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Signs of life from my 1940 Studebaker (and some questions)


MarkV
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1940 Studebaker Champion Update: This evening I had some time to return to the Studebaker and do some work. My dash lights work! Yay! Ignition switch also works and I verified I am getting power to the coil (it started to get hot) I also used a test light which went off on the ignition side but NOT on the side with the wire to the distributor cap and the small wire to the distributor. I moved the small wire that goes to the distributor and it sparked for whatever it’s worth. I replaced the condenser and points but no start still. It has been sitting for many decades. 

Some questions:
1. The wire from the coil to the distributor attaches to the distributor and not the condenser nut? 
2. What is the order of the spark plug wires on the cap? Just wanting to be sure I have it right! 
3. I’m thinking I have a bad coil, it’s dented and looks original, also it became very hot to the touch and looks weathered.

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1) Not familiar with your Studebaker but typically the wire from the coil attaches to an insulated screw on the outside of the distributor with the points connected on the inside.

 

2) 1 5 3 6 2 4. It should be marked on the cylinder head.

 

3) Coils get warm in use. If you stuck a 12v battery in it, it will get quite hot. You can test it by sticking a spark plug wire in the coil, set the plug on the head, and flick the points open with a non metallic tool like a popsicle stick or plastic pen. If you get a good spark the coil is working. You can get a new coil for around $25 .

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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👏👏👏

 

That dash is impressive. Call me strange, but I like to see dashboards illuminated for night driving.

 

Sometimes, before we got those infernal touch screens at work, I'd dim the control room lights at night just to see that magnificent analog control board lit. Keeping outside equipment indicator lights working was another of my habits and earned me "the Bulbinator" nickname. Seeing all those indicators working was comforting.

 

 

 

 

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Heres video that will give you some answers to your questions and more...

 

 

I usually recommend having a copy of Motors Manual (From Ebay or a used book dealer) for appropriate year of the car under consideration. The books are written with the DIY mechanic in mind.

Good luck. 

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3 hours ago, Fossil said:

Your photos sure bring back memories from a time long gone. I like them. 

Hope you get your motor running without too much trouble. 

 

 

Well she is turning freely I’m going to replace the coil and see what happens 

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10 hours ago, rocketraider said:

👏👏👏

 

That dash is impressive. Call me strange, but I like to see dashboards illuminated for night driving.

 

Sometimes, before we got those infernal touch screens at work, I'd dim the control room lights at night just to see that magnificent analog control board lit. Keeping outside equipment indicator lights working was another of my habits and earned me "the Bulbinator" nickname. Seeing all those indicators working was comforting.

 

 

 

 

 

 Control room?  Sounds interesting. I recall a couple fondly.

 

  Ben

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