scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Hi all, Does anyone know if there is a website, book or other source of information on the Simplex or the Crane Simplex? I believe that the "Crane" Simplex was built from about 1915 through WWI, and that the six cylinder engine was 4-3/8" x 6-3/4" (BIG!) but I can't find any detailed information on Google.com. There's only one reference in Automobile Quarterly, too. (That I own) Thanks, Scott
  2. It's not a good idea to start with a small spark plug gap and allow it to "wear in" to 0.031". I used to believe that and did it for years on my modern car. The reason is that when the electrode wears, is rounds off. It's much better to have a sharp, square electrode. This provides a stronger electric field and hotter spark. That's why you sometimes see in the old repair manuals the suggestion to file the electrode flat. It made a great difference in my modern car. --Scott
  3. I gapped them all myself to 0.031", as recommended by my owner's manual. Lower rpm likes a bigger gap, and since I run an overdrive, the engine never revvs that much. Here's something else: I had a very odd experience with this set of plugs. One plug (of eight) was not firing at all. When I pulled it out, the gap was nearly zero. I KNEW I gapped it correctly. Then I could see where the intake valve hit the end of the plug and closed it! The other plugs were not so effected. I need to check the valve clearance on that cylinder, but it's not hanging open because the car runs very smooth and powerfully. These Champions have a very long reach. From shoulder to tip of electrode: New Champion W-18 = 0.808". 60 year old Blue Crown Husky 76 Comm = 0.677" (Crossover lists tell me the Husky is one step hotter than a W18.) I'm just very thankful that the plug wasn't much longer or I could have bent the valve. I took the Champions back to NAPA and they refunded my money. I also bought a set of Autolite 7/8" plugs of comparable heat range. I'm going to run the Blue Crowns as long as they continue to work (they look nice), but since we don't know if the 7/8" plugs might cease production, I'll have something on the shelf. The Autolites were half the price of the Champions, too. --Scott --Scott
  4. A well respected friend has used Hastings spark plugs with good results. Are they still being manufactured? Anyone have a source, if so? --Scott
  5. When I bought the Champion W-18's at my local NAPA store, they did have one AC plug -- 7/8" in the same heat range. I bought the Champions simply because they had them in stock. Perhaps I should have them order seven more AC's. --Scott
  6. I put a brand new set of Champion W-18 spark plugs into my 1926 Packard. The engine started hard, idled somewhat roughly, but when I got onto the street, there was a severe intermittant miss on several cylinders. After 1/2 mile I got back home and found that at least four of the eight were firing irregularly (fouled, and after only 1/2 mile!) I replaced all the new Champions with my old set of Blue Crown Huskies (same heat range) and the car ran just fine -- smooth and powerful. Why?? I had this problem years ago on a Franklin, except I did not think it was due to spark plugs. After years of fiddling, I finally gave up in frustration. A spark plug is a simple enough device, isn't it? Now I believe that there's something about modern spark plugs that may not allow them to work on old ignition systems. (The Franklin had a magneto) Is there? Do modern plugs require voltages or currents far in excess of what antique ignition systems can produce? Anyone else have a bad experience with moden spark plugs? Just Champions? Or what? --Scott
  7. I put a brand new set of Champion W-18 spark plugs into my 1926 Packard. The engine started hard, idled somewhat roughly, but when I got onto the street, there was a severe intermittant miss on several cylinders. After 1/2 mile I got back home and found that at least four of the eight were firing irregularly (fouled, and after only 1/2 mile!) I replaced all the new Champions with my old set of Blue Crown Huskies (same heat range) and the car ran just fine -- smooth and powerful. Why?? I had this problem years ago on a Franklin, except I did not think it was due to spark plugs. After years of fiddling, I finally gave up in frustration. A spark plug is a simple enough device, isn't it? Now I believe that there's something about modern spark plugs that may not allow them to work on old ignition systems. (The Franklin had a magneto) Is there? Do modern plugs require voltages or currents far in excess of what antique ignition systems can produce? Anyone else have a bad experience with moden spark plugs? Just Champions? Or what? --Scott
  8. Hi, Can anyone recommend an appraiser for antique autombiles in the viscinity of Albany, NY? --Scott
