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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. As I recall it is pretty simple to reinstall a generator, but there are two very big things to watch out for. Removing the generator alone should not change the timing since the generator drive gear stays in place AS LONG AS you keep the generator mounting plate in place on the crankcase. If you remove the generator mounting plate, the drive gear will fall off into the engine, and if you turn the crank at all, you could mess up timing. If the chain remains on the cam gear and crankshaft gear, it should not throw it off, though. But by this time you need to take either the oil pan off, or th
  2. I'll let others correct my mistakes, but here's my opinion: >>1. How did cars built in 1925 start? Electric start, crank? How did these work? By 1925 all cars had electric start. Ford still has crank-only as an option but I doubt many were sold without electric start. The mechanism was mostly similar to what we have today --- a separate starter working on a ring ear on the flywheel, plus a separate generator to recharge the battery. They operation of the starter was a little different than today in that the ignition key energized the circuit, but to actuate the starter you needed to t
  3. Boy, what a lovely way to tour Scandinavia: Buy the Franklin, go on a nice long vacation, then ship it back to the States and bring it to the Trek along with the photo album. Would make a nice evening slide presentation. Of course, this would be done in June. . . . you can drive almost 24 hours a day up there that time of year !
  4. Wow. You are good. That kind of talent is remarkable. Thanks for sharing with us. --Scott
  5. Congrats on the Zephyr. These are great cars with very interesting history. Read up on Edsel Ford. . . On the engine, of the 12 or so pre-War cars I've owned (not Zephyrs), 10 had "rebuilt" engines, or so said the seller. Of those 10, zero were actually rebuilt. It seems that the definition of "rebuilt" varies from full bearings-rebore-valves down to "change the oil and new spark plugs". Unless the seller provided you with documented proof who did the rebuild and exactly what was done, do not assume that the engine is ready to cruise. At the very least, drop the oil pan, clean the sludge
  6. This is an old thread, so perhaps this has all been beaten to death, but. . . Has anyone tried to mount an overdrive right into the torque tube? Mitchell makes an overdrive which Model A Fords use that way --- they just weld it into the torque tube. Even Ford V8's. GearVendors makes another which you could use. I've never seen these things up close but figure they could be done for Buicks as well. Would make Special into a pretty nifty highway car. --Scott
  7. Hey guys --- Newby question here: When you are looking at a 1936 Buick, how can you tell if the car is a Century or a Special without measuring the wheelbase or length of the engine or other numerical stuff. The car doesn't actually say "Century" on it anywhere like the later ones, does it? If not, are there little things you can look for to tell you which model it is? Thanks -- Scott
  8. I have a set of four wide white wall 600x21" tires for sale. These include the tubes and the flaps. They are still in good shape. Lots of tread left; rubber is soft and pliable. Tubes were all good when removed. The only detraction is the white walls are beginning to deteriorate but they should clean up to look a lot better they they are now. The tires are Lester rib tread and about 30 years old, but because they are Made in USA they are still in quite good shape. New tires are $299 each, flaps $27, tubes $29 (Lester website). I'd like $400 for all four tires, flaps and tubes. Plus
  9. Concerning the inner tubes on a 700x21 tire, I checked and when I ran 700x21's on my Packard I did indeed use the smaller inner tubes which are listed on the Universal website. The ones listed as F19/20. They worked fine --- never had a flat. --Scott
  10. Open to offers on the tires. I'd like to move them out of my garage.
  11. I got the 700x21" tires from Universal on two occasions --- back in about 2002 and again in around 2009 when they wore out. (I drove the car alot). Here's the website: https://www.universaltire.com/700-21-firestone-blackwall.html Or give them a call. According to the website they do seem to be available however they might not be exactly 700x21" tubes. Sometimes a smaller tube can be used which could be what they are referring to here. But I would prefer the correct size if you can get it. I can't recall now if I used the full sized tube or a smaller one. Be sure that you use flaps. Happy
  12. I have a set of four wide white wall 600x21" tires for sale. These include the tubes and the flaps. The set came off a 1926 Packard when I put the correct size tires on, and these are still in good shape. Lots of tread left; rubber is soft and pliable. Tubes were all good when removed. The only detraction is the white walls are beginning to deteriorate. The tires are Lester rib tread and about 30 years old, but because they are Made in USA, they are still in quite good shape. New tires are $299 each, flaps $27, tubes $29 (Lester website). I'd like $500 for all four tires, flaps and t
  13. I have a set of four wide white wall 600x21" tires for sale. These include the tubes and the flaps. The set came off a 1926 Packard when I put the correct size tires on, and these are still in good shape. Lots of tread left; rubber is soft and pliable. Tubes were all good when removed. The only detraction is the white walls are beginning to deteriorate. The tires are Lester rib tread and about 30 years old, but because they are Made in USA, they are still in quite good shape. New tires are $299 each, flaps $27, tubes $29 (Lester website). I'd like $500 for all four tires, flaps and tube
  14. Does anyone know of a shop which can balance a driveshaft from an antique car? This car also has about a ten-inch diameter (3-1/2" wide) cast iron brake drum at the front that I'd also like balanced as a unit with the driveshaft. My local shop can't (or doesn't want to) do the job, so I'm stuck. The other question is, is there a way to dynamically balance these things at home? I've heard about the hose-clamp method but that's alot of guesswork and the driveshaft is still on the car. It hasn't worked well for me. Has anyone come up with a clever way to achieve dynamic balancing in your o
