Tom Laferriere

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Everything posted by Tom Laferriere

  1. 1941 Packard 160 DE Convertible Coupe Vehicle No. DE-1479-2015Engine No. D500663 Series 1903. 160 hp, 356 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in. For 1941’s Nineteenth Series models, Packard extensively modernized the car’s styling, lengthening all bodies by five inches, moving radiators further forward, and blending the headlamps and parking lights smoothly into the fenders. Outside of the limited-production “Darrins,” the most costly convertibles were found in the Super Eight One Sixty line, including a sleek convertible coupe with an excellent power-to-weight ratio thanks to its nine-main-bearing, 356-cubic-inch engine. Importantly this example retains the original firewall vehicle number tag, identifying it as a genuine One Sixty Convertible Coupe DE, delivered by the Packard Motor Car Company of New York on April 26, 1941. Further, it is desirably outfitted with the Deluxe interior, which features genuine wood garnish moldings for a touch of old-fashioned elegance, as well as sidemounted spare tires. The current owner acquired this fine Saratoga Beige Packard on the West Coast nearly two decades ago, as the latest in a line of high-quality Classic Packards to have passed through his hands. At the time the car was in solid, very original condition, reportedly including even the factory interior and top, in good driver-quality order. Subsequently the engine was fully rebuilt by Buxbaum Brothers, and a new top and interior were fitted. Afterward the car was driven extensively, including participation in a CCCA CARavan in Montana and other events over the years. As a testament to its excellent care and maintenance, it was most recently driven from its home in New Jersey to Tom Laferriere's place in Rhode Island (over 200 miles on Interstate 95), and has since undergone further professional sorting at the hands of marque specialists Parker’s Packards, including proper adjustment of all valves, repair and surfacing of the manifolds, tuning the carburetor and ignition, and rebuilding the speedometer, ammeter, and temperature gauges. Today running and driving sweetly on its radial tires and in very good overall condition, this handsome Packard is sure to thrill a new owner on further CARavan adventures or simply ice cream trips. Located with me in Smithfield, RI and asking $79,500. More pictures and information at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1941-packard-160-convertible-coupe/
  2. Full photoshoot at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1915-oakland-model-37-speedster/
  3. After 7 years of enjoyment, I have decided to sell my Oakland Speedster. Chassis no. 383999 Engine no. X75381 40 hp, 192.4 cu. in. Northway L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, semi-elliptical front and 3/4-elliptical rear leaf spring suspension, and rear-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in. Oakland is well-remembered as one of the founding marques of General Motors and as the parent of the “junior” Pontiac. Its Brass Era models were noted for their attractive styling, relative lightness, and good performance, especially evident in the Model 37 of 1915 – a fine basis for speedster bodywork, with a rakish vee’d radiator that added a bit of extra dash. According to Oakland historian Wayne Koffel, this particular Model 37 was an export model, shipped as a knocked-down kit of parts to either Australia or New Zealand, where it was assembled for that market. Its status as an export model explains the anachronistic features such as right-hand-drive, which had by 1915 been obsolete on home-market Oaklands for two years. The car’s history is known back to the mid-1960s, when it was acquired at a Vintage Car Club of New Zealand rally in Hawkes Bay by Bob Mansbridge. After several years of planning but not accomplishing the restoration, he sold the car to fellow enthusiasts Roger and Diane White, who took on Mansbridge’s dream of rebuilding the Oakland in the mold of a Mercer Raceabout. The original tourer body was changed out for this dramatic speedster coachwork, with a body, tank, and mudguards that the talented Mr. White crafted himself; he also cast his own monocle windshield, mounted on a lowered cowl with a mahogany dashboard. He learned panelbeating at a local technical school in order to make the seats from scratch, while the rear of the body was formed by a boatbuilder