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1931 Studebaker


Guest Jarka700
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Guest Jarka700

Hello

I have bought the 1931 Studebaker President Model 80w4 from Nevada.I am going to restorate it.I would like to know,how much such models have been produced and how much it have been left till now days.

I am looking for several parts.It is marked (red)on the photo (hood).If youcould advice where i can buy door handles kit (4 set), i would be thankfull.

Best regards

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The car looks to be a relatively complete machine and will be a good start to restore. The 1931 President 8 models are very popular with present day Studebaker collectors so because of that some parts like door handles have been reproduced in recent years. Rex Miltenberger of Niles, MI would be a good contact for parts because he has experience restoring several 1931 roadsters and knows about reproduction parts suppliers.

I don't know the latest roster scores of how many 1931's exist at this date but I think just roadsters alone exceed 50 or 60 cars.

Stude8

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For your reference I attached some photos of recent 1931 restorations here in USA, the roadsters and Mr Quinn's Coupe are all very high quality automobiles and show why the 1931 models are so popular with collectors because of their classic styling.

Stude8

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Guest Jarka700
The car looks to be a relatively complete machine and will be a good start to restore. The 1931 President 8 models are very popular with present day Studebaker collectors so because of that some parts like door handles have been reproduced in recent years. Rex Miltenberger of Niles, MI would be a good contact for parts because he has experience restoring several 1931 roadsters and knows about reproduction parts suppliers.

I don't know the latest roster scores of how many 1931's exist at this date but I think just roadsters alone exceed 50 or 60 cars.

Stude8

es,the car is complete, exeptionally of several parts.Body no rust.Could you give me the contacts of Rex Miltenberger ?

Do you know the exact size of the tires,and where it would be better to buy them ?

thank you :)

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Guest Jarka700
Congratulations on a beautiful automobile! There was a guy selling the reproduction interior door handles on eBay. I don't know if they are 100% proper for your car, but you camn check them out and they should be close.

Thank you ! I am looking for exterior door handles, not interior.

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You can contact Rex Miltenberger at "studerex@aol.com" he lives near Niles, Michigan.

About the tires, I believe your car has 19" wire wheels? The proper size is either 6:00x19" or 6:50x19". the problem is present tire sizes even though they have the same size number as 1931 sizes the inflated width can be larger in modern tires and not fit well in the front fender side mount openings.

In USA there are several sellers of these vintage tires, "www.coker.com"; "www.lucasclassictires.com"; and "www.universaltire.com". I would look at all their sites and be sure the size you want to purchase have the authentic tread pattern for the 1931 vintage car you have. Some use a post WWII smooth straight rib pattern not correct for your age car.

Stude8

Edited by stude8 (see edit history)
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Attached is an image of the tires I have recently installed on my 1928 Studebaker Commander with 20" wood spoke wheels. They are Denman brand but unfortunately they went out of business a year ago. The tread design was correct for this age car.

Stude8

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Very nice car. Good luck.

I agree with the previous comments regarding tires. The correct tires are critical to the proper look. Radials are a huge faux paux in my opinion and the correct width and tread pattern are very important.

I personally loathe whitewalls but that is just me.

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Guest Jarka700
You can contact Rex Miltenberger at "studerex@aol.com" he lives near Niles, Michigan.

About the tires, I believe your car has 19" wire wheels? The proper size is either 6:00x19" or 6:50x19". the problem is present tire sizes even though they have the same size number as 1931 sizes the inflated width can be larger in modern tires and not fit well in the front fender side mount openings.

In USA there are several sellers of these vintage tires, "www.coker.com"; "www.lucasclassictires.com"; and "www.universaltire.com". I would look at all their sites and be sure the size you want to purchase have the authentic tread pattern for the 1931 vintage car you have. Some use a post WWII smooth straight rib pattern not correct for your age car.

Stude8

There are 6.00/6.50 - 19, 6 pr tires on this car right now.Which are better 6.00/6.50 - 19 or 6.50 - 19 ? Firestone or BF Goodrich ?

