Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Roger

I know you are building in such a small scale but what about a worm wheel and gear. That would take the over torque out of the motor and it would slow down the action of the window movement. With this method the motor could be mounted anywhere space is available. The drive would be a cable turning the gears.  The image added is for a Mercedes Replacement Window Motors (OES Genuine Window Regulator - W0133-1718533 - Front, Driver Side, Power). As always Roger I love what you have accomplished and the length of time you have been working on this beaut. You are more than a craftsman. I have enjoyed the build for many years and I will not lose this site again. Thank you Roger.

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Thanks Nelson for that proposal; I'm glad you found the thread again!. As you could see, all windows are now operating. When I began to imagine the electric windows for the Toronado model, various system were existing but they were not practical with my tools at this scale. The motors I'm using for the side windows have a reduction of 1:298 which, with 1.5 V, is giving a decent window movement.

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Basically, the seats are done. There will be more detail work when I will cover the wood with the leather as the shape of the various elements is done without taking the leather thickness into account. The most demanding element was the rear central armrest. I measured the dimensions of the various levers but, for the first time in 8 years, I lost that piece of paper. I could have gone back to the new Mark II owner but I decided that indeed a rear movable arm rest could not be rocket science! I did first a mechanism with cardboard 5 times the actual parts and saw that, to have a logic movement, precise dimensions is a must. After some trial and errors, I was set and could go with the metal parts. As you can see on the pictures, the arm rest is partly brass and wood.

899 with seats.JPG

900 rear seat.JPG

901 rear seat.JPG

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When parts are difficult to realize, I have the bad habit to push away their construction. The small conduit for the wiring at the doors is one of those…Before I’m beginning with the body preparation, I had to do them. At first, by looking at the real pieces I did not understand the shape behind the pillar and decided to do it my way. Then I saw that the wiring would hit the door’s pillar…Therefore the hook was needed. I had to install and remove the door many times to have the right shape but, as 11 wires have to take place in that conduit on the LH door, I increased the dimensions a tad. For that reason, I had also to enlarge the aperture at the pillar…On the RH door, there are only 5 wires and that piece could be done marginally thinner.

Doing this small addition let me take a decision: normally, door hinges are assembled with a not removable shaft. I had that on the RH door and I realized that when the conduit is in place, the aperture of the door is reduced, preventing to install all the screws at the pillar. When I tried to attach the hinges at the pillar and then to install the door at the hinges, I had so many difficulties to find the holes for the screws I decided the make the final assembly just by inserting a shaft into the hinges. When the front fender are installed, nobody will notice this trick.

The conduit is the unpainted piece between both hinges.

902 conduit.JPG

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A quick update about the work: I’m preparing the body for the paint. It’s a tedious work as the shape of the car is rather complex. The picture is almost like a real car in a body shop with some progress. There are high and low spots; when sanding the red epoxy primer, most of the high spots are gone, but not always: when the brass can be seen, it has obviously not the correct shape. Some brass can be removed by filing, but I have to stop before the material is too thin or, worse, has a hole. Low spots are filled up with some filler. Once sanded, the surface is getting a thin coat of primer and the chase to high/low sports continue…I was convinced that the LH rear quarter was fine and as you can see on the picture, it was not.

Hood, roof and trunk lid are ready; the remaining elements not yet. It will take a long time until I will be satisfied.

During curing time, I’m covering some parts with leather which is .1 to .2 mm (0.004 to 0.008”) thick; unfortunately, the leather I have is not the right color. I will show the covered parts only when they have been painted with the proper color; I’m awaiting leather paint for the next few days.

903 body work.JPG

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Roger, once all the individual panels are completed will you be assembling the body components to check for proper fitment and alignment and making necessary changes if needed, or did you fit it prior to this work ?

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Indeed, I did both way with a rough fitting before the work I'm doing now. I jut noticed that the LH door, which I thought it was finished, does not follow too much the rear quarter profile. If each body component would be finished individually without checking the whole picture, the end result would be...not good.

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Roger,

Now this is where it gets down to the finite.  Fit and finish is everything in body and paint.  I just had a car done (6 months ago) and it is a 1:1.  Much easier than a 1:12.  They did a very good job and my Spider is going back together soon.  I handed them a "shell" completely stripped of all the interior and exterior trim, windshield frame, etc., etc.  The manager of the body shop had his guys on my car for a long time getting every detail finessed.  The end results were first class.  We walked around the car and could not find one flaw, run, or door, trunk or hood that was not aligned perfectly.  All in all, I was quite pleased.  Being in the small scale as 1:12, it must be exact too.  We can not wait to see the end results of the body work/paint job.

Randy

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Thanks JWL! Something is not correct: there were two tone paints from the factory! I admit there were not many, and 2-tone paint is not a necessity on that car. "mine" will have a solid color.