friend. The steering column was shifted back by rotating the spring hanger, the gearshift was relocated outside the car for the proper look, and the rear springs were moved atop the frame, to lower it and produce a more rakish appearance. Several period photos accompany the car, showing it both as-found and in use following its completion. Upon its completion, “Oaky” was driven by the Whites in the 1972 International Rally and in many other events in their home country over the next several years, recognized by the various badges found on the car today. It was eventually sold in the late 1980s in favor of a more practical classic for their growing family, and wound up being sold in Auckland to an American serving in the Antarctic; the Whites recalled hearing that the new owner flew it home to the States aboard a C-130 Hercules. Eventually the car was inherited by a gentleman in Long Island, who sold it to the current owner several years ago. The owner reports that the car runs and drives well, and strongly, and that it has been wonderfully fun to own and enjoy. Durable and well-engineered in the best Oakland tradition, it boasts the highly compliment to be given a Brass Era speedster: it is as well-proportioned and attractive as the Mercer that its body apes. Located with me in Smithfield, RI and I am asking $34,500
  4. I have decided to sell this great Speedster after 7 years of ownership and enjoyment. I am asking $34,500 and its located in Smithfield, RI Chassis no. 383999 Engine no. X75381 40 hp, 192.4 cu. in. Northway L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, semi-elliptical front and 3/4-elliptical rear leaf spring suspension, and rear-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in. Oakland is well-remembered as one of the founding marques of General Motors and as the parent of the “junior” Pontiac. Its Brass Era models were noted for their attractive styling, relative lightness, and good performance, especially evident in the Model 37 of 1915 – a fine basis for speedster bodywork, with a rakish vee’d radiator that added a bit of extra dash. According to Oakland historian Wayne Koffel, this particular Model 37 was an export model, shipped as a knocked-down kit of parts to either Australia or New Zealand, where it was assembled for that market. Its status as an export model explains the anachronistic features such as right-hand-drive, which had by 1915 been obsolete on home-market Oaklands for two years. The car’s history is known back to the mid-1960s, when it was acquired at a Vintage Car Club of New Zealand rally in Hawkes Bay by Bob Mansbridge. After several years of planning but not accomplishing the restoration, he sold the car to fellow enthusiasts Roger and Diane White, who took on Mansbridge’s dream of rebuilding the Oakland in the mold of a Mercer Raceabout. The original tourer body was changed out for this dramatic speedster coachwork, with a body, tank, and mudguards that the talented Mr. White crafted himself; he also cast his own monocle windshield, mounted on a lowered cowl with a mahogany dashboard. He learned panelbeating at a local technical school in order to make the seats from scratch, while the rear of the body was formed by a boatbuilder friend. The steering column was shifted back by rotating the spring hanger, the gearshift was relocated outside the car for the proper look, and the rear springs were moved atop the frame, to lower it and produce a more rakish appearance. Several period photos accompany the car, showing it both as-found and in use following its completion. Upon its completion, “Oaky” was driven by the Whites in the 1972 International Rally and in many other events in their home country over the next several years, recognized by the various badges found on the car today. It was eventually sold in the late 1980s in favor of a more practical classic for their growing family, and wound up being sold in Auckland to an American serving in the Antarctic; the Whites recalled hearing that the new owner flew it home to the States aboard a C-130 Hercules. Eventually the car was inherited by a gentleman in Long Island, who sold it to the current owner several years ago. The owner reports that the car runs and drives well, and strongly, and that it has been wonderfully fun to own and enjoy. Durable and well-engineered in the best Oakland tradition, it boasts the highly compliment to be given a Brass Era speedster: it is as well-proportioned and attractive as the Mercer that its body apes.
