scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Complete aluminum hood from a 1915 Franklin Series 8. Has air shrouding inside and original paint. No dents or damage save for two tiny seam separations near corners. Ready to clean up and repaint. Photos provided on request. Shipping possible but could be expensive due to size. $500. Troy, New York Contact: Scott at dwyers@rpi.edu
  2. Could someone give me an assessment of the work which would come out of this shop --- J&J Restorations in Canton, GA ? Looking at their website, they look like a modern car service garage, but they claim that they do old cars as well. Seems their scope is a little more broad than I'd expect from a genuine classic car shop. Has anyone had engine work on a pre-war Packard, Cadillac, Lincoln or similar car done by these folks? Could you recommend their work? Reply privately if you'd rather not post to the public. Thanks --- Scott
  3. Matt Harwood recommends an overdrive based on his experience. Matt, you have one in a Cadillac? And doesn't Cadillac have a torque tube? If a car has a torque tube like a Cadillac or Lincoln, how would the overdrive be installed? I assume the torque tube would be removed and a section cut out, then the overdrive installed. Is that so? I'm aware of Gear Vendors and have used a Mitchell on a Packard. Could you send your whole torque tube to either of these people and expect that they would install the overdrive for you? Then it seems that you could just reinstall the new OD Torque Tube.
  4. Since Phil Bray has been gone for a while, I am wondering if there is still a source for high speed gears for cars of the late 1920's and 1930's? I'm thinking for cars like Packard, Lincoln, Buick, Cadillac, etc. without needing to spend the big bucks to make just one ring and pinion.
  5. Is anyone familiar with or has anyone bought a car through a consignment dealer called "Classic Car Deals" located in Cadillac, Michigan up near Traverse City? http://www.classiccardeals.com/Default.aspx They have a car listed which I am interested in, but I experienced a rather "odd" phone conversation with someone with a lot of what seemed "canned" background noise. But what was of concern was that I think they didn't want to let me speak to the car's owner or give me his location until I paid them $1000 as a refundable deposit. Frankly, before I give anyone money, I need to know the car exists and the owner is a real person in a real place. Too many scams around to just toss around a Grand.
  6. >> It is understandable to want tours, publications etc from the club you pay your annual does to, but sometimes you have to "give back" even if it only with advice on how to do something , and not just sit back and wait to be entertained . Walt knows me and knows that I've "given back" to the Franklin Club a lot over the 35-some years I've been involved. I've never been one to just take, and trust that Walt's comments were not directed at me but voiced in general. Anyone who participates should feel an obligation to contribute. If the CCCA is serious about not only admitting pre-1925 cars to the ranks but organizing tours for them, I would very much like to organize a tour in the Albany, NY--western VT--western MA area. This is a beautiful part of the country with miles of great roads that I usually drive on all alone. Let's see if we can get some interest in 1916-1930 cars generated. But first, back to that Twin Six. . . .
  7. I appreciate the suggestions to contact Roster Keepers, and yes I do know Tim and others. With all respects to the Roster Keepers, and they are many, the Roster Keepers keep the roster. They aren't technical specialists. Tim knows the car I am interested in but did not suggest that he knew anything about the mechanical aspects of Twin Sizes --- the first versus second versus third series. Is there a Twin Six expert in the world today? I knew Brad Skinner of Bartlesville, Oklahoma years ago. He was THE Twin Six expert. But he's been gone for some time. Is there anyone who can really give honest, unbiased advice on the merits and cautions of the various Twins? I'd also like to know what people are doing to keep, say, the first and second series on the road. The carburetor in that tight "V" is a problem, but I can't believe that it is insurmountable. How about heat shielding? How about gasoline re-circulation? How about ducting cool air to the carburetor? Is anyone actually driving a Twin Six these days or are they all museum pieces?
  8. I had heard that CCCA extended it's eligibility to certain earlier cars. Whereas I agree this is a good thing to recognize some fine makes prior to 1925, Packard included, I have to wonder if the CCCA will host tours which are amenable to these earlier cars? Or will the early cars be touring with the 1941 Cadillacs? I ask this because I used to belong to the CCCA. I owned a 1926 Packard 8 Phaeton at the time, but I never felt that I could take the car on a CCCA tour. The tours seemed to involve high speed highways and distances which were perfectly fine for 1940s Packards and Cadillacs and similar, but would not be appropriate for a car with a comfortable cruising speed in the low 40 mph range. I'd like to see the CCCA host a pre-1930 tour to encourage people owning these earlier cars to join the club and participate. Are they doing that now? Could someone clue me in? I'd love to join if I felt welcome.
