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Tom Laferriere

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About Tom Laferriere

  • Birthday 01/17/1967

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  1. 1925 Nash Advanced Six Roadster Serial no. 317055 Engine no. 204401 Series 160. Body Style no. 166. 60 hp, 248.9 cu. in. OHV inline six-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, semi-elliptical leaf spring front suspension, semi-floating rear axle, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 121 in. Nash made a well-earned name for itself as a builder of reliable, solidly constructed mid-priced cars, but it is often forgotten that they also enjoyed peppy performance and distinctive, attractive styling. Such was the positive reception to the company’s 1925 models that sales rose a full 50 percent over the previous calendar year. This was on the basis of expensive-looking styling that, on the Advanced Six, included a hood with long narrow louvers, a nickeled radiator shell, and balloon tires. These features were shown to especially good effect on the Advanced Six Roadster, a jaunty two-passenger model which the manufacturer described as having a “long, sweeping rear deck, graced with nickeled guard bars, of the classically symmetrical Nash dreadnaught design.” The Advanced Six Roadster shown here is believed by the owner to be one of fewer than five remaining in roadworthy condition. Was sold in 1967 by William J. Smith of Crown Point, Indiana, to Lyle Carl Marshall of Dana, Iowa, who owned the car at least through 1972. In 2002 it was owned by Richard and Judith Schulze of Mountain Home, Arkansas, next passing to an owner in Texas and then to the current caretaker, a longtime connoisseur of the marque. The body is believed to have been refinished in the Schulzes’ ownership, in colors very similar to the original hues; the top was replaced several years ago, the carburetor rebuilt in 2017, and the top end of the engine rebuilt in 2018. Overall the car presents in very attractive and usable condition, with an engine compartment and undercarriage that have been cleaned up but never truly restored, and therefore bear a charming patina. Its starts easily, runs, drives, stops quite well and surprising has a huge amount of leg room, usually unheard of in cars of this era. A wonderful example of a rare roadster. Accompanying the car is a small collection of ownership documentation and receipts, as well as selected original Advanced Six sales literature, including a promotional pamphlet, full brochure, a Information for the Owner manual for an Advanced Six, and a tremendously impressive bound hardcover salesman’s manual, as well as a copy of Motor Age in which an advertisement for the model appears. Correct bumpers and side windscreens are also included. This is a lovely, unusual automobile which is rarely seen on the market – a wonderful, seldom-seen survivor of the great Wisconsin automaker, Nash. Many pictures available at the link. Asking $24,500 and located with me in Smithfield, RI. Worldwide Shipping happily arranged.
  2. The 1956 Packard 400 offered here has been in the same ownership from 1975-2017 (history prior to 1975 is unknown) when I sold it to the current owner. He has improved the car with the rear axle service, full brake service, new radiator and 4 new whitewall radial tires. A detailed list of the work done can be provided upon request. This Packard remains mostly original, other than a paint job (and carpet) sometime in the late 60’s to its original blue. It runs well, the transmission and push button selector work well. Radio, power antenna work well, lights, directionals. Both heaters and fans working, but the heater core hot water is disconnected, Not working are the fuel gauge, wipers and interior lights. The pictures should clearly show the cosmetics of the car, both inside and out. Offered at $16,500 and is in my showroom located in Smithfield, RI. More pictures and info at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1956-packard-400-coupe/
  3. 1967 Plymouth Satellite Hardtop Coupe 325 hp, 383 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed Torqueflite automatic transmission, independent front and rear semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116 in. It is incredibly rare to find a MoPar muscle car of the remarkable quality of that offered here, which truly checks all of the boxes in terms of provenance, preservation, and absolutely bulletproof documentation. Then again, that should all be no surprise in the case of this car, which spent almost all of its life in the tender loving care of the young man who bought it new, and who faithfully preserved it as a treasured possession for the rest of his life. Among the peerless paperwork is a copy of the Chrysler Production Record, confirming the car to have been built in Los Angeles and sold to Coast Chrysler-Plymouth of Manhattan Beach, California, on October 10, 1966. Typical of MoPars, the actual build date is reflected on the data plate as October 12th , 1966. It was finished in Bright Red with Silver lower body paint over white/black vinyl bucket seats, and equipped with the 383 cu. in. V-8 with four-barrel carburetor and dual exhaust, 3.23 rear axle, Torqueflite transmission, Transaudio AM radio, power steering, tinted windshield, center console, and the Light Package with courtesy light, glove box light, trunk light, and fender mounted turn signal indicators. On February 1, 1967, the Satellite was bought by its fortunate original owner, 23-year-old Michael J. “Mike” Dion of Inglewood, California. This car remained in Mr. Dion’s possession in southern California until his death 43 years later. Hardly the type to beat on his new muscle car, Mr. Dion was a meticulous owner, the sort that cars must dream of – maintaining virtually every scrap of paperwork on every service and maintenance detail