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Without doubt, this 1932 Packard 904 Sedan is the ideal preservation class candidate for the 2020 concours season. An original time capsule with unsurpassed originality, this car has not been touched or massaged and has never been publicly displayed. Coupled with its extraordinary provenance including single-family ownership from new until 2009, now is the time to acquire this car for application to 2020 events including Pebble Beach. Unseen, untouched, unparalleled.  History from new and ready for use.  

 

Please share with your car friends. 

 

Located with me in Smithfield, RI and the price is $75,000

 

Many pictures available.  Full details at the link.

 https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1932-packard-904-sedan/

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1932 Packard 904 Sedan-2.jpg

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As a guy who has ALWAYS loved the big High Classic Era sedans, the obvious luxury of this Packard checks all the boxes. This displays the best of a well-earned, and well-preserved patina. The definitive example of what otherwise is an over-used word, often a misplaced excuse for damage, some quite severe. THIS is patina. Too bad we can not communicate aroma !!! Another great one from you, Tom.   -    Carl 

 

P.S.  If you don't mind a suggestion : I have noticed that your automotive photography portrays a false and unattractive stance to your subjects. This is because they are taken through a slightly telephoto lens. That magnifies the more distant end of the cars, making the cars appear ungainly. The farther wheel/tire must be SMALLER than the closer one. Better a VERY SLIGHT wide angle lens, if not normal focal length, than any degree of telephoto whatsoever.     Please don't shoot the messenger, I greatly admire you and your cars.  Please do them photographic justice.     Best of luck with all your sales.     -   CC 

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As I posted elsewhere, the 1932 904 Packard is my favorite platform of all the Packards I have driven, from 1910 to the 50’s, I have played with most of them. The 904 chassis is fantastic. Just the right amount of power without the extra mass of the 12. Absolutely the best styling that Packard ever offered..........no skirted fenders. These cars are fast, reliable, and just look great. It would be my choice for the “only one you can own” Packard platform. Add in the fantastic provenance and great condition, and a very reasonable price.......what more could one ask for? 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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47 minutes ago, edinmass said:

As I posted elsewhere, the 1932 904 Packard is my favorite platform of all the Packards I have driven, from 1910 to the 50’s, I have played with most of them. The 904 chassis is fantastic. Just the right amount of power without the extra mass of the 12. Absolutely the best styling that Packard ever offered..........no skirted fenders. These cars are fast, reliable, and just look great. It would be my choice for the “only one you can own” Packard platform. Add in the fantastic provenance and great condition, and a very reasonable price.......what more could one ask for? 

1932 was a really great year for car "looks"(such as lower sills) + car sales were another thing though in "grim" = sort of makes for the perfect combo for collectibility. 

 

As a sidnote - in 1932, you get some revivals of certain things like car manufactures that used pressed steel window sills now again offered wood - was it they could not afford the tooling or a revival of something they know people would be most pleased with ? Perhaps, there were more wood laborers available in marketplace for peanuts.  Or, ...

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I think the factory’s were so slow, using real wood kept the workforce in place.........they didn’t know how much longer the depression was going to keep rolling on..........and according to my family, labor pay rates per hour we’re dropping so the dollar cost of using more laborers would have been more cost effective.......

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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15 hours ago, C Carl said:

P.S.  If you don't mind a suggestion : I have noticed that your automotive photography portrays a false and unattractive stance to your subjects. This is because they are taken through a slightly telephoto lens. That magnifies the more distant end of the cars, making the cars appear ungainly. The farther wheel/tire must be SMALLER than the closer one. Better a VERY SLIGHT wide angle lens, if not normal focal length, than any degree of telephoto whatsoever.     Please don't shoot the messenger, I greatly admire you and your cars.  Please do them photographic justice.     Best of luck with all your sales.     -   CC 

Carl, thank you for the feedback and suggestion.  I do shoot through a slightly telephoto lens and on occasion, I see a distortion of sorts.  My wide angle is just too  wide, so I may have to invest in another lens.  I am certainly an amateur photographer (always on the automatic setting) and always welcome feedback from anyone with more experience than me.  I will play around with some new lenses, but I do seem to gravitate to this look.  

1934 Packard 1105 7 Passenger Touring Sedan-303.jpg

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A 904 Sedan-Limousine in unrestored condition sold at an auction at Darien Center, New York in the early 1990's.   At the time, I assumed it would be restored as a sport phaeton, anyone have knowledge of that particular car?

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