  5. All the pictures are located at the link. A reasonable offer will most likely get this Dearborn Awarded 1942 Ford Deluxe Station Wagon. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1942-ford-super-deluxe-station-wagon/
  6. 1956 Packard Caribbean Chassis no. 5699-1107 Motor no. 5699-1107 Series 5688. 310 hp, 374 cu. in. overhead valve V-8 engine, twin four-barrel carburetors, Ultramatic automatic transmission, front and rear torsion bar self-leveling suspension, and power-assisted four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in. Many consider the 1956 Caribbean to be the last true great Packard – a limited-production automobile, beautifully fashioned to the highest levels of engineering excellence and sumptuous luxury. Packard had refined the previous year’s design, improving the transmission for greater reliability, and fitting a special “reversible” interior, with loose cushions faced on one side in cloth and the other in leather, as well as a metallic grille insert. Caribbeans also came standard with almost every available factory accessory, including dual four-barrel carburetors. The Caribbean offered here is accompanied by copies of its Studebaker-Packard build information, noting it to have been originally finished in this sparkling color scheme of Dover White, Danube Blue, and Roman Copper, a trio that proved quite a popular selection for many of the 276 1956 Caribbean convertibles built. Other features included Solex glass and the optional Twin Traction Safety Differential, which was optioned on this car. Interestingly the records on file note that the car was delivered directly to a customer at the Packard factory’s Service Garage, on February 9, 1956; however,1955-56 Caribbean Roster Keeper Stuart Blond’s records indicated it as assigned as a Public Relations car to Ellis Craig of the Universal Advertising Agency in Hollywood, California, and so may have led a rather interesting early life in Tinseltown! The Caribbean made its way to California collector Bill Huffman (sometimes spelled Hoffman), who accumulated Packards for thirty years. He ultimately amassed a large collection that including around eighteen Caribbeans in the dry climate of the Mojave Desert east of Los Angeles. In the mid-1970s, Huffman sold his entire collection to another collector who hauled them to his tow yard in Santa Ana and began selling them off. In 1977 when circumstances pressured him to downsize, the remaining hundred or so cars were auctioned at a poorly-advertised sale, with any unsold cars immediately being fed to the crusher. Sadly it was too late before many club members learned of the auction; this infamous event became known as the Packard Crushathon. Fortunately, this Caribbean was saved from the crusher by Joe Clayton’s stepfather, Wesley Norris, of South Gate and some work performed on the car over a number of years, including gathering many parts required for the restoration. The current owner acquired the car around 2007 from an owner in Montana, and began a body-off restoration. An avid and knowledgeable Caribbean enthusiast and serial collector of Caribbeans and other postwar Packards he has also been a member of both Packards International Motor Car Club and Packard Automobile Classics for the last five decades. Much of the work, including a thorough mechanical restoration and paintwork, was completed by Mike Dotson of Montana, while a beautiful, correct interior was also fitted. The owner proudly notes that it retains its original engine, numbered to match the chassis, equipped with a correct factory dual four-barrel carburetor setup, and the restoration particularly with respect to accuracy and authenticity, benefitted from his years of experience with this model. Since completion of the restoration in 2009, the car has been driven several thousand road miles, which tested the mettle of this car and has resulted in an extremely reliable car. Many of these trips were taken to various national meets, and it was a class award-winner at the Packard Automobile Classics National Meet at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 2010. Accompanying the car is a meticulous list of work and restoration costs kept by the owner over the years, as well as many of the corresponding invoices. An unusually well-sorted example of the last great Packard, this Caribbean is offered from a loving, knowledgeable home, and is sure to be a favorite cruiser for the next owner’s collection. This wonderful Packard is located with me in Smithfield, RI and the asking price is $66,500. More pictures at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1956-packard-caribbean-2/
  7. Hi All, Planning for a water pump rebuild. We seem to be stuck in how this water pump comes off. Please have a look at this video. I don't have an owners manual or motor manual on this engine, so its challenging us. Your thoughts are appreciated. Thank you, Tom Laferriere
  8. Carl, thank you for the feedback and suggestion. I do shoot through a slightly telephoto lens and on occasion, I see a distortion of sorts. My wide angle is just too wide, so I may have to invest in another lens. I am certainly an amateur photographer (always on the automatic setting) and always welcome feedback from anyone with more experience than me. I will play around with some new lenses, but I do seem to gravitate to this look.