over the years. He kept the original window sticker, reflecting all the above options as well as pinstriping, a remote mirror (noted on the data tag), and whitewall tires, and a final cost of $3,486.25. He also kept the original Chrysler Certicard stamped with his name and address, the owner’s manual, a warranty booklet, a pink slip dated 1974, and, beginning in 1973, remarkably detailed records of maintenance and upkeep. Every year between 1973 and 2008 is represented in a binder, with a list of the work performed that year, backed up by invoices for each work order! The evolving odometer reading and the amount of gasoline bought per year were also scrupulously recorded. Handwritten notes record the manufacturer and specification of virtually every part used on the car, down to the belts, oil filter, and spark plugs. It is clear that the car was never mistreated or modified in any way, and equally clear in this trove of documentation is that Mr. Dion adored his automobile and doted upon it like a favorite child. Mr. Dion passed away in 2010 and his Plymouth was sold the following year, shortly afterward finding its way into the care of its current, second private owner since new. He has continued to care for the car in the manner to which it is accustomed, installing a new water pump, universal joints, master cylinder, front wheel cylinders, and hoses, and a remanufactured power steering pump. Only the AM radio is currently not working. The seats were reupholstered before the current owner’s acquisition, while the paint was resprayed and the engine rebuilt in Mr. Dion’s ownership, some years ago. Other than these very sympathetic improvements, the Satellite remains a well-preserved, largely original example. As this car has never been subjected to wintry weather, it is completely rust free. The car is accompanied by the aforementioned, remarkable collection of documentation, as well as by two extra sets of wheels and tires, and a collection of spare parts. Noted by Galen Govier as one of six known extant Los Angeles-built 1967 Satellite hardtops with the four-barrel 383 V-8, this is a truly rare automobile, not only for its specification and as the definition of a “dry California car,” but for its absolutely superb presentation and beyond-reproach documentation and provenance. Its combination of outstanding attributes would be impossible to duplicate at any price, and its new owner is sure to feel the same rich pride of ownership that Mike Dion savored for 43 years and that its current owner has enjoyed for almost 10 years. $29,500 and it is located with me in Smithfield, RI. More photos at link: https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1967-plymouth-satellite/
  4. You guys are awesome and pretty sharp. I just listed this car yesterday on Facebook, I have not had a chance to write the full description or get it on my website. But my phone has been blowing up all day because of it! 😁
  5. 1941 Packard 160 DE Convertible Coupe Vehicle No. DE-1479-2015Engine No. D500663 Series 1903. 160 hp, 356 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in. For 1941’s Nineteenth Series models, Packard extensively modernized the car’s styling, lengthening all bodies by five inches, moving radiators further forward, and blending the headlamps and parking lights smoothly into the fenders. Outside of the limited-production “Darrins,” the most costly convertibles were found in the Super Eight One Sixty line, including a sleek convertible coupe with an excellent power-to-weight ratio thanks to its nine-main-bearing, 356-cubic-inch engine. Importantly this example retains the original firewall vehicle number tag, identifying it as a genuine One Sixty Convertible Coupe DE, delivered by the Packard Motor Car Company of New York on April 26, 1941. Further, it is desirably outfitted with the Deluxe interior, which features genuine wood garnish moldings for a touch of old-fashioned elegance, as well as sidemounted spare tires. The current owner acquired this fine Saratoga Beige Packard on the West Coast nearly two decades ago, as the latest in a line of high-quality Classic Packards to have passed through his hands. At the time the car was in solid, very original condition, reportedly including even the factory interior and top, in good driver-quality order. Subsequently the engine was fully rebuilt by Buxbaum Brothers, and a new top and interior were fitted. Afterward the car was driven extensively, including participation in a CCCA CARavan in Montana and other events over the years. As a testament to its excellent care and maintenance, it was most recently driven from its home in New Jersey to Tom Laferriere's place in Rhode Island (over 200 miles on Interstate 95), and has since undergone further professional sorting at the hands of marque specialists Parker’s Packards, including proper adjustment of all valves, repair and surfacing of the manifolds, tuning the carburetor and ignition, and rebuilding the speedometer, ammeter, and temperature gauges. Today running and driving sweetly on its radial tires and in very good overall condition, this handsome Packard is sure to thrill a new owner on further CARavan adventures or simply ice cream trips. Located with me in Smithfield, RI and asking $79,500. More pictures and information at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1941-packard-160-convertible-coupe/
  6. Full photoshoot at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1915-oakland-model-37-speedster/
