Taosgirl

1931 Pontiac

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Hello, I have a 1931 Pontiac that I would love to sell but I have no idea how to price it. Can anyone give me a suggestion?

Thank you!

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Can't help you without knowing what type of 1931 Pontiac it is (i.e. 4-door, coupe, etc).

Also, would need some pictures and a detailed description of the condition of the car (restored, original, running or not, etc...)

It is also very helpful to put the location of where the car is, contact info, etc

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Thank you so much for replying. I will upload some pictures tomorrow. It is a 4 door, with a rebuilt flat head 6 engine. It does run. I live in New Mexico. It was repainted years ago, but has been outside so its chipping and cracking. The interior is original, I believe, but actually, I don't really know. maybe someone could tell by looking at it. Anyway, thank you again and I will post pics tomorrow.

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HI Terry, here are some pictures. They don't look that great, I guess I could have cleaned it up a little haha. But actually, it is what it is :)

IMG_0581.JPG

IMG_0583.JPG

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I'll be the first to shoot.  I think the interior was redone at some point.  Seems like it would have been a Mohair or similar material,  not vinyl or leather.  I think it's probably $4500-$5000 car. 

Someone put an alternator on it instead of a Generator.  Is it 6 or 12 volt?  Can't quite tell from the photo and the tag on the starter.   Not that it makes any difference in value. 

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I actually don't know if it is 6 or 12 volt.  Well shoot, thats lower than I was hoping. Unfortunately I spent around 4,000 rebuilding the engine, but I find it so hard to drive. I should have just put a regular motor in it. I just didn't want to change to the tires etc. Maybe I will just keep it as a lawn ornament. Thank you so much for your input.

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What specifically is it that you find hard when you are driving it?  It maybe the nature of the vehicle or something that can be fixed.

 

Sitting outside it will not increase in value.

 

Dave

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You got a deal if your engine rebuild was only around 4,000 although it is hard to believe that the engine was rebuilt considering it's appearance. .  It shouldn't be hard to drive.  I have driven my 1930 Pontiac 400,000 miles in 58 years of daily driving.  What seems to be hard about driving it.  Maybe I can help and you can enjoy driving it.

As auburnseeker suggests it is a 4,000 to 5,000 car as it stands.  If someone were going to "restore" it they would be looking at 4,000 to 8,000 for upholstery, minimum 10,000 for paint and 6,000 or more for re-plating.  This of course is if all the wood is okay.  If you had to redo some or all of the wood you could spend up 10,000 more.

Anyone would be looking at $30,000+ to restore this car that will be worth $16,000 to $18,000 when finished.

the engine number is above the dipstick, I wouldn't mind knowing that number and I would like to see a picture of the other side of the engine.

 

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The worst money to try to get out of an old car is money spent on mechanical rebuild.  I've learned this the hard way and do most of that myself, knowing as soon as I go under the hood of a car for anything other than detailing it will be money lost.   Very few people appreciate it.  Paint and chrome,  then interior sells. I would rather sell a car that looked like new with a blown motor or even a missing motor than to sell one that was ready to drive across the country but looked needy cosmetically.  

Paint and chrome don't get you home but it sure does sell cars. 

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Thank you all for your replies. It was rebuilt around 10 years ago and I bet theres not even 100 miles on it. Im not sure why it looks so bad, though it hasn't been cleaned or kept up. Unfortunately I know nothing about taking care of it and I also never realized i wouldn't be able to get what I put into it. Im realizing that now. :( The reason I find it hard to drive is, it doesn't have power steering and to start it you kind have to press 2 things on the floor and I am so worried that I would get it started and then go somewhere and not be able to start it again! So maybe its not that hard but to me, a girl, it does seem hard. Im really not sure what to do. It looks good in front of my house but its also a little depressing because I know it is rotting away little by little. Sorry, I don't mean to tell you all my sob story.Any way Tinindian, I will take a picture tomorrow of the other side of the engine.

Thanks again :)

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1 hour ago, Taosgirl said:

Thank you all for your replies. It was rebuilt around 10 years ago and I bet theres not even 100 miles on it. Im not sure why it looks so bad, though it hasn't been cleaned or kept up. Unfortunately I know nothing about taking care of it and I also never realized i wouldn't be able to get what I put into it. Im realizing that now. :( The reason I find it hard to drive is, it doesn't have power steering and to start it you kind have to press 2 things on the floor and I am so worried that I would get it started and then go somewhere and not be able to start it again! So maybe its not that hard but to me, a girl, it does seem hard. Im really not sure what to do. It looks good in front of my house but its also a little depressing because I know it is rotting away little by little. Sorry, I don't mean to tell you all my sob story.Any way Tinindian, I will take a picture tomorrow of the other side of the engine.

Thanks again :)

 

Depending where you're located in New Mexico, a local member might be able to come around and show you the ins and outs of the vehicle so you can drive it confidently

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Taosgirl I think someone has shown you one way of starting your engine.  There is no need to push two pedals on the floor.  You need to have the parking brake on (lever pulled back), the transmission in neutral, pull out the choke knob (marked C) all the way, pull out the throttle knob (marked T) about 3/4", turn on the key and step on the starter button on the floor.  The moment the engine starts push the choke in about three quarters and move the throttle knob in or out for the engine to run smoothly.  After a minute or so push the throttle in all the way and just use the accelerator pedal from then on.  If the engine has been running and is warm you should only pull the throttle out half an inch and don't use the choke.

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She could be referring to the clutch and starter pedal.  Though you could start it in Neutral with the hand brake on as it probably doesn't have a neutral safety switch on the clutch.  You really want to make sure it's in neutral though.  

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1 hour ago, auburnseeker said:

She could be referring to the clutch and starter pedal.  Though you could start it in Neutral with the hand brake on as it probably doesn't have a neutral safety switch on the clutch.  You really want to make sure it's in neutral though.  

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A good way to test your parking brake though, as the motor would not start in gear, if the brake is pulled hard enough. :)

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Sitting outside isn't good and for such a long time, it's taken a toll on everything.  What was done to the car was not correctly done so anyone who intended to restore it would not only have to correct what is currently deficient mechanically from sitting, but would need to "undo" all that was incorrectly restored to begin with.  The estimate on value provided is accurate and in fact may be on the high side.  Unfortunately cars of this eara are not as popular as they were a few years ago.  Please give it a good home rather than let it continue to deteriorate as a piece of "yard art."

Terry

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