  9. I don't understand gas and oil prices. The USA averages around $2.25 for gas, the UK around US$6.00 per USgallon, and many other countries higher than that, like Sweden is $7.00, etc. The recent rise is blamed on the "volatility of the oil markets". Fine. So who is making all the money? It's the same black goop coming out of the ground. There are about the same number of pumps to extract it. The refining process is roughly the same (there is some effect due to cleaner fuels). So if we're paying about double what it was a few years ago, WHO IS TAKING OUR MONEY??? Someone is getting filthy rich off our global wallets. And this will eventually destroy global economies. Remember, too, when oil prices rise, ALL fuel prices rise, so someday you will pay $2000 a month to heat your house in January. I'm afraid.... --Scott
  10. Hello, classic enthusiasts I own a 1926 Packard 2-36 Eight. How much should I tighten the cylinder head nuts? ie: What torque values should I tighten them to? Thanks, --Scott
  11. Hi, all I own a 1926 Eight cylinder Packard. How tight should I tighten the cylinder head nuts? ie: What torque value should I use? Thanks, and Happy Spring. --Scott Troy, NY
  12. Hi all, I have a Stewart Warner vacuum tank on my Packard and would like to have a gascolator to go with it. The gascolator is a glass bowled fuel filter that attaches directly to the fuel inlet on the vacuum tank lid. They are nice because not only do they provide some filtering, but you can watch the gas flow into the tank so you know it's working. Any ideas on where I can find one? Thanks, --Scott Troy, NY
  13. Hello, all What's involved in buying a car in Europe (Germany) and shipping it to the USA? The car is a large American car of the teens, brought to Germany in 1986 from Texas. Any recommendations on shipping companies? --Scott
  14. Hello out there, Could someone tell me the differences between the Locomobile Model 38 and Model 48 engines of the teens (1915/1916)? Or perhaps the differences between the Models in general? I'm especially interested in bore and strokes, but anything else is appreciated. I can't find much information on these cars. Thanks --- Scott
  15. Hello out there, Could someone tell me the differences between the Locomobile Model 38 and Model 48 engines of the teens (1915/1916)? Or perhaps the differences between the Models in general? I'm especially interested in bore and strokes, but anything else is appreciated. I can't find much information on these cars. Thanks --- Scott
  16. Hello, Could someone give me a lesson on Pierce Arrow brakes from the mid-1930's? I know that they are a vacuum operated system but that's about all I know. Are they reliable? Are they problematic? Looking at that little foot-shaped brake pedal does not instil a great deal of confidence for stopping a 5000 pound car. If one acquires a mid-1930's Pierce with the power brake system, and if the brakes work now, are the brakes something to be perpetually worried about? I've heard that when they fail, you have nothing. Pretty sobering thought... Thanks very much, --Scott
  17. Hello, Could someone give me a lesson on Pierce Arrow brakes from the mid-1930's? I know that they are a vacuum operated system but that's about all I know. Are they reliable? Are they problematic? Looking at that little foot-shaped brake pedal does not instill a great deal of confidence for stopping a 5000 pound car. If one acquires a mid-1930's Pierce with the power brake system, and if the brakes work now, are the brakes something to be perpetually worried about? I've heard that when they fail, you have nothing. Pretty sobering thought... Thanks very much, --Scott
  18. Happy New Year to all. How do I adjust the float level on a Packard carburetor from a 1926 eight? I know the original float adjustment on the needle is soldered in place, but I bought a modern needle and seat with a variable float level adjustment. The repair manual says "1/8 inch below the main jet". When I transfer that to the top of the float bowl, I can then rig up an outside sight tube to determine the level of gasoline. Using my measurements, that should be 1/2-inch below the top of the bowl. HOWEVER, the original needle gives a float level 1-1/4 inch below the top of the bowl! It may have been changed over the years, or not. I don't know. (The carburetor was never on my car. I'm running a Zenith presently.) What do they mean by "1/8-inch below the main jet"? What does that translate into below the top of the bowl or somewhere else I can actually see? The repair book says the same dimentions for six and eight cylinder cars. However, the six carburetor is entirely different, so it can't be right. Help please! --Scott 1926 Packard 2-36 Phaeton.