  7. After 7 years of enjoyment, I have decided to sell my Oakland Speedster. Chassis no. 383999 Engine no. X75381 40 hp, 192.4 cu. in. Northway L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, semi-elliptical front and 3/4-elliptical rear leaf spring suspension, and rear-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in. Oakland is well-remembered as one of the founding marques of General Motors and as the parent of the “junior” Pontiac. Its Brass Era models were noted for their attractive styling, relative lightness, and good performance, especially evident in the Model 37 of 1915 – a fine basis for speedster bodywork, with a rakish vee’d radiator that added a bit of extra dash. According to Oakland historian Wayne Koffel, this particular Model 37 was an export model, shipped as a knocked-down kit of parts to either Australia or New Zealand, where it was assembled for that market. Its status as an export model explains the anachronistic features such as right-hand-drive, which had by 1915 been obsolete on home-market Oaklands for two years. The car’s history is known back to the mid-1960s, when it was acquired at a Vintage Car Club of New Zealand rally in Hawkes Bay by Bob Mansbridge. After several years of planning but not accomplishing the restoration, he sold the car to fellow enthusiasts Roger and Diane White, who took on Mansbridge’s dream of rebuilding the Oakland in the mold of a Mercer Raceabout. The original tourer body was changed out for this dramatic speedster coachwork, with a body, tank, and mudguards that the talented Mr. White crafted himself; he also cast his own monocle windshield, mounted on a lowered cowl with a mahogany dashboard. He learned panelbeating at a local technical school in order to make the seats from scratch, while the rear of the body was formed by a boatbuilder friend. The steering column was shifted back by rotating the spring hanger, the gearshift was relocated outside the car for the proper look, and the rear springs were moved atop the frame, to lower it and produce a more rakish appearance. Several period photos accompany the car, showing it both as-found and in use following its completion. Upon its completion, “Oaky” was driven by the Whites in the 1972 International Rally and in many other events in their home country over the next several years, recognized by the various badges found on the car today. It was eventually sold in the late 1980s in favor of a more practical classic for their growing family, and wound up being sold in Auckland to an American serving in the Antarctic; the Whites recalled hearing that the new owner flew it home to the States aboard a C-130 Hercules. Eventually the car was inherited by a gentleman in Long Island, who sold it to the current owner several years ago. The owner reports that the car runs and drives well, and strongly, and that it has been wonderfully fun to own and enjoy. Durable and well-engineered in the best Oakland tradition, it boasts the highly compliment to be given a Brass Era speedster: it is as well-proportioned and attractive as the Mercer that its body apes. Located with me in Smithfield, RI and I am asking $34,500
  8. I have decided to sell this great Speedster after 7 years of ownership and enjoyment. I am asking $34,500 and its located in Smithfield, RI Chassis no. 383999 Engine no. X75381 40 hp, 192.4 cu. in. Northway L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, semi-elliptical front and 3/4-elliptical rear leaf spring suspension, and rear-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in. Oakland is well-remembered as one of the founding marques of General Motors and as the parent of the “junior” Pontiac. Its Brass Era models were noted for their attractive styling, relative lightness, and good performance, especially evident in the Model 37 of 1915 – a fine basis for speedster bodywork, with a rakish vee’d radiator that added a bit of extra dash. According to Oakland historian Wayne Koffel, this particular Model 37 was an export model, shipped as a knocked-down kit of parts to either Australia or New Zealand, where it was assembled for that market. Its status as an export model explains the anachronistic features such as right-hand-drive, which had by 1915 been obsolete on home-market Oaklands for two years. The car’s history is known back to the mid-1960s, when it was acquired at a Vintage Car Club of New Zealand rally in Hawkes Bay by Bob Mansbridge. After several years of planning but not accomplishing the restoration, he sold the car to fellow enthusiasts Roger and Diane White, who took on Mansbridge’s dream of rebuilding the Oakland in the mold of a Mercer Raceabout. The original tourer body was changed out for this dramatic speedster coachwork, with a body, tank, and mudguards that the talented Mr. White crafted himself; he also cast his own monocle windshield, mounted on a lowered cowl with a mahogany dashboard. He learned panelbeating at a local technical school in order to make the seats from scratch, while the rear of the body was formed by a boatbuilder friend. The steering column was shifted back by rotating the spring hanger, the gearshift was relocated outside the car for the proper look, and the rear springs were moved atop the frame, to lower it and produce a more rakish appearance. Several period photos accompany the car, showing it both as-found and in use following its completion. Upon its completion, “Oaky” was driven by the Whites in the 1972 International Rally and in many other events in their home country over the next several years, recognized by the various badges found on the car today. It was eventually sold in the late 1980s in favor of a more practical classic for their growing family, and wound up being sold in Auckland to an American serving in the Antarctic; the Whites recalled hearing that the new owner flew it home to the States aboard a C-130 Hercules. Eventually the car was inherited by a gentleman in Long Island, who sold it to the current owner several years ago. The owner reports that the car runs and drives well, and strongly, and that it has been wonderfully fun to own and enjoy. Durable and well-engineered in the best Oakland tradition, it boasts the highly compliment to be given a Brass Era speedster: it is as well-proportioned and attractive as the Mercer that its body apes.
