Jump to content

scott12180

Members
  • Content Count

    565
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by scott12180

  1. I never thought I would say anything good about New York, especially today with the rampant corruption in government and highest taxes in the USA . . . (sorry --- there I go again. Take your medicine, old man . . . There, there. . .all better) But, from the little I know, New York is relatively easy to register an old car. If you have a registration or title signed over to you by the previous owner, it's easy. If you don't, it can be a pain because every DMV clerk you talk to will demand different things or flat out say "no". There's no uniformity or mutual understanding. I knew the guy
  2. Yes it looks like a nice car, but what about that engine?? Is there any evidence at all that the engine has been apart or at least had the bearings replaced? It's being sold with a "resale rebuild", which is what I call taking a spray can and making the engine look as though it's been rebuilt. In all fairness, if I were a dealer, I would paint that engine, too, because it sure was ugly as you can see in some of the posted photos. But for $65,000 I would expect that it has a good, rebuilt engine. You may share your opinion if you disagree. Seriously, I'd like to know what you think a
  3. Hi All -- Does anyone out there own or have experience with a pre-1923 Cadillac V8, the models with the single-plane crankshaft? I've read that these engines produced a significant vibration at 2000 rpm, which is between 40-50 mph depending on the gearing. Practically, however, what are these like to drive? Are you really limited to speeds below 40 mph (for, say, an enclosed car) ? Is the vibration that bad? What I've read suggests that these cars are very limited in their driveability because of that, but would Henry Leland have designed a car that was so bad that it couldn't be driven ov
  4. Hi All -- Does anyone out there own or have exprerience with a pre-1923 Cadillac, the models with the single-plane crankshaft? I've read that these engines produced a significant vibration at 2000 rpm, which is between 40-50 mph depending on the gearing. Practically, however, what are these like to drive? Are you really limited to speeds below 40 mph? Is the vibration that bad? What I've read suggests that these cars are very limited because of that, but would Henry Leland have designed a car that was so bad that it couldn't be driven over 40 mph? I'd like to hear about your experiences.
  5. I think the first thing is to determine what your budget is. Then you need to determine how much work you can do yourself. Can you rebuild an engine? Do wood work? Do paint, upholstery? etc. Then to realize that buying a fully restored car is usually cheaper than buying a project car. The one advantage of a project is for a guy like you, or anyone who is young enough to be entering a period of increasing income over the next so-many years --- you can't afford a fully restored car now but you will be able to pick away at a project as you accumulate more disposable income. Old cars are
  6. "New worms are in process....... it will be interesting to see how they turn out. I'll let you know in a few weeks." New worms will be available for which cars? --Scott
  7. Hi --- I keep getting confused. . . If a tire is, say, 36x4", does that mean that the wheel is 36 inches and the outer diameter of the tire is 36 + 8 = 44 inches, or is the outer diameter of the tire 36 inches and the wheel is 36 - 8 = 28 inches? It seems that the wheel is 28 inches because a 44 inch wheel sounds absurd. BUT on my 1926 Packard with 7.00 x 21 tires, I know the wheel is alot bigger than 21 - 14 = 7 inches !! So on a car from the 1920's, the outer diameter of the tire is 21 plus 14 = 35. But on an earliere car, the outer diameter is 36 minus 8 = 28 inches. Why is it mea
  8. Hi --- Could anyone shed some light on the soundness of early engines that used ball bearings for their crankshafts? The Chalmers of around 1910-1912 or so used two ball bearings for their four cylinder engines. To me, ball bearings might be OK for light loads and VERY clean oil, but two main bearings in a big four is pretty scary. Any thoughts? Chalmers was a rather popular car with a decent reputation, that I can determine. --Scott
  9. Hi --- Perhaps this is the wrong forum, but could anyone shed some light on the soundness of early engines that used ball bearings for their crankshafts? The Chalmers of around 1910-1912 or so used two ball bearings for their four cylinder engines. To me, ball bearings might be OK for light loads and VERY clean oil, but two main bearings in a big four is pretty scary. Any thoughts? Chalmers was a rather popular car with a decent reputation, that I can determine. --Scott
  10. Hi all --- I read that when the K Lincolns came out in 1931 they used Gemmer worm and roller steering. As far as I am concerned, "Gemmer" is a profane word because it implies a poorly designed steering mechanism that quickly wore out and can't be adjusted. Franklin and Pierce Arrow used Gemmer with similar results and today can have many inches of free play in the steering wheel. Both Franklin and Pierce cars now have someone offering much needed rebuilding kits. Did Lincoln of this same 1931, 32, etc period use the same Gemmer steering that wears out quickly? Do most Lincolns of this perio
  11. Hi all --- Has anyone installed an overdrive onto a Model L or V8 KA Lincoln? I'm thinking about a 1932 but wondering about earlier cars as well. Curious to know if this can be done and who did it for you, or which overdrive unit you used? Are you happy with the result? Any suggestions? I know that high speed gears are available but in my hilly country an overdrive is preferred to preserve the lower ratio gears when necessary. Thanks -- Scott
×
×
  • Create New...