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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. The market for old cars has been dominated by dealers for some time now. A lot of people are trying to make a fast buck selling cars that had been escalating in price rapidly. Just like the Real Estate market. Consequently, many dealers are now tying to convince people that old cars are a "great investment" and are the only good place to put your money. Of course, cars have been good investments for them if they were selling a car for twice what they paid for it. But if you buy one of their cars today at twice current market values or more, you could loose alot of money if you can't keep i
  2. Hello --- You hear alot about the Cadillac V-16 engine but don't see much about the V-12. Could someone give me an opinion on the V-12 chassis cars? How good is the engine? Is it reliable? Does it have enough power to pull around a 5300 pound Sedan body? Are parts available? I appreciate your thoughts, in public or as a private e-mail. Thanks -- Scott
  3. Has anyone firsthand experience buying an American-made Classic car in Europe and importing it back to the USA? Can someone recommend a Customs Broker, shipping company, or other business who can handle the process? The car would be coming from northern Italy and going to the northeast USA, like Boston, NY or Baltimore. Any recommendations on a good entry port for the US? I've heard to avoid New York. Thanks ---Scott
  4. Hello -- Could someone please comment on the general opinion of the post-KB Lincoln Model K of the mid-to-late 1930's? I have the opportunity to buy one and would like to know if the smaller engine of the K is reliable, is a good engine, etc. For such heavy cars, is the K engine adequate? How are these cars in general regarded in the Classic Car world? Are they good tour cars? Thanks --- Scott
  5. Hello -- Could someone please comment on the general opinion of the post-KB Lincoln Model K of the mid-to-late 1930's? I have the opportunity to buy one and would like to know if the smaller engine of the K is reliable, is a good engine, etc. For such heavy cars, is the K engine adequate? How are these cars in general regarded in the Classic Car world? Thanks --- Scott
  6. Hello --- As the subject suggests, I would like to consider buying a car that is overseas in the Australia/New Zealand part of the world. It's an American pre-War car. I've never thought about what's involved with customs and shipping but my first thought is that it is hopelessly complicated. But then I realize that hordes of old cars have left our shores for Europe in recent years, so it can't be a show stopper. Anyone have experience buying a car overseas and bringing it home? Seems that I'd rather hire one company to do everything -- customs, ocean shipping, transport, etc. --- basical
  7. Hi all, Has anyone had any experience with buying a car overseas and bring it home to the USA? (I know ALOT of cars have left our shores for Europe, but has anyone actually brought one in??) I am considering a complete, operational car and parts from the Australia/New Zealand area and somehow getting it to New England. I've no experience going this. Should one hire a broker or importer to handle the whole thing? Any recommendations? Any idea what it would cost? Thanks for any advice. --Scott
  8. Hi all, Does anyone have any recent experience with having parts chrome plated? I have a 1931 Pierce Arrow which needs the radiator shell and both bumpers replated. There is surface rust on everything but no holes or deep pits. It's been a long time since I did anything like this, so I'm wondering what kind of money to expect to spend? Northeastern US probably since I'd rather take the parts there myself. Other suggestions welcome. --Thanks, Scott
  9. Hi all, I would like to buy a 1937 LaSalle in good running condition. Something fully restored or a very nice original would be my preferences. I do see these come up now and then but thought I'd toss this out. Any leads appreciated. Thanks --Scott
  10. Thanks for all of the advice. I agree that the seller clearly doesn't know his car or what he is talking about. It's been a real struggle to get information from him and frankly I'm worn out. He quoted the engine number for me but it began with a "1" and not a "4" as a Century engine should. However, the length of the valve cover was given as 33-1/2 inches. (The Special is 31 inches), so I'm reasonably sure it's a Century engine. The dash ID tag fairly clearly says that it's a Model 67. But the wheelbase was quoted as 122 inches. Even when I questioned this and said that it was a majo
  11. Thanks to all for their help. The car in question is indeed a Century. Or I should say, does indeed have a Century engine. I'm still bothered by the 122 inch wheelbase. Is it at all possible that a 320 engine could be put into a Special chassis? It's great that it's got the 320 engine, but it would be a shame if it had the 4.40 rear end. I mean, that's really what the Century was all about, wasn't it? It is possible that the owner measured the wheelbase incorrectly, but 4 inches is hard to misplace. Thanks again --- Scott