  9. Concerning HCCA eligibility, I think that HCCA tours accept cars manufactured in the 1915 calendar year. So the only eligible Twin Sixes could be a 1916 first series. And I think that Packard announced the Twin Six in something like May 1915, so a good number were built in 1915. I've seen photos in the Gazette of a few 1st Series Twins on tours, and the HCCA roster lists a few Twin Sixes which presumably fit that criteria. Good advice on the brakes. Probably a sound reason to have new tires on the rear, especially ,to get as much new, soft rubber gripping the road as possible.
  10. I think that HCCA tours accept cars manufactured in the 1915 calendar year. So the only eligible Twin Sixes could be a 1916 first series. And I think that Packard announced the Twin Six in something like May 1915, so a good number were built in 1915. I've seen photos in the Gazette of a few 1st Series Twins on tours, and the HCCA roster lists a few Twin Sixes which presumably fit that criteria. Good advice on the brakes. Probably a sound reason to have new tires on the rear, especially ,to get as much new, soft rubber gripping the road as possible.
  11. Well, I looked and I couldn't find a previous post specific to a 1932. Perhaps someone could just answer the guy's question without giving him the brush-off.
  12. Hi all --- I have the opportunity to acquire a Packard Twin Six. This car is a 1916 1st Series 5-p Phaeton, older restoration that should be tour ready save for maintenance to wake it up after five years disuse. Can anyone tell me if these make good tour cars ? Could anyone share their opinions if they are fairly robust and reliable, or if they have weaknesses or major mechanical faults which are coming evident after 100 years? Or are they just plain great cars? When I look it over, what should I look for or beware of? Where are the Achilles Heels? Anything you could share to help me be a more knowledgeable buyer will be much appreciated. Thanks -- Scott
  13. Hi all --- I have the opportunity to acquire a Packard Twin Six. This car is a 1916 1st Series 5-p Phaeton, older restoration that should be tour ready save for maintenance to wake it up after five years disuse. Can anyone tell me if these make good tour cars ? Could anyone share their opinions if they are fairly robust and reliable, or if they have weaknesses or major mechanical faults which are coming evident after 100 years? Or are they just plain great cars? When I look it over, what should I look for or beware of? Where are the Achilles Heels? Anything you could share to help me be a more knowledgeable buyer will be much appreciated. Thanks -- Scott
  14. I've never understood why someone puts such a ridiculous price on a car they are trying to sell. It surely does not do them any good. I suppose this person was told that their car was worth a King's ransom and they are only trying to milk it for all it's worth. I recently inquired about a Packard which is for sale, and the seller told me likewise some totally fantastic price. I asked how he came to that figure and he said it was appraised for that much. It's so unfortunate that appraisers usually give the customer what they want to hear rather than realistic market values. Maybe they do it for insurance purposes. . . . I don't know. Maybe they cite ads of cars for sale but not the actual selling price. But it certainly hurts a lot of people. I told the Packard guy that a realistic price based on auction results was literally half his asking price. He did not reply. I like a 10-C and especially a 10-C Sedan. That car looks nicely done cosmetically, but I won't even inquire until the seller comes back to Earth.
  15. I don't think Franklin ever made a Series 11 Convertible Coupe. Someone correct me if I am mistaken.
  16. >>We are not talking about using leftover house paint and a roller. We are talking about the kind of finish many cars had from the factory prior to the introduction of nitrocellulose lacquer in the late 20s. So good point ---- suppose someone did want to try to replicate the brushed-on paint of the pre-lacquer days. Brush on, wet sand, second coat, etc, then wet sand and polish. What kind of paint would you use for this?
  17. What kind of paint is used these days? Say, to paint something like a 1920's car. I assume lacquer is no more. Are acrylic enamels still used? Or is it all base coat-clear coat?
  18. Hi All --- I'm curious as to the feasibility of painting or repainting a 1920's touring car, a big car like a Cadillac. It's a car that I'd like to buy. The car is in good presentable shape with an older paint which is probably lacquer as a guess. The problem is that it was painted in not the most complimentary color scheme. If it were darker, like a dark green and black fenders, I think it would look a whole lot better, at least to me. So two questions: 1) Can this be done reasonably well by somehow prepping, sealing and painting over the existing paint? Or does the car really need to be taken down to bare metal? The idea is to not have a ton of money into the project, if possible. 2) If you do need to strip it bare and start from the ground up, any guesses what the cost would be these days? I've had this done on a few cars but the last time was 1987, so the world has changed a bit since then. Thanks for any advice.
