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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Still looking for Blue Crown 76-comm. These are 7/8" plugs. --Scott
  2. Good point --- I really don't want a huge truck if I only need it to tow once or twice a year. My car weighs less than 3000 pounds, and if I use an open trailer like a Featherlite, it's a fairly easy package. Question is: Can I tow with a 4.6 liter V-6? I've always thought that the V-6 was a low torque engine not capable of towing, but this F-150 I came across has a towing capacity of 8800 pounds, which seems highly optimistic. --Scott
  3. On the tow vehicle. . . . Does anyone ever tow with a manual transmission? Or is the slipping of the clutch just too much when you are loaded up? I'd really prefer a manual. . . just a lot more fun. (It's a guy-thing). --Scott
  4. Not exactly original pistons, but replacement pistons which were not fitted properly. The previous guy who did the engine work wasn't too knowledgeable on 1920's engines, let alone Franklin air cooled. I had new bearings made for the mains and rods, and in looking over the cylinders discovered that the clearances were set up too tight for my comfort. While it's apart, if I could find someone to hone them in to the correct clearance, it makes sense to get it done right.
  5. Thanks for your advice, guys. Yeah, this is the way we learn. Screw up, then figure out what we did wrong. So now I know the difference between honing and glaze breaking, and the proper tools for each. And then when we've finally got it all figure out, we die. :-) But this is fun stuff. Thanks again. --Scott
  6. I should add that I am using a three-armed spring-loaded hone/glaze breaker. Yeah, it's the cheap one at under $30. So my question is, can a glaze breaker like this remove 0.001 to 0.002" of metal in a cylinder, or is it not designed to do that? Continued poking around on the net tells me that a hone and a glaze breaker are two different things. True? --Scott
  7. I'm getting a little frustrated so I thought I'd throw this out. I've been measuring the bores of my Franklin cylinders with a telescoping bore gauge and a micrometer. I hate the thing. I get a different number every time and the only way I get an idea of the true diameter is to take LOTS of measurements and use statistics to throw away bad data and take an average of the rest. Other than the several hundred dollar bore gauges, is there any other way to measure cylinder bores? Second, I've been advised to hone the cylinders out anywhere from 0.001 to 0.002" for a better clearance. HO
  8. No -- wish it could but perhaps that's not reasonable to expect. I figure a good clean reliable truck for the $5k mark, then I need to look around for a trailer. Haven't gotten that far yet, but I don't want something hugely bigger than I need for this car. --Scott
  9. >>I'd look for a 2001+ or so GM 2500HD single rear wheel with the 8.1 gas engine (6.0 can do it too, but for as little as you'd drive it, the power would be worth it). Good suggestion, but why 2001 or newer? Anything wrong or to watch out for on the older truck? And I live in the northeast near southwestern Vermont. I don't mind buying a truck/car in a less-salty southern climate and driving it home. Rust is the main killer up here. --Scott
  10. Hi all ---- My little 1995 Toyota pickup is nearing the end of life and I recently bought a brass car which I'd like to be able to trailer to meets. So it's time to get a new truck, and now capable of towing. Any recommendations on what to buy? I've never had a big tow vehicle before. Considerations: --The brass car is about 2800 pounds. 15 feet long. --I'd like to have an enclosed trailer. --I'd like to keep the cost down. Way down. Maybe $5000. I don't need comfort or gadgets, just reliability. --I don't commute to work, so the truck will only be used for occasional trips to the st
  11. Hi all --- Anyone have a recommendation or advice on buying a car in England and having it shipped to the USA? The car is an American-made brass era car, coming from southwestern UK (Cornwall) and going to New England (Boston or New York ports). I'm pretty much looking for someone to handle the whole thing, customs and dealing with transport. I can get the car to a UK port, and might be able to pick it up at a USA port, but in between is the question. Thanks very much ! --Scott
  12. Hi all --- as the subject says, I am looking for a speedometer cable which would fit a Series 10 and 11, maybe a Series 12. My car came with the speedometer but the cable got lost over the years. This cable mounts onto the right rear of the transmission and runs under the floor boards, up the firewall and to the speedometer head on the right side of the dashboard. It is about 4 feet long with a 3/4-20 screw nut to mount onto the transmission. Any help much appreciated . Thanks --- Scott
  13. The rims from Universal were the 4mm version. The 3mm type was in the correct original width (2.76 inches) but they called back and said that they were out of stock or something (I forget) but said that the 3mm was a marginal thickness anyway. He recommended the 4mm thickness which came in at slightly wider than original (2.83 inches) . I agreed, bought them, and found they are slightly wider but still work out fine. If anything it gives a "firmer" wider profile to the tire, and the mounting was not effected. They look good on the car -- give it a beefier appearance without being oversize
  14. It's for a 1924 Franklin. I could try to post a photo. . . But it would be great if someone had a spare. I suppose they fit many cars of the 1920's. Speed dial above, odometer to the left below that with trip-meter to the right. Drive cable comes out the bottom. Mostly I need a cable, though, as that's missing. It appears to be about 4 feet long and driven from the rear of the transmission. --Scott
