68RIVGS

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About 68RIVGS

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 05/11/1940

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Downtown Stittsville - Ottawa, Ontario
  • Interests:
    Old Cars, Antiques, Aircraft, and Digital Photography

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  1. 68RIVGS

    Woody

    . . . thinking of "personalizing" your glove box door Mr. Paul ? LOL
  2. . . . just hand fabricate some - once the trim pieces are installed nobody will ever see them. About 18" long, and the bend is about a 1/4" deep and roughly15 degree offset, -just enough to allow the lip on the trim to slip over them - same with the dimpled washers. The trim simply slips over these strips, and dimpled washers and hangs there. The sheet metal screws at the bottom secure the ribbed rocker panel trim to the car.
  3. 68RIVGS

    Rebuilding my 69 GS

    I believe all "full size" '68/'69 Buick Riviera, Wildcat, and Electra 225, and possibly other years shared the same accelerator pedal.
  4. The front portion mounts into a galvanized metal strip that has a "V" lip in the top - the same holds true for the rear most portion of the rocker panel trim. The entire length of the panel is secured by 3, to 6 dimpled cup washers screwed, and positioned along the length of the rocker panel. The lip on the top of the anodized aluminum cover is trapped behind the "v" strips and the dimpled washers. The sheet metal screw at the bottom of the ribbed molding secure the rocker panel molding to the car. I also painted my ribbed molding to simulate the Black anodized finish after straightening and dent removal. The original factory finish had faded from age and exposure to road debris. It barely shows once it's mounted on the lower portion of the car. There may be more rocker panel trim info in a '68/'69 Fisher Body Manual. . . . trust this helps Graymist69
  5. Some spray cans of lithium grease come with a hollow plastic tube that can be inserted into the can nozzle to direct the spray? Otherwise you can use a small disposable brush to spread the grease into the tracks - oil all the bare steel pivot points with a silicone spry while your at it, and ensure the glass moves smoothly and freely without any binding. Apply the grease and light oil sparingly, a little helps a lot!
  6. 68RIVGS

    Rebuilding my 69 GS

    . . . apply a little silicone grease to the replacement pedal - it will come off easier if it's necessary to remove it again ! It will also keep the steel ball studs from rusting and chewing up the pedal rubber sockets.
  7. . . . as I recall, the OPGI tray did not fit very well, and required quite a few mods for an acceptable fit !
  8. . . . use the glass lens as a pattern, and make a new one out of acrylic plastic ?
  9. ??????????????????????????????????????????? HUH?. Have a gander at a schematic Tom - all power window motors are chassis grounded by the mounting bolts. Each 3 wire power window switch is powered +12VDC, and the other two motor leads are up, or down. The power window motors are grounded via the motor mounting bolts !
  10. If it's anything like Costco here in Canada, a new battery is covered by a 3 year, free replacement warranty as long as you have your original invoice. After that it's pro-rated for 84 months. I swear by COSTCO batteries, and use them in my fleet !
  11. As Ed stated, one terminal for up, and the other for down. The chassis ground is usually through the case via the mounting bolts. You can use any +12V DC source to test the motors.
  12. Welcome to the ROA forum, . . . like RoadShark sez, and also check out the ROA website at www.rivowners.org when you get a chance !
  13. 68RIVGS

    Rebuilding my 69 GS

    Absolutely gorgeous Greymist69 - it just suits the car. Here's my '68 Riviera at the Hershey Annual ROA meet in 2010. Thanks for the color id.- you made a very good choice !
  14. 68RIVGS

    Rebuilding my 69 GS

    Looks very nice after all your time and troubles - well worth the effort Greymist69 ! That color does look really great - I'm guessing you went with the original '69 Deep Grey Mist, Code: L My '68 was painted almost the same color - it's a Medium Grey Metallic, an '86 GM color. It still looks as good today as it did 35+ years ago ! So I'm sort of partial to shiny Grey cars. LOL