  15. I was not aware of the flywheel differences. Thanks for the clarification. One thing to know about the two clutches, the Borg and Beck is a very smooth acting clutch. The Merchants and Evans tends to be grabby. The Service Bulletins of the day warned about this and instructed owners to simply "get used to it". I recall driving Frank Gardner's 10-C with a M&E clutch and indeed, the thing really was tough to get used to. The other thing about Merchants and Evans is that the risk of breaking a rear axle might be higher with that clutch because of its tendency to grab. My 10-B, which i
  16. Are you sure? If you need it for a 10-B, the rigid clutch disk was long since abandoned and that's one of the reasons why they called the improved car 10-B. And I find it very hard to believe that Franklin would use an entirely different flywheel because they had to retrofit a great many 10-A cars with the flexible disk. Just because the flywheel may be different for some subtle reason, doesn't mean the clutch housing is also different. You will be hard pressed to find a rigid disk anyway unless the one used in a Series 9B happens to fit. Besides, you probably don't want to run the car on
  17. This really frightens me. Even in my modern car I try to do the speed limit and it seems that everyone, on superhighways or country roads, is going 10 or 20 mph above the speed limit. And when driving my antiques I always get people tailgating me six feet from my bumper. My fear is that even though we antique car people have millions of perfectly safe miles, all it will take is one well publicized accident and we will be legislated off the roads. My big peeve is that the speed limit is a speed LIMIT. It is not a MINIMUM speed as you would think the way people drive. A speed limit is a MA
  18. Gee, I can't believe no one has responded yet. . . . And Hershey information is not even on the Club website. OK, as far as i remember, "Franklin Row" at Hershey is on the Red field, the far upper right field, above Chocolate World and the old Stadium near Airport Road. And I think the spaces are in the vicinity of something like RNE-10. There are several Franklin people in that spot, including the official Franklin Club information. If you walk around that area, you can't miss it. That section of the Red field is pretty small, so just "stroll around the grounds until you feel at home.
  19. Your collection looks like mostly modern era cars. Owning a Franklin could allow you the experience to broaden your horizons to other eras, notably the 1920's. There is a huge difference in the feel and driving experience of early 1920's cars versus later 1920's cars. Franklins before the classic era, roughly 1925, were light weight, very nimble, had tight steering, and were simple to work on and maintain. Yet as others have said, they have a good power to weight ratio (and braking to weight ratio) because they are light in weight. They are quite comfortable at 40-45 mph if you live some
  20. Quick thought --- I had an 11-A for a number of years which exhibited the same problem on occasion. Depending on how warm it is, depending on the gasoline you are using, depending on if the float in your carburetor needs adjustment, depending on the valve adjustment . . . . What happened to me was simply vapor lock. When the engine is shut off with the engine hot from running, it often was difficult to restart. Even the old-time books described this, and Franklin did as well for the Series 9. When shutting off a hot engine, gasoline "builds up" in the carburetor creating a super-rich
  21. I used to be able to search all cars for sale on e-Bay and just list them from oldest to newest. In fact, I used to be able to do a search for any make of car MINUS the stuff I was not interested in like -bucket -hotrod -rat -deuce. It seems they have changed their site (again) and now you need to put in a specific car name in order to search. You can't search "any make" and sort by year. The fun of it was seeing what would come up from brass era to whatever, even though I do look at certain cars. Has anyone figured out a way to search by year for all cars on the "new and improved" e-Ba
  22. I owned a 1926 Packard 236 Phaeton for about ten years and during all of that time I drove it with a Mitchell overdrive. I highly recommend an overdrive versus high speed gears simply because the OD preserves the original ratios yet gives you the extra gear for cruising. In my hilly country around western New England, that was the ideal set-up --- original 3rd for hills yet overdrive for the flats. Packards are powerful, especially the 443, but they are also heavy cars. A high speed gear would not have been my best choice. And with the Mitchell or any "gear spliter" overdrive, every transm
  23. >>Early this year we tore the transmission apart on my 9b Franklin because one of the bearings was noisy.. . . Then I took the car to the Trek. It would not stay in second gear on those steep New York hills. Hi Bill --- Nice to see you at the Trek and especially the Series 9 . . . . the ONLY Series 9 to show up. I am rebuilding the transmission on my 10-B right now, so what I encounter does not necessarily translate to a Series 9 transmission, but alot of it probably does. I have not seen Service Charts for Series 9 so I can't speak to them specifically. You do want RADIAL THRUST bal
  24. Hi all --- Not sure where to begin looking, but this is a start. Perhaps someone can give a reference. Someone in the midwest bought a set of bound Horseless Age magazines from the Bill Pollock collection of Pottstown, PA back around 2009. These came from Becky DeStafano after her husband Ralph passed away. Becky tells me these volumes began around 1899 with volume 4 and continued through Volume 25, 1910. I recently acquired from an estate in Binghamton, NY similar Horseless Age bound volumes. Mine are Volumes 1,2 and 3. So I do have Horseless Age number one, the inaugural issue.
  25. Hi all --- Not sure where to begin looking, but this is a start. Perhaps someone can give a reference. Someone in the midwest bought a set of bound Horseless Age magazines from the Bill Pollock collection of Pottstown, PA back around 2009. These came from Becky DeStafano after her husband Ralph passed away. Becky tells me these volumes began around 1899 with volume 4 and continued through Volume 25, 1910. I recently acquired from an estate in Binghamton, NY similar Horseless Age bound volumes. Mine are Volumes 1,2 and 3. So I do have Horseless Age number one, the inaugural issue. It see
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