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Even if I was quite lately, work is continuing. It's not making sense to show each filler application or sanding!. The main body (rear fenders, roof, doors and trunk lid) are at 95% satisfying. I still have some improvements to do, especially at the cross panel between trunk lid and back window. We had a wonderful October month; therefore, I could do most of the surfacer job outside. Today, we said goodbye to the summertime and hello to the wintertime, the weather is getting cooler and humid.

I ordered the paint for the leather; it’s water based and I have to spray it with my airbrush because it seems that water based colors cannot be sold in a rat can. The blue paint for the leather is rather darker than the original medium blue. As the outside paint is also different, I choose a blue which is in harmony with the outside color. With the white bolsters, I will give a good contrast.

On the first picture, 3 leather parts at the right are ready to install, one with some chrome trim. The other parts are ready to be painted; the lower door trim panels will be done next. As you can see, I’m using quite a few leather colors; I just hope that I will have enough. The thickness is between 0.1 and 0.2 mm (0.004 to 0.008”); thicker leather cannot be used. The second picture is my leather’s stock.

 

904 Trim parts.JPG

905 Leather.JPG

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Roger,

Intricate work.   Are you using French glove leather?  When researching the leather for the Pocher, I was directed to that particular leather as it was the thinnest available.  And after getting it,  there was a spot that I needed to have it thinner.  It can be "sanded" on the back side for an even thinner application of the leather.  Being in Switzerland, they have the finest leathers available, yes? 

 

Randy 

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After about 8 days without phone and Internet, I can communicate again!

Randy, I have no idea for which application the leather I have was used for. Up to now, the gloves I had in hand had a leather too thick for my need. Also, I doubt that gloves with a leather 0.1 mm thick would not tear the first time of use!

 

Yes, Randy, the back can be "sanded" with coarse sand paper; I'm doing that very often. With a thin leather, the risk to make a hole is not negligible.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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For 8 days, due to an outside “repair”, we had no phone, TV nor Internet; very annoying! The positive aspect: I was less distracted and I could spend more time with the model. Many leather trim parts could be painted; this allowed me to install definitively some chrome parts. As usual, when parts are plated, even if the coat is very thin, there can be some problems like I had to insert the A/C levers into their respective slots.

When parts are covered with leather, even a very thin one, there are also difficulties to assemble elements, even if some play was considered during fabrication. Up to now, I could overcome the difficulties without damages. You see below some elements which are ready or, like the front seat, in preparation. The “cushions” for the seat back are not yet covered with leather, this is the next task. The robe cord for the seat back is also missing, the escutcheons must be chromed first.

I like the look of the lower door trim panels; I pictured the back of the LH panel; will I be able to connect all those wires?

 

 

906 front seat.JPG

907 front seat back.JPG

908 door trim.JPG

909 many wires.JPG

911 mirror and sunshades.JPG

910 controls.JPG

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Yes, John, you have pretty much summed it up. 

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Wonderful work and detailing,its a always a pleasure to watch your build.

 

9 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

For 8 days, due to an outside “repair”, we had no phone, TV nor Internet; very annoying! The positive aspect: I was less distracted and I could spend more time with the model. Many leather trim parts could be painted; this allowed me to install definitively some chrome parts. As usual, when parts are plated, even if the coat is very thin, there can be some problems like I had to insert the A/C levers into their respective slots.

When parts are covered with leather, even a very thin one, there are also difficulties to assemble elements, even if some play was considered during fabrication. Up to now, I could overcome the difficulties without damages. You see below some elements which are ready or, like the front seat, in preparation. The “cushions” for the seat back are not yet covered with leather, this is the next task. The robe cord for the seat back is also missing, the escutcheons must be chromed first.

I like the look of the lower door trim panels; I pictured the back of the LH panel; will I be able to connect all those wires?

 

 

906 front seat.JPG

907 front seat back.JPG

908 door trim.JPG

909 many wires.JPG

911 mirror and sunshades.JPG

910 controls.JPG

 

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Wow Roger ! ! !

 

I am particularly impressed with the trim piece that has the sun visors.  The fit and finish on all the parts are absolute perfection but the visors really capture the outstanding symmetry and fine detail of the scale.  Viewing the parts on the headliner will be difficult (unless you are 1:12 scale) The viewer will need a dentist's oral mirror to see all the wonders that you have captured in the overhead.  I really like the color.  Outstanding 

 

Randy

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Randy, thanks for the comments! At first, that blue tone was not what I expected but, the more I see it, the more I like it. I forgot to say that the sunshades are movable in 2 directions: to hide the sun when it's in front of the driver and on the side too. Will that be easy to operate when assembled? I doubt!

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