Firestone 3 1/2 Inch Whitewall - 650-19

BF Goodrich 3 3/4 Inch Whitewall - 600/650-19

Thanks

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Guest Jarka700
Very nice car. Good luck.

I agree with the previous comments regarding tires. The correct tires are critical to the proper look. Radials are a huge faux paux in my opinion and the correct width and tread pattern are very important.

I personally loathe whitewalls but that is just me.

yes, i am going to buy whitewalls only :)

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Guest Jarka700
That looks like the car that came out of Idaho. Did you buy it from a retired pharmacist in Nevada? The correct tires are availble from coker. They now have the correct tread pattern and sizing. Rex studebakerclassics.com

I have bought this car from Nevada,this car was sold buy the real owners friend,becouse the real owner started to renowate it,unfortunately,hi had not finished it,becouse of the dead.The seller explaned this.

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Guest Jarka700

There are 6.00/6.50 - 19, 6 pr tires on this car right now.Which are better 6.00/6.50 - 19 or 6.50 - 19 ? Firestone or BF Goodrich ?

Firestone 3 1/2 Inch Whitewall - 650-19

BF Goodrich 3 3/4 Inch Whitewall - 600/650-19

Thanks

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The firestones were what came on the 31s. I put them on the 2 roadsters in the photo posted by stude8. I have driven many miles on them with no problems. As you can see in the photos the side mounts fit the fender wells correctly. With or without the covers. But the goodyears have the correct thread pattern. They are only 1/4 taller per cokers specifications. Either should work.

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Guest Jarka700
The firestones were what came on the 31s. I put them on the 2 roadsters in the photo posted by stude8. I have driven many miles on them with no problems. As you can see in the photos the side mounts fit the fender wells correctly. With or without the covers. But the goodyears have the correct thread pattern. They are only 1/4 taller per cokers specifications. Either should work.

ok,thank you for information.

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Almost all the prewar Studebakers have a failure of the Kelley-Springfield fuel gauge system. The line from fuel tank to instrument gauge in dash board can fail or leak or be plugged with dirt or the indicator Red fluid in the instrument gets dried up and no longer shows the level of fuel in the tank.

A long time ago a service data page was created by Bill Cannon who started the Antique Studebaker Club. Fortunately I have a copy on file and scanned it for you, it is attached to this message. Hopefully it will help you determine what the fault is in your gauge or copper tubing system.

Stude8

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Guest stude8

I did rewire a 1930 President 8 Victoria some years ago and made up a wire chart given Color, AWG, length and terminations for each conductor. This is in Micro Soft Excel format. I can email a copy if you provide an email address, the AACA forum does not allow Excel file format documents to be attached.

You can email to me at studeracer_37@yahoo.com.

Stude8

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Guest stude8

So thats why my Google search didn't work, wrong K-S.

Now I know where to get the capillary ferrules for my 28 fuel gauge.

John

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Jarka700
I did rewire a 1930 President 8 Victoria some years ago and made up a wire chart given Color, AWG, length and terminations for each conductor. This is in Micro Soft Excel format. I can email a copy if you provide an email address, the AACA forum does not allow Excel file format documents to be attached.

You can email to me at studeracer_37@yahoo.com.

Stude8

Thank you very much for you information (wiring diagram) !!!

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Guest Jarka700

I would ask you for fast help: How i can take off (remove) the brake drums of the rear wheel ? I am adding photoes maybe it will help you.

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Jarka

The tool you are using looks to be not strong enough, the two arms should be 3 arm and heavier metal construction.

Read this article that was on the AACA forum previously:

http://forums.aaca.org/f126/1927-studebaker-dictator-eu-wheel-question-259862.html

Scroll down to response #9 with photos of a heavy duty 3 arm puller attached to a steel plate behind the special "Split" threaded clamp that grips to the hub cap threads on brake drum (wood spoke wheels) Your hub has the 6 studs so a flat steel plate could be made to connect to the 6 studs with nuts on at least 3 of them. Actually a 3 arm puller like the one pictured in response #9 would probably be strong enough.

