65VerdeGS

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About 65VerdeGS

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  • Birthday 08/16/1965

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Vancouver, BC

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  • Biography
    I've owned my '65 Gran Sport since 1983.

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  1. Thanks to guys like Tom we now have access to quality reproduction parts. When I got my '65 in 1983 there was almost nothing reproduced for these cars. We've come a long way since then so it's easier to restore these cars we love with correct reproduction replacements, or at least as reasonably correct as possible.
  2. Hi Daryle, Can you post a photo of your original package tray, and a pic of Clars tray for comparison? I'm considering replaing the package tray on my '65 and wonder how similar the Clarks tray is to the original. Do I assume correctly that you have to paint the Clarks tray to match your interior? Thanks
  3. Thanks Chimera for sharing the article. It wrongly cites the base engine size as 425 cu.in. Nice looking black on black '65. It will be interesting to see how much this car brings at auction later this month.
  4. I'm confused - why does the '66 dual quad valve cover have a separate oil fill cap in the middle of the left valve cover? The '64/'65 dual quad motors only have the breather cap at the front. To add oil, you remove the breather cap and pour it in there. Why did Buick go to a separate oil fill opening on the '66 dual quad motor? Also, did ALL '66 dual quad left hand valve covers have that 'bump' or dip? This presumably to clear the A.I.R. pump. But I understand A.I.R. was only mandatory for cars sold new in California in '66 and '67. Did Buick use the bumped valve cover in all dual quad equipped cars, even those sold in states where AIR was not required?
  5. Hi Winston, Great story on the '65 Riv your Dad bought brand new. I'm sure that car is out there... somewhere. Perhaps one day you'll be reunited with it. I've always loved 1st Gen Rivieras painted white. Very classy. Happy New Year!
  6. Good story Winston. Is your dad's car the '65 you own today? What options did your dad special order from the factory? Love those old car stories...
  7. My guess, and a guess only, is that Buick changed to the larger Gran Sport emblems at the end of '64 to make the car more identifiable on the street. The GS option was almost $300, a fair chunk of change those days, so bolder brand identification was likely tried to boost sales. The UAW began a nationwide strike against GM on Sept 26, 1964, just as the new '65's were introduced, including the new Riviera Gran Sport. Here from a New York Times article published that day: The strike halted domestic vehicle production at General Motors, which had been turning out about 16,100 cars and 2,600 trucks daily. The company had produced about 300,000 of its 1965 models, which were introduced in dealer showrooms yesterday. About 125,000 of its 1964 models were still unsold at the dealers. A spokesman said General Motors dealers would probably run out of 1965 models in about 12 days and all cars in 18 to 20 days. This GM strike lasted until October 25, 1964. Perhaps the Buick marketing managers kept busy coming up with ways to spur sales once production resumed after the strike. Bolder branding of the Riviera GS was probably a result, including the larger "Gran Sport" emblems.
  8. Actually, that pedal is called the "Parking Brake". It is not really intended as an emergency brake, but of course can help bring the car to a stop in an emergency. However, note that our Rivieras are 2-ton vehicles, so don't expect a single set of rear brake shoes without hydraulic assist to stop the car very quickly. The braking system of most cars is designed so the front brakes carry about 70% of the stopping force, so the rear brakes, while better than nothing, aren't going to be very effective. How do I know? I had a total brake failure in my '65 Gran Sport in 2014 when driving home from the ROA meet in Monterey, CA. I was doing 70mph along I-5 entering Portland, Oregon when my brake pedal went to the floor - NOTHING!! A brief flash of panic ensued and then I thought - "What can I do"? I first shifted down from Drive into 2nd, using the engine compression to slow the car as I exited the freeway. The off-ramp led uphill, so I had a further assist from gravity. Once the car had slowed to about 30mph I dropped her into 1st. Only then did I judiciously apply the parking brake (AKA emergency brake) to bring the car to a full stop, luckily in a gas station! I determined the cause of brake failure to be a pinhole in the brake line running above the rear axle, as the MC was bone dry. I simply filled the reservoir back up, pumped the brakes and Back in Action! I would lose fluid with each brake application, but managed to get home to Vancouver BC by refilling the reservoir periodically. Another very handy use of the parking brake is while driving in snow. If your wheels lock up going downhill on a slope and the car starts to slide sideways then use the parking brake to lock up the rear wheels only. This will enable you to maintain directional control of the vehicle because the front wheels will continue to roll. I used that trick more than once to get me and the Riviera out of trouble in snow/ice.
  9. Actually, that pedal is called the "Parking Brake". It is not really intended as an emergency brake, but of course can help bring the car to a stop in an emergency. However, note that our Rivieras are 2-ton vehicles, so don't expect a single set of rear brake shoes without hydraulic assist to stop the car very quickly. The braking system of most cars is designed so the front brakes carry about 70% of the stopping force, so the rear brakes, while better than nothing, aren't going to be very effective. How do I know? I had a total brake failure in my '65 Gran Sport in 2014 when driving home from the ROA meet in Monterey, CA. I was doing 70mph along I-5 entering Portland, Oregon when my brake pedal went to the floor - NOTHING!! A brief flash of panic ensued and then I thought - "What can I do"? I first shifted down from Drive into 2nd, using the engine compression to slow the car as I exited the freeway. The off-ramp led uphill, so I had a further assist from gravity. Once the car had slowed to about 30mph I dropped her into 1st. Only then did I judiciously apply the parking brake (AKA emergency brake) to bring the car to a full stop, luckily in a gas station! I determined the cause of brake failure to be a pinhole in the brake line running above the rear axle, as the MC was bone dry. I simply filled the reservoir back up, pumped the brakes and Back in Action! I would lose fluid with each brake application, but managed to get home to Vancouver BC by refilling the reservoir periodically. Another very handy use of the parking brake is while driving in snow. If your wheels lock up going downhill on a slope and the car starts to slide sideways then use the parking brake to lock up the rear wheels only. This will enable you to maintain directional control of the vehicle because the front wheels will continue to roll. I used that trick more than once to get me and the Riviera out of trouble in snow/ice.
  10. Thanks guys for your comments on valve cover gaskets. Sounds like cork or rubber will work. I might try the Fel-Pro rubber ones this time, for a change. Cheers,
  11. Anyone have a recommendation for valve cover gaskets to use on a 425 Super Wildcat engine? Mine has the stock aluminum valve covers. Presently the car has cork gaskets, which are starting to leak. I want to replace the gaskets, and refinish the valve covers. But wonder if there's a better valve cover gasket to use than cork. I've seen silicone rubber w/ steel core type gaskets (Fel-Pro) used to good effect on small block Chevy engines. Is there anything similar available for nailhead motors? Thanks,
  12. The front grille on my '65 is in good shape, no broken tabs and the chrome is still bright. But, 54 years on the silver paint inside the fins needs repainting. I don't want to remove the grille from the car to refinish it. I removed the grille once. That involved a lot of cussing, so I'm not eager to risk damaging the grille or the surrounding paint to repaint its insides. Has anyone repainted the silvering inside the grille while it's still on the car? How did you go about it? Lastly, what rattle-can paint is the correct match for the OEM finish? Thanks,
  13. Nice car, well bought. It does look a bit 'jacked up' at the rear. Maybe due to new springs, or air shocks pumped up?
  14. Great result, despite the tribulations. I hope you'll enjoy your newly minted Gran Sport for many years and miles to come!