  19. I am planning a car hauling trip from Arizona to Boston at some point. I don't have a lot of road trip experience so I'm wondering. . . . . Those of you who do, what motel chains do you usually look for, for reliably good experiences at reasonable rates? I need places close to interstates with large enough parking for a Chevy 3500 Dually and 22 foot trailer. I ask because I really don't want to take the crap shoot when it's dark and I'm tired an ready for sleep. I want to have reservations all ready and just pull in.
  20. Hi again --- I'm the original poster of the '14 Cadillac question. Thanks to all for your interesting replies. They are helpful. (Congrats to Ed for losing 150 pounds !!) A little background, since some have asked: I have owned two 1914 Franklins over the years, as well as a few brass Model T's. I've had several 1920's cars and the most modern car I've owned was a '38 Packard (which did sell, as Steve Mack inquired. Yeah, I thought it was a good deal and so does the new owner. Nice when it works out well for both. ). Anyway, I've always like the four-cylinder Cadillacs, especially the '14s, but have never owned or driven one. I recently sold two cars and am looking for something else. As I mentioned, there is a '14 available that has not been advertised, but there are also other cars available that I like. I wish I could fill a big garage and as my moods change, simply drive something else. But I can only own one at a time (maybe two), so before writing a big check I wanted your opinions on the Cadillac. Please continue the thread if you've something more to say. Obviously this discussion is helping other people, too. Thanks !
  21. Hi All --- I'm thinking about buying a 1914 Cadillac. Not having owned a 4-cylinder Cadillac, wonder what the experience would be like. What are they like to drive and maintain? Are they good for long distance driving? Are they good in hilly country? If you've ever owned one or have experience with one and care to share your thoughts, they would be welcome. Good experiences or bad, good cars or lacking in some respects? Thanks for whatever you can share.
  22. This has probably been said, so apologies for repeating, but the best advice is simply to give your stuff away once you get to the point where you can't enjoy it anymore. The reason is that while you are alive, you can do whatever you want with your cars and money. Once you are dead, it can become a huge battle ground of contested wills and hurt feelings and burdens for those you leave behind. I was associated with a start-up museum where the founder left his cars and so-much money to endow the museum. Sounds simple, but even before he died unknown relatives came out of the woodwork to try to get their paws on Uncle Tim's money. And after he died came the contesting of the will. It took two years in the courts to sort it out, and the attorneys took a huge portion of the money. Give it away while you are still alive. You enjoyed it for all these years, now enjoy the satisfaction of helping a young fellow by giving him a car or parts or tools and being around for a while to also give advice and fellowship.
  23. Hi All --- I'm new to Ford V8's and have one question to start. I like the 1936's and have looked at a few open cars for sale --- Phaeton and Convertible Sedan. Is the front seat movable on these? Can you move it back some to allow more room for the driver? On the Phaetons I've seen, there appear to be three wood screws holding the body to the seat back. It looks like you could re-position the seat that way. If so, is that true for the Convertible Sedan as well? I ask because I once drove a 1934 Phaeton that was so very cramped in the driver's seat that the car was all but undriveable for me. The 1936's I'm interested in are a little too far away to check out if they have the same problem as that '34 did. Any help appreciated. Thanks -- Scott
  24. To be more specific, yes the car I am interested in is a 1913 Model 69, as the above post addressed so well. Thank you. What I am looking for is as close to the kind of reliability that a Model T might bring but in something a little bigger, a little better ride, a little more quality than a T. Nothing against Model T's ---- I've owned four over the years. But they are Model T's. . . . . small, hard ride, etc. If anyone else can share their 1913 Overland experiences, I'd appreciate your thoughts. But also. . . . Maybe I can expand this question a little --- if I guy wanted a 1912-1914 brass car and wanted something other than a Model T, like I said above, what would you recommend he look for? Budget in the brass-T category.
  25. Could someone give me a little lesson the durability, reliability, quality and drive-ability of brass-era Overlands? I've never owned one and don't know much about them. But weren't they a fairly large producer at the time and sort of a competition to the Model T in the low priced class? Do they make good tour cars today? Better than a Model T, or is a Model T the better choice year for year ? Are parts a problem? Do things break or wear out due to manufacturing design flaws? Apologies for being pretty ignorant here !. .... Thanks