When installed on your hub and with center threaded shaft drawn up as tight as possible then apply heat from Acetylene torch to the hub around where it is clamped to the taper axle end THEN when HOT strike the outside end of the threaded shaft to shock the hub and axle end with a heavy steel hammer. It will take several hard strikes but after a few the drum will suddenly let go with a loud noise and come off.

Attached is image of the right tool type to use OTC #7394 name is Owatonna Tool Co. in USA but other companies make similar 3 arm tools to use.

Stude8

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I agree with everything stude 8 said about the puller. Just want to add an emphasis on the big hammer. It is the mass that is important to loosen the hub on the tapered shaft. I have removed lots of rear tractor hubs as well as the hubs on a light six. I use a 3 inch diameter by 4 foot long shaft, suspended from the ceiling in a chain. This allows me to swing it accurately. Never had to hit a hub more than twice to get a hub loose once heated. The John Deere discussion forum has a long detailed thread on this subject.

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Guest Jarka700

Hello

thanks fot the information.

I have made this construction,but even using it i can not take off.Won't i damage it,if i will use more power ? I was pulling it so hard as i can,but it still doesn't move.

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You need the tool that "stude8" shows. Adjust the brake shoes all of the way in. Mount the stud-mounted puller. Just when you think you have hit it hard enough....hit it some more. Tap the edge of the drum as you tighten the puller. DO NOT STAND IN FRONT OF THE DRUM! It may just fly off and across the shop. Don't give up.

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Jarka

Like the others have said and myself the trick to loosening the drum hub is the SHOCK of the hammer strike. Your hydraulic jack applies the pressure but what breaks the bond of the drum to the taper axle end is the shock of striking it with a large hammer. With the hydraulic jack there is no way to strike it hard enough.

Since you already have made a good puller plate to bolt to the drum studs just find a 3 arm tool and add the 3 holes and bolts to the plate for the 3 arm tool then you can strike against the threaded tool shaft to shock the drum free.

In my attached photo you can see the axle nut is still in place but lossened outward so when the drum pop's off axle it does not fly across the shop and hurt some one.

Stude8

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  • 2 weeks later...

Get the tool! Known as a hub puller, here is one on ebay

Hub and Wheel puller | eBay

The tool is anything but small, the force is enormous! It is about a 1 1/4" fine thread screw you hammer with a 2 1/2 pound hammer till tight. When it will not turn any more hit it on the end with the 2 1/2 pound hammer as hard as you can. Make sure you have enough room around the wheel to work. I always leave the axel nut on the car, this gives you a hole to place the end of the screw and the wheel will never "fly" off the car. When you hit it hard enough everything gets loose and you hear a "snap" if you can find one the 4 jaw is even stronger. Take your time getting everything lined up properly. Make sure you put it back together dry!!!!!! The hardest one I have ever had to get apart had a leaking oil seal and was well lubricated. Trust the tool and it will come off every time.

PS If you are not in good health find a someone who likes splitting wood to give you a hand.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest Jarka700

Thanks for everybody for your help and time, i have managed to take it off ! :)

I have several more questions :

1) where i can buy such oil filter ?

2) where i can buy 6 volt positive ground ignition coil ?

Thank you !

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I owned a 1930 President 8 for 27 years and it finally needed a new coil, it was the dual coil ignition system with both coils mounted on firewall. I wanted matching coils and found some new 1954 Chevrolet coils with the Delco Remy script molded into the top end piece.

The coil number was Remy 1115380 and it was 6volt, oil filled and worked quite well for years before I sold the car. The replacement coils I bought around 1990 had already been reproduced for the large demand for GM cars of that period being restored so I would think that coil should be available even at this time.

Stude8<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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  • 1 month later...

I see that you have not received a reply yet.

These oil filters are hard to find.

They were used on several makes cars but I have never seen one for sale.

Post this question on this forum "buy and sell " category and maybe these

are reproduced by a vendor of parts for an other make of cars.

We all appreciate that you are restoring this rare car and especially since you

live in Lithuania.

Thirty years ago before Al Gore invented the internet (joke) it was very hard

for people oversees to obtain advice and parts for such a project.

Robert Kapteyn

Joliet Illinois

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