  15. I should finish this thread by saying that I did get it figured out. The key ---- the ABSOLUTE secret --- is to use plenty of lubrication to slide the rubber onto the rim. It's astounding how well dry rubber sticks to the rim. A little lubricant makes a world of difference. Takes me maybe ten minutes to do a tire now with a decent rim spreader. I used a paste-like substance called (something like) Euro paste or Euro Lube. The guy talked me into it at the auto parts store. I'd have to look at the thing again for the exact name, but it really did work very well. It's an glycol-based lubri
  16. I have a 1920's Stewart speedometer with the rotating numbers --- not a needle. Actually, I have parts of at least three, none of which are good, from which I am looking for someone to do a repair/restoration to give me one good unit. Can anyone recommend a good, reliable speedometer repair shop who is knowledgeable on 1920's speedometers? Thanks --- Scott
  17. Hi all --- Shopping around for a truck and came across a 1996 Dodge 2500 Cummins diesel. The truck has 200,000 miles on it but is in a rust-free southern climate. I'd fly out to drive it home. I've no experience with diesels nor the Dodge Ram, but is 200,000 a lot of miles for this truck? Or are they good for a lot more? I want to find something closer to 100,000 miles but the budget doesn't allow. Thanks
  18. Thanks for your help, Franklin31 --- much appreciated. Yes, I looked up Service Station 113 and saw the write-up on split rims. I had to laugh because Tim spends a lot of time on removing the tire and mounting the new tire, but quickly glosses over expanding the rim . That was the hardest part ! I could do everything else with ease, but it was that last 1/4 inch to lock the rim that blew me away... The other thing is Tim did not mention lubricating the tire and rim before mounting. Is that so obvious that it doesn't need to be mentioned? Well, I learned the hard way. I think it's essentia
  19. To follow up on shipping my engine parts to Minnesota, A couple of weeks after the engine was delivered I got a notice from Frieghtquote.com that my weight was revised to be DOUBLE what I declared. Estes Express raised my weight from the 270 pounds that I claimed to 515 pounds. (!!) With no explanation given, they billed my credit card directly for the extra amount, without my consent. Now 515 pounds for what I sent is absolutely absurd. I weighed it myself and got 250 pounds, then added 20 pounds for the crate material. If I was off, it was only maybe ten pounds. Freightquote has bee
  20. The key to this does seem to be to well lubricate the tire and flap. . . and the rim before using the spreader. I tried that using advice also given here, but dam. . . . it still didn't work well. Part of the problem is that the rim spreader does not apply pressure to the inside middle of the rim --- it's off to one side, so the rim locks on one side only. Then you need to flip the tire/rim the other way and try to force the other side to mate. And it is impossible using just a screwdriver or pry bar. What seemed to work was after getting one side of the rim together, I used a hydraulic
  21. I can dismount the rim and mount the new tire easily enough with the rim spreader. My problem is that last 1/4 inch of the rim ends overlap. There's nothing that seems to overcome that little bit of overlap. Any suggestions? I am really at wits end. I just can't do it ! -Scott
  22. Hi all -- I am mounting new tires to my 1924 Franklin. The car has 23" wheels using split rims. I have a rim spreader. The theory is to make the tire slip on easier to a collapsed rim, then expand it to normal size. But even with the rim spreader I worked on the thing for about a hour until I finally got it. And I've got three tires to go still ! Dam but that was hard. There's got to be a right way to do this but darned if I know what it is ! Any advice on WHERE to position the three arms of the rim spreader? Say if the split is at the 12 o'clock position, where do I want the three
  23. Hi all -- I am mounting new tires to my 1924 Franklin. The car has 23" wheels using split rims. I have a rim spreader. The theory is to make the tire slip on easier to a collapsed rim, then expand it to normal size. But even with the rim spreader I worked on the thing for about a hour until I finally got it. And I've got three tires to go still ! Dam but that was hard. There's got to be a right way to do this but darned if I know what it is ! Any advice on WHERE to position the three arms of the rim spreader? Say if the split is at the 12 o'clock position, where do I want the three arms
  24. Hi all --- I'd like to find a set of Blue Crown Husky spark plugs --- 76-comm. Looking for at least 8 but a box of ten would be nice. Two boxes would really make me happy. I'd buy 75-comm if they are available. The 76-comm is a hotter plug. Thanks --- Scott dwyers@rpi.edu
  25. I originated this thread and wanted to fill in on the end result. I went with Estes Trucking through freightquote.com. To Minneapolis the cost was $178, which was pretty reasonable. It would have cost me $400 in gas alone to drive out and back. That price included me bring the engine to the Estes terminal in Albany, NY and it being delivered to the shop which had a fork lift. I will advise that you can't crate the engine too well. I was fixated on weight since originally I wanted to send it UPS and they have an upper limit, unless you use their freight service. So, using what was arou
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