Jump to content

PreWar Mercedes Benz


Recommended Posts

I didn't think the factory wires were strong enough for the weight of the armor. Is the car on the left really armored?

Btw, I like the styling as far as 2 door sedans go.

Not sure about the wheels, but if the boxed frame of this car is representative, the rest of the car should hold up fine ;)

post-31207-143138817988_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tough call, there have been one or two Duesenbergs with heavy coachwork that have ruined the wheels over time.

A.J. the car in post 234 is really pretty and another example of the only possible improvements being BW tires - I think the top contrasts nicely even if tan was unusual for the day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tough call, there have been one or two Duesenbergs with heavy coachwork that have ruined the wheels over time.

A.J. the car in post 234 is really pretty and another example of the only possible improvements being BW tires - I think the top contrasts nicely even if tan was unusual for the day.

Tan is not unusual now!

That car was sold for nothing - relatively speaking :) - and just needed to lose the whitewalls and fix the "boot" to be really really nice. Also, while I'm spending someone else's money I would consider painting the wheels and going with the chrome weight covers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Speaking of the Caracciola 500k Chris Summer's sent me this link: Exotic Junk Yard Discovery

excerpted text:

The owner of the yard has passed away and his sons are now running the joint. Supposedly they are not letting anyone in. The gem of the collection is a one-off 1935 Mercedes-Benz Caracciola 500K that is worth big money. This whole situation takes me back to when I was young. The thought of discovering something rare in there and picking it up for pennies is a nice one. Unfortunately, we have no doubt that the new owners know exactly what they have in there and precisely what it is worth. It is nice to dream though...

post-31305-143138830284_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alsancle, that is an extremely distressing story about the Caracciola 500K. However, your information did lead me to further images of the car (photos of it are almost as rare as the car itself):

The only color photo I've ever seen...

03mrazcaracciola500kcolor.jpg

This is from a Russian site, evidently at Pebble Beach...

500KCaracc-BW.png

It was apparently in this era that Jo-Han created their 1/25 model kit, having access to the actual car with chrome wire wheels and whitewalls...

johan500k.png

I've never found interior shots of this car. And it seems odd that your photo on the docks has a different license plate number than the factory photos, which show "111A 32015." It's also interesting to note that the Pebble Beach version has different marker lights on the front fenders. Wish I could find more shots.

Edited by Skip Jordan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Alsancle, that is an extremely distressing story about the Caracciola 500K. However, your information did lead me to further images of the car (photos of it are almost as rare as the car itself):

The only color photo I've ever seen...

03mrazcaracciola500kcolor.jpg

This is from a Russian site, evidently at Pebble Beach...

500KCaracc-BW.png

It was apparently in this era that Jo-Han created their 1/25 model kit, having access to the actual car with chrome wire wheels and whitewalls...

johan500k.png

I've never found interior shots of this car. And it seems odd that your photo on the docks has a different license plate number than the factory photos, which show "111A 32015." It's also interesting to note that the Pebble Beach version has different marker lights on the front fenders. Wish I could find more shots.

The color shot of the car looks to have been taken at a National AACA meet in San Diego. I recognize the building.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone who wants to know more about the Caracciola 500K should run quickly to the newsstand/bookstore to get the February issue of Town & Country, before it goes away (I got the last copy at my Books-A-Million today; Ali MacGraw on the cover). It contains the most complete history of this car that we're likely to see in our lifetimes (due to the eccentric nature of the brothers who own the Porche [sic] salvage yard in South Central L.A. - sons of the last owner - where it lies on flattened tires under layers of dirt, and is unlikely to see the light of day again). The article has far more detail than any of the summaries available online.

Does anyone know Tom Hanson (son of Dale Hanson, who restored it to the state shown above in 1965), or Mike Kunz of Mercedes Classic Center? I need to find someone who knows what the dashboard is like --leather or wood, and what kind of wood? They're among the few people who have seen the car since it was garaged in 1980.

Edited by Skip Jordan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

For anybody keeping track of these things here is a 37 540k Cab "B" that sold at Retromobile last week for approx 645k. Looks to be an older restoration. I couldn't find a catalog description. Take note of the earlier of the two Cab "B" body styles. I prefer the humpback (later style), but there are many that like this one.

post-31305-143138834603_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Thought you all might find this interesting. My friend is in the middle of a restoration of a '37 540K cabriolet. Here's a pic of them removing the body from the frame.

I don't know about the rest of you, but while a restored car is a beautiful thing, there's just something about one in process that makes you want to roll up your sleeves and dive in. I've got two restored non-classics under my belt, but I'm starting to get the "itch" for something...

post-31207-143138889117_thumb.jpg

Edited by CBoz (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the rear hinged doors I would say Cab "A". Wow, not very many of those that have not been restored yet. Any more pictures?