  12. Hello -- Could someone please help me identify this Auburn? Is this an 8-88 model? And what year is this? (I've attached photos --- hope this works!) Also, is the dashboard correct? It looks awfully sparse! I see someone added controls under, but originally where would the key go, or the choke be, etc. ?? Thanks -- Scott
  13. I'm trying very hard to identify a 1937 Buick series. Thanks to all of the comments and advice thus far. Could someone please measure the length of your valve cover, end to end, and let me know what you find? I have the length of the valve cover of the car in question: 33-1/2 inches. Now, is that the Special engine or the Century engine? If you could just take a minute and measure your engine, I would really appreciate knowing what you find. Then, my mystery should be solved. Thanks very much --- Scott
  14. Hi all, I've been researching the Century for 1937 and have an idea that I wonder if someone really sharp could support or refute. The Century is generally thought to use the 126-inch wheelbase while the Special used the 122-inch wheelbase. Might it be possible that the Slantback Sedans for 1937 (at least) used the 122 inch wheelbase whereas the Humpback Sedans used the slightly longer 126-inch wheelbase? What do you think? Anyone have a 1937 Slantback Century (a confirmed Century) who could measure their wheelbase??? Thanks very much --- Scott
  15. Grandpa wrote: "The 1937 Buick Special has the 248 cubic inch engine. The 1937 Buick Century has the 320 cubic inch engine. . . . The 320 engine is <span style="text-decoration: underline">about 3 inches longer</span> than the 248 engine. Could someone measure their engines and post for us the length of a Special engine and the length of a Century engine? Maybe a good reference might be the overall length of the valve cover. Thanks for your help --- Scott
  16. I know this topic has recently been discussed (sorry) , but I'd like to ask if the Century engine has dual carburetors? I thought it did but I have other sources that say it did not. So I'm confused. Is there a list available of serial numbers or engine numbers that can be used to identify a particular year and model? (And I guess I should ask, is that list where I can have access to it, as I'm sure it exists somewhere.) Thanks --- Scott
  17. I think this is very interesting, too. It seems that old cars have become like real estate --- sold primarily through a dealer. Except real estate dealers get a 6% markup. Old car dealers typically shoot for 100% or more. Take a look in Hemmings and count the number of ads from dealers or auction houses versus the number of ads from private sellers (if you can). There must be ten times the number of dealers today than a generation ago. It is destroying the hobby for ordinary guys who just want to enjoy owning and driving an old car. People in this for investments only are responsible, an
  18. Hi all, I was looking at some photographs of a 1913 (?) Maxwell touring car. Odd thing is that it has only one pedal --- only the clutch pedal? (And a gas pedal to the far right). Not a separate clutch and brake like every other car. What's going on?? :-) --Scott
  19. Hi all, Has anyone put an overdrive onto a 4-cylinder Dodge car? Mitchell makes an overdrive that goes into the torque tube of a Model A Ford. . . . I wonder if anyone has experimented with that sort of thing on a Dodge. Thanks -- Scott
  20. 1926 Packard Eight 5-passenger Phaeton for sale. Terrific car, tour proven, good looking. Needs nothing. See full description and photos on eBay through 5/19. Or look after the 19th see eBay completed auctions, auction number 180242259037 I'd attach a photo here, but I see no way to do that !! Oh well -- take a look on eBay. Some good photos.
  21. For Sale --- cylinder head and manifolds from a standard Eight. Go to eBay auctions 180243096435 and 180243100155
  22. Hi all, Anyone know what's involved with buying a pre-War old car, made in the USA like Ford, Buick, Chevrolet, and bringing it home to the USA? What happens when you try to cross the border into the US? What happens when you try to register the car at your local, friendly (ah- HEM) DMV office? Thanks -- Scott
  23. Hi all, Anyone know what's involved with buying a pre-War old car, made in the USA like Ford, Buick, Chevrolet, and bringing it home to the USA? What happens when you try to cross the border into the US? What happens when you try to register the car at your local, friendly (ah- HEM) DMV office? Thanks -- Scott
  24. Thanks --- I saw that one. I'm looking for something pretty much ready to drive, at least cosmetically. Authentically restored, etc. --Scott
  25. How about a 1912 EMF Touring. All original, complete, unrestored, everything there. You could probably drive it as it is with some clean up. It's in an old weathered New England barn filled with farm implements, bales of hay, horse harnesses, poultry cages. This thing is exactly what guys found looking for cars in the 1930's and 1940's. The whole place is a time machine for a long forgotten era. I hope the owner never sells it, and never moves it. Just knowing that there is still a genuine old barn with a real antique car still in it that no one has ever touched and few people know about
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