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A rare 1947 Labatt Brewing Co. Streamliner


George Smolinski
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Brands today should take their marketing cues from older businesses such as the Labatt Brewing Company. The Canadian company came up with the Labatt “Streamliner” since they couldn't advertise their delicious beer on a poster or in a magazine. Despite the Prohibition in Ontario ending in 1927, beer advertisements were still prohibited in the media. Good thing the brewing company had a team of marketing geniuses so they decided to spend their budget on that. Labatt tapped engineering and art expert Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky to help design the streamliner. 822164541_labatts.jpg.33308e3a2150eea663011b36ade7c6bf.jpg

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Two Scott brothers from London, Ontario took on that massive restoration project, one of whom is still living. A trailer was found being used as an office in a gravel pit. All the oak ribbing had to be replaced and large sheets of aluminum had to be sourced from England.

No original cab was ever found, so this one was recreated from scratch, using original photos for scale and reference. A standard White cabover chassis was used. 

They did an incredible job. 

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26 minutes ago, George Smolinski said:

Brands today should take their marketing cues from older businesses such as the Labatt Brewing Company. The Canadian company came up with the Labatt “Streamliner” since they couldn't advertise their delicious beer on a poster or in a magazine. Despite the Prohibition in Ontario ending in 1927, beer advertisements were still prohibited in the media. Good thing the brewing company had a team of marketing geniuses so they decided to spend their budget on that. Labatt tapped engineering and art expert Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky to help design the streamliner. 822164541_labatts.jpg.33308e3a2150eea663011b36ade7c6bf.jpg

 

An amazing Restoration/Re-creation

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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

Brands today should take their marketing cues from older businesses such as the Labatt Brewing Company. The Canadian company came up with the Labatt “Streamliner” since they couldn't advertise their delicious beer on a poster or in a magazine. Despite the Prohibition in Ontario ending in 1927, beer advertisements were still prohibited in the media. Good thing the brewing company had a team of marketing geniuses so they decided to spend their budget on that. Labatt tapped engineering and art expert Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky to help design the streamliner. 822164541_labatts.jpg.33308e3a2150eea663011b36ade7c6bf.jpg

As far as I know Prohibition was only in force across all of Canada during 1918 - 1920, largely as a move to conserve grain for the war effort. Ontario lagged behind nearly all of the other Canadian province except Prince Edward Island  in maintaining prohibition until the 1927 date mentioned. Most Provinces ended the ruling around the 1920 year or shortly after once the Federal Law was abolished.

 

Greg

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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

Brands today should take their marketing cues from older businesses such as the Labatt Brewing Company. The Canadian company came up with the Labatt “Streamliner” since they couldn't advertise their delicious beer on a poster or in a magazine. Despite the Prohibition in Ontario ending in 1927, beer advertisements were still prohibited in the media. Good thing the brewing company had a team of marketing geniuses so they decided to spend their budget on that. Labatt tapped engineering and art expert Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky to help design the streamliner. 822164541_labatts.jpg.33308e3a2150eea663011b36ade7c6bf.jpg

 

I grew up in the era of these trucks below but remember my grandparents talking about the drivers besides required to wear a uniform were also expected to stop on the highway to assist stranded motorists - all in the name of good corporate relations with their customers.  As a side note I used to work in London, Ont, the home of Labatt's - the area that I normally worked was where the brewery is still located and used to also include Canada Bread, Kellogg's, McCormick Biscuits and Club House spices - windows were always open in that neighbourhood to take in all the aromas!   

Labatt's Transtar 4300 & trailer | Timber Industry Modelers

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Another Labatt truck restored by Joe and Vic Scott. Joe was the proprietor of London White Trucks. I remember seeing this 1919 White sitting in the back compound awaiting restoration.

Jim Pictures from work computer 148 (2).jpg

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4 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

Two Scott brothers from London, Ontario took on that massive restoration project, one of whom is still living. A trailer was found being used as an office in a gravel pit. All the oak ribbing had to be replaced and large sheets of aluminum had to be sourced from England.

No original cab was ever found, so this one was recreated from scratch, using original photos for scale and reference. A standard White cabover chassis was used. 

They did an incredible job. 

I recall that trailer, painted black, sitting forlornly in the gravel pit! At the time I was fascinated by its unusual shape.  It reminded me of the aerodynamics of the Chrysler Airflow I had at the time.  I didn't realize what it actually was until the Scott brothers rescued and restored it. Up close, the Streamliner is just beautiful. 

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