The restoration process looks great when someone else is paying for it :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a couple more. The top may be original (but obviously due for replacement). My friend is looking for copies of body and shop manuals that would help with the restoration. If you have or know of a good source, let me know!

post-31207-143138890337_thumb.jpg

post-31207-143138890339_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The first version of the 540k Cab A is my favorite. I'm having trouble placing this particular car in my mind. There are very few unrestored Cab A's left. Do you know any of the history. Perhaps a photo before the restoration started :).

I assume you friend is in contact with Jim Friswold in Tigard Oregon 1-503-639-1158. He should have reproductions of the owners manual and parts list with are the only manuals available for the 540k.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey -- I'm not sure who the owner is, but from what I understand the car was purchased in its current state several decades ago, and the restoration is finally getting started, so it's been out of commission for probably 40+ years. From what little I know, I don't think the front fenders are the original style. Sorry I can't provide more details.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Some recent pics of the '37 Cabriolet restoration. The engine and tranny will need a thorough going through. My friend also tells me about 20% of the wood will have to be replaced. And as you can see, the wiring cluster will need a *little* work ;)

post-31207-143138921311_thumb.jpg

post-31207-143138921313_thumb.jpg

post-31207-143138921316_thumb.jpg

post-31207-143138921319_thumb.jpg

Edited by CBoz (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Just a note because I can't start a new thread anymore.

The new Home Page looks great, but it takes forever to load and to navigate away from. I have a very good broadband/fiber optic connection, so that's not an issue. Any ideas on trying to start a new thread?

Link to post
Share on other sites
This may be the last picture of the Caracciola 500K before it disappeared into Klein's storage. Supposedly, that's Rudi Klein on the far right.

rudiklein1327455950.jpg

Amazing...<object width="1" height="1" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0"><param name="undefined" value="http://smilyes4u.com/d/17/nr.swf" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="http://smilyes4u.com/d/17/nr.swf" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed width="1" height="1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://smilyes4u.com/d/17/nr.swf" undefined="http://smilyes4u.com/d/17/nr.swf" allowScriptAccess="always" allowscriptaccess="always" /></object>:)

Link to post
Share on other sites
I need to choose a MB engine & drivetrain to power a 1936 540K special roadster. This is not a "Heritage" or other fiberglas kit car; it is a true 540K built by some of the premier restoration experts for the original cars. It will be a 540K in every respect except engine, transmission and suspension. Of course the original was a supercharged straight 8. I'm thinking about an M103 from a 1989 300SE. What would you put in this car and why? Thanks for any input. I think the two basic arguments are: (1) something that looks relatively period (straight six), and (2) something that would cause car guys to exclaim, "Hey, nice engine."

Would love to see some pictures. It is your project of course, but if you have an exact replica then you have obviously spent some significant money. An engine from an 89 would very uninteresting in my mind. A couple of years ago there was a straight 8 from a Type 500 for sale. That would have been perfect. Not a 500k engine of course but MB and period appropriate. I would vote for a straight 8 overhead valve engine of 1930s vintage.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I have been looking for an overhead chassis image for the Mercedes SS-SSK for quite some time, but can't find one.

Does anyone know where the battery is located and what type it is?

EDIT: Never mind, I found it in my original owner's/tech manual with the electrical diagram. The battery box is attached to the left frame rail under the seat. Going through my references, I have a lot more than I remembered. It's tough getting older.

Edited by Skip Jordan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

On another note, does anyone know the difference between the two following carburetor/air intake setups?

This first one is a fairly typical SSK engine. Note that there are two air intakes above the carburetors that enter the cylinder head; each one has a hose that goes down and attaches to the side of the oil pan.

Picture2-2.png

This second shot is from a 1933 SS W 06 Sportzweisitzer (Cabriolet A) that I've posted a while back in this thread. Note that there are no hoses going from the large intakes, but there are three smaller ones, with connecting hoses, that are attached to the cylinder head. This is evidently a one-of-a-kind factory set-up. Has anyone seen this on another SS/SSK, or know any details about it?

33SSengine1.png

Edited by Skip Jordan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

On another subject that you may find of interest...Alberto de Oliveira, a Portuguese modeler who passed away last year at 85, specialized in large-scale Mercedes (typically 1/8) and he was building until the end. Everything was scratch-built using wooden bucks and metal, some of it simply upsized from existing kits, and he had a friend with Mercedes who supplied him with vast amounts of reference. He also was a collector of zillions of Mercedes diecasts. The web pages are in Portuguese, but you can see his accomplishments in the images. His son is trying to sell the entire collection, asking around 90,000 euros.

http://alberto-de-ol...a.blogspot.com/

Construction process:

http://alberto-de-ol...i.blogspot.com/

Oliveira.jpg

Galleries:

http://alberto-de-ol...s.blogspot.com/

Edited by Skip Jordan (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...