  19. Happy New Year to all. How do I adjust the float level on a Packard carburetor from a 1926 eight? I know the original float adjustment on the needle is soldered in place, but I bought a modern needle and seat with a variable float level adjustment. The repair manual says "1/8 inch below the main jet". When I transfer that to the top of the float bowl, I can then rig up an outside sight tube to determine the level of gasoline. Using my measurements, that should be 1/2-inch below the top of the bowl. HOWEVER, the original needle gives a float level 1-1/4 inch below the top of the bowl! It may have been changed over the years, or not. I don't know. (The carburetor was never on my car. I'm running a Zenith presently.) What do they mean by "1/8-inch below the main jet"? What does that translate into below the top of the bowl or somewhere else I can actually see? The repair book says the same dimentions for six and eight cylinder cars. However, the six carburetor is entirely different, so it can't be right. Help please! <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif" alt="" /> --Scott 1926 Packard 2-36 Phaeton.
  20. >>So then, in NY, the poor fellow with the 1928 "Porter" has to educate the inspecting mechanic on how his car works....plus pay a fee for the privilege of doing so? ..... >>It's a mad, mad, mad, mad world... The thing with emiussions tests that pisses me off is that the gubbamint is so worried about cars to the point of hassling antiques that are driven less than 1000 miles a year, yet they do absolutely nothing about commercial trucks, especially diesels. I was much aware of this when I commuted on a motorcycle. I'd say 95% of every commercial vehicle, espcially diesels, would belch thick clouds of black smoke. I'd need to pull off the road occasionally, it was so bad. Dump trucks, garbage trucks, even school busses. Why is there NO emissions requirement on diesels? The pollution from ONE diesel truck must equate to 100 passenger cars. A classic case of government looking the other way when it suits them. --Scott
  21. I failed to find "Hide Food" for leather conditioning at Hershey, much to my surprise. Looking around on the internet, I see "Hide Food" and "Hide Care". Some seem to be Connolly Leather products, others are not. Seems alot of imitators are using the name "Hide Food". If it says Connolly, that little green labled jar, is there a difference between "Hide Food" and "Hide Care"? Hide Food has always worked well for me, and I'm not keen to experiment. Also, recommendations on where to buy Hide Food? --Scott Troy, NY 1926 Packard
  22. What are the laws for getting an antique car inspection in the various states? (And Canadian provinces, for curiosity.) I know some states require none or just one inspection initially, while other states have inspections every six months. The requirements vary considerably. If I'm going to relocate someday, I'd like to go somewhere that doesn't give me a hassle every year on pre-1930 cars! In the meantime, I'm in New York State. I've been hassled, but never ultimately refused an inspection. You need to know the "right guy to go see". Most mechanics have no concept of a car with two wheel brakes, no turn signals, no air bags or seat belts or emission control systems. And New York just made it harder by requiring all inspectors to buy a multi-thousand dollar emissions tester, which put alot of the "right guys to go see", ie. small repair shops, out of the inspection business entirely. Advice appreciated. --Scott Troy, NY 1926 Packard
  23. I teach at a small college in upstate New York, and have a photograph of my 1926 236 Phaeton on my laptop computer. By far, there's no interest among the students (which is sad) but one kid did ask what kind of car it was. I said "Packard". He looked at me strangely: "Packar?". "No", I said. "PackarD!. Like Hewlett Packard". Then he understood. It's odd how what was arguably the most recognizable brand name in America equating to luxury and quality for so many years has all but disappeared from common language. --Scott