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Toml33611

Advice on what to do with a 65 Skylark Convertible

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Man that is a keeper.  One owner family car, GS, 401 nailhead, decent interior.  Fix the brakes, detail it and drive it.  Lots of fun there.  

 

 

Edited by Zimm63 (see edit history)

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The car looks like it can be nice with detailing;  but

I feel that it's a "keeper" only if the owner likes old cars,

admires this particular one, and can devote the time to

using it periodically and having it maintained.  

As we car fans know, cars deteriorate if they are

not used.

 

It might be as if one of us inherited a nice piece of

Eastlake Victorian furniture.  Surely it's interesting,

but do we have the room and desire for it?

Furniture can be stored indefinitely;  cars take more work.

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Perhaps I should remain out of this, but I interpret post #16, above to be a bird in the hand . ?   -   Carl 

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Thanks again everyone for the insight.  Yes, I do have it posted in the Cars For Sale Section of this Forum and I apologize if that offends ya mike.  I'm leaning towards keeping the vehicle and learning a thing or two about owning/managing a classic car as a lot of you previously mentioned.  If I knew how to delete the For Sale post I would, but I'm also still trying to establish some baseline for what the car is worth.  Two mechanics offered me $4k for it but I think I'd rather keep it as a toy if thats what it is worth.  Again, thank you for everyone's input.  I got her tuned up and the brakes fixed.  Next up, a detail of the interior and engine bay.  Thanks for all the feedback

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If you read down thru page 1 you will see some people have already given guideline pricing. this is NADA pricing which appears fairly optimistic but note that $4K isn't even in the ballpark.

 

 
Original
MSRP 
  Low
 Retail
Average
Retail
        High
      Retail
Base Price
$2,842 
$13,200  
$21,300
    $39,700

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1 hour ago, Toml33611 said:

If I knew how to delete the For Sale post I would

I'm sure one of the fine moderators can help you out on that if you really want it deleted.

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2 hours ago, Toml33611 said:

...I got her tuned up and the brakes fixed.  Next up, a detail of the interior and engine bay.  ...

 

And a good wash and wax, too.

Your car is probably better than it appears

in the pictures.  Don't sell it to anyone for $4000.

 

If you keep the car, Tom, you'll want to have it

insured.  This should be done by a company

specializing in antique-car insurance--NOT a 

regular automotive insurance carrier.  Hagerty

and J. C. Taylor are well-respected companies,

and, since antique cars are babied and driven

a very limited mileage, you should find that insurance

is very affordable, maybe $100 a year or less.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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17 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

I'm sure one of the fine moderators can help you out on that if you really want it deleted.

 

I think the original poster can delete his own post.

You just have to look around while editing.

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He mentioned not the original engine.  That would detract from the value unless a correct period engine was installed.  I haven't googled the car yet, so I don't know if the Wildcat was offered back then - I would assume so.  

Can you verify that the engine was replaced?  Also, the VIN should tell you the correct engine that came with it from a size vantage point.

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On 11/7/2018 at 7:41 PM, vermontboy said:

...This is NADA pricing which appears fairly optimistic but note that $4K isn't even in the ballpark.

 

 
Original
MSRP 
  Low
 Retail
Average
Retail
        High
      Retail
Base Price
$2,842 
$13,200  
$21,300
    $39,700

 

Good observation, Vermont Boy!

The AACA Library has the actual book from which

their internet-based pricing must be taken.  In the

preface to their book, NADA acknowledges that their

listed prices are higher than others', but they say

that their pricing is for ALL-ORIGINAL (completely

unrestored) cars.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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On 11/7/2018 at 7:41 PM, vermontboy said:

...This is NADA pricing which appears fairly optimistic but note that $4K isn't even in the ballpark.

 

 
Original
MSRP 
  Low
 Retail
Average
Retail
        High
      Retail
Base Price
$2,842 
$13,200  
$21,300
    $39,700

 

these numbers are never realistic- only wishful thinking.

 

Love when they say a Stutz Bearcat from around 1915 is worth around 140k in #1 condition.

 

sure there are many dealers out there that would take 10 at that price! Cant restore one of them for that price, let alone find one.

 

so guide book numbers are a bit silly.

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Often NADA figures are right on.  Unless you know what you are looking at and when they are or when they are not, you can and will be taken advantage of as a seller or a buyer. 

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Well in that case, I have a bridge to sell.......................

 

40k for that car is never, should I repeat the word never- going to happen.

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Price guides generally do a better job of viewing the market for cars that are more abundant, and that change hands often. They seem to do a much poorer job of capturing the market for the cars that seldom change hands. You could go to a hundred car shows and not find one like yours. A convertible is especially rare and coveted. It's hard to even put a value on this car. I wouldn't even guess at the high end value for your car, but  $4000 is absurdly low. Comparable car sales are what are supposed to set the bar for the value guides, but if there aren't any cars like it that have changed hands, it becomes a guessing game. The market for any car is what it will bring at a moment in time. Some might suggest and eBay auction as a way of catching the market trend. At any rate you should join the Buick club, some members will have a good idea of it's real value. I applaud you for deciding to keep the car, selling and suffering seller's remorse is an experience that I don't recommend.

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Seller's remorse has always been easier for me than buyer's remorse. I just slide my hand into my pocket and wrap my fingers around the wad of bills.

 

Buyer's remorse means I have to clean the thing all up and sell it.

 

Best advice is to keep the car within the context of your own life. If you don't have $4,000 and $4,000 will put a new roof on a section of your house, you don't need an old car to spend money on.

 

Back when I was in my teens I worked in the used car business with my Grandfather. I REMEMBER one of our wholesaler friends who gave me a long story about "pyramiding"  his investment in one of the lizards he was pedaling by having this and that done to it. I remember those lessons well, sort of negative learning, listen and don't do.

 

Over the years I have developed a hypothesis that comes out with the same proof- "For every $1,000 you are willing to spend, you can buy $4,000 of someone else's investment."

 

You are very lucky you are not sitting there with a stripped front end and a $1,000 disc brake kit. Don't push your luck more. An inheritance is a windfall. Apply it appropriately to your lifestyle.

Bernie

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 "For every $1,000 you are willing to spend, you can buy $4,000 of someone else's investment."

 

Bernie - I like that and it may be true!

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$4,000 for that car is crazy low.  If the rear quarters and floors are in good shape (no rust or damage) it is easily worth well over $10,000.  It isn't just a '65 Skylark convertible, it is a '65 Gran Sport convertible.  It is a very rare car.  Among Buick and the smaller Buick GS population this is a very desirable car.  It isn't as valuable as other muscle cars like an SS 396 Chevelle despite being more expensive when new and a much better car overall, go figure.  If there is rust, then the price would drop accordingly.  The problem is that nobody makes exterior body panels for this model like they do for Chevelles or Mustangs.  That raises restoration costs above the return.  After all I think the car is in Massachusetts which has its share of rusty cars.  If you weren't so far away from me, I'd be a player.  Don't modify or dump it.  You have something that is very desirable to a select group of folks.  

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If the car has not sold, I urge you to visit 

65GS.com

 

The members there can assist you with anything you need for this car. Good luck!

 

Mark

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Thank you for everyone's input.  I have decided to keep the vehicle and have fun with it for a while.  I had no idea how much support this group would give me on figuring out what to do with the vehicle.  I appreciate the help!

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