  9. All the pictures are located at the link. A reasonable offer will most likely get this Dearborn Awarded 1942 Ford Deluxe Station Wagon. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1942-ford-super-deluxe-station-wagon/
  10. 1956 Packard Caribbean Chassis no. 5699-1107 Motor no. 5699-1107 Series 5688. 310 hp, 374 cu. in. overhead valve V-8 engine, twin four-barrel carburetors, Ultramatic automatic transmission, front and rear torsion bar self-leveling suspension, and power-assisted four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in. Many consider the 1956 Caribbean to be the last true great Packard – a limited-production automobile, beautifully fashioned to the highest levels of engineering excellence and sumptuous luxury. Packard had refined the previous year’s design, improving the transmission for greater reliability, and fitting a special “reversible” interior, with loose cushions faced on one side in cloth and the other in leather, as well as a metallic grille insert. Caribbeans also came standard with almost every available factory accessory, including dual four-barrel carburetors. The Caribbean offered here is accompanied by copies of its Studebaker-Packard build information, noting it to have been originally finished in this sparkling color scheme of Dover White, Danube Blue, and Roman Copper, a trio that proved quite a popular selection for many of the 276 1956 Caribbean convertibles built. Other features included Solex glass and the optional Twin Traction Safety Differential, which was optioned on this car. Interestingly the records on file note that the car was delivered directly to a customer at the Packard factory’s Service Garage, on February 9, 1956; however,1955-56 Caribbean Roster Keeper Stuart Blond’s records indicated it as assigned as a Public Relations car to Ellis Craig of the Universal Advertising Agency in Hollywood, California, and so may have led a rather interesting early life in Tinseltown! The Caribbean made its way to California collector Bill Huffman (sometimes spelled Hoffman), who accumulated Packards for thirty years. He ultimately amassed a large collection that including around eighteen Caribbeans in the dry climate of the Mojave Desert east of Los Angeles. In the mid-1970s, Huffman sold his entire collection to another collector who hauled them to his tow yard in Santa Ana and began selling them off. In 1977 when circumstances pressured him to downsize, the remaining hundred or so cars were auctioned at a poorly-advertised sale, with any unsold cars immediately being fed to the crusher. Sadly it was too late before many club members learned of the auction; this infamous event became known as the Packard Crushathon. Fortunately, this Caribbean was saved from the crusher by Joe Clayton’s stepfather, Wesley Norris, of South Gate and some work performed on the car over a number of years, including gathering many parts required for the restoration. The current owner acquired the car around 2007 from an owner in Montana, and began a body-off restoration. An avid and knowledgeable Caribbean enthusiast and serial collector of Caribbeans and other postwar Packards he has also been a member of both Packards International Motor Car Club and Packard Automobile Classics for the last five decades. Much of the work, including a thorough mechanical restoration and paintwork, was completed by Mike Dotson of Montana, while a beautiful, correct interior was also fitted. The owner proudly notes that it retains its original engine, numbered to match the chassis, equipped with a correct factory dual four-barrel carburetor setup, and the restoration particularly with respect to accuracy and authenticity, benefitted from his years of experience with this model. Since completion of the restoration in 2009, the car has been driven several thousand road miles, which tested the mettle of this car and has resulted in an extremely reliable car. Many of these trips were taken to various national meets, and it was a class award-winner at the Packard Automobile Classics National Meet at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 2010. Accompanying the car is a meticulous list of work and restoration costs kept by the owner over the years, as well as many of the corresponding invoices. An unusually well-sorted example of the last great Packard, this Caribbean is offered from a loving, knowledgeable home, and is sure to be a favorite cruiser for the next owner’s collection. This wonderful Packard is located with me in Smithfield, RI and the asking price is $66,500. More pictures at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1956-packard-caribbean-2/
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