wheels, i just bought the 1919 Denby at a farm auction last weekend, they are nice wheels and remind me of my big Leyland cast steel spoked wheels in the 4th picture

mike

DF6E9AD1-6248-432A-A973-C02938DA3365.jpeg

BAD6D308-2578-4752-B3EE-2032CD3B942F.jpeg

0136798B-7A42-4DBA-B7CF-1C056BE16E4A.jpeg

C5250EA5-C863-4CC3-822B-FD3A257A1824.jpeg

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Hi Al , nah the Denby doesnt run but the big leyland is close to running,

Yeh the Denby is an interesting truck that came with a known history from when bought new to carry farm supplies wool etc from and to a little railway siding in the central north island,  i dont need any more projects but after seeing it at the auction and the fact it is quiet complete compared to what I usually muck around with i jumped in and bought it, 

i had first seen the denby back in 2009 but it wasnt for sale and the chassis had being used as a saw mill on a farm, the sheetmetal and rad and mechanicals lay on the ground in a farm shed, the previous owner bruce over the last few years had started to put it back together, but he passed away last year and now the farm has been sold and all of the farm eqipment etc was auctioned off, 

The gibbs family had bought the truck new and some pictures and information came with the truck,

ive added pictures of the denby working when based at Utiku

mike

0D02ECC3-9B4A-473C-82D4-6F1C63B2B92B.jpeg

F5C519A0-EAED-44BA-B391-CF473DF3881A.jpeg

C7784425-501F-4F2C-8F8F-CFF0878D46BB.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Have any of the current auctions, around the world, turned up early trucks or parts?  I am watching the current Pate Auctions from Helena Montana.  They are selling out an estate that will have two more auctions in the future.  The fellow had gathered a huge amount of parts, projects mostly automobile but some miscellaneous stuff also. I did buy an early automobile chain drive rear axle, which is good for an early project I have but sadly I didn't see any parts or pieces for early trucks, let alone Locomobile or Riker.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
Clarity (see edit history)
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I wish we had more examples of either Locomobile or Riker here in the USA.  It is my guess that most of the units, both Locomobile and Riker stayed in Europe after WW1.  You just don't see many, even in museums, here in the USA.

Al

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950480982_rikerframe1.jpg.7651e6651e8417

Here are a few pictures of a Riker chassis that has surfaced here in the USA.  I am currently trying to contact the current owner and see if a deal can be struck to reunite my Riker truck engine with a chassis.  Has anyone got a radiator or even allow access to duplicate one?

Al

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