  9. Without doubt, this 1932 Packard 904 Sedan is the ideal preservation class candidate for the 2020 concours season. An original time capsule with unsurpassed originality, this car has not been touched or massaged and has never been publicly displayed. Coupled with its extraordinary provenance including single-family ownership from new until 2009, now is the time to acquire this car for application to 2020 events including Pebble Beach. Unseen, untouched, unparalleled. History from new and ready for use. Please share with your car friends. Located with me in Smithfield, RI and the price is $75,000 Many pictures available. Full details at the link. https://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1932-packard-904-sedan/
  10. Mike, I listed it in the fall of 2019 for a client. Tom
  11. This is simply a great survivor Packard that was maintained its entire life. It starts easily, runs well, drives and shifts great, stops perfectly, cools and charges. Everything correct under the hood. All lights work and it is simply ready for use when you it shows up in your driveway, however I would put 4 new tires on it before motoring down the road. Motor runs smooth, but is tired. Pictures should tell the story, where else can you get a Packard like this for this price? $14,500 and located in my building in Smithfield, RI. All pictures at link: http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1927-packard-4-26-sedan
  12. 1942 Ford Super DeLuxe Station Wagon Chassis no. 18-6840075 Engine no. 18-6840075 96 bhp, 221 cu. in. flathead V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with transverse semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 114” Ford updated its successful 1941 design for 1942 with a new front end, featuring modern one-piece fenders, a stamped grille, and redesigned turn signals. The dashboard was also reconfigured, with conventional round gauges inspired by General Motors designs. Ford would produce 160,432 of the 1942 models before February 2, 1942, when the building of civilian vehicles came to a halt for the duration of World War II. This production run included a mere 5,483 of the Super DeLuxe station wagons – making this season’s model the rarest Ford “woodie” produced between 1936 and 1948. Rarity was further ensured by the fact that most of the 1942 models were driven into the ground during the war years, when the materials and care required to maintain a wooden body were in short supply. The example offered here was acquired in 1973 by John R. Anderson of Westford, Massachusetts, from whom the current owner and his father acquired it in August 1985. Together father and son embarked upon a most carefully researched restoration, with authenticity and correctness their foremost concern. Fortuitously, all of the original wood remained with the wagon, and all could be restored and preserved with the exception of a single piece above the rear window. The original engine, numbered to match the chassis, remains in place, with later 59AB heads. LeBaron Bonney supplied correct upholstery, while the vinyl roof was replaced by a skilled local upholsterer. Such was the attention to detail that while the headliner-mounted straps, for storage of lap robes, were carefully replaced, the new straps were fitted to the restored original mounting clips. The body moldings, door handles, and hubcaps are all the original components for this wagon, fully restored. Following completion of the restoration the wagon was shown only once, at a 2001 Early Ford V-8 Club of America National Meet, and there received its first Dearborn Award. It has not been shown again since, only conscientiously maintained; the owner reports that he has run the Ford every month and replaced all fluids annually. When not on the road for brief exercise runs, it has been maintained in a heated garage. The owner notes that the heater, lights, and radio still work. Accompanying are the original headliner straps; a pair of stone guards, never fitted to avoid damaging the wood; a radio blanking plate; and an original rear dustbin, configured so it can be mounted to the rear bumper without the necessity of drilling holes. Without a doubt, this is one of the most superlative 1942 Ford “woodies” extant. Many pictures available at the link. http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1942-ford-super-deluxe-station-wagon Located in Smithfield, RI and priced at $89,500. About half of the restoration cost and the car is free. 🙂
  13. This Ford Deluxe Coupe was certainly the pride in the estate collection and meant to be driven. Well maintained throughout, it starts easily hot or cold, runs smooth, drives well and will cruise all day. Upgraded wheels with radial tires gives this Ford a nice stance along with comfortable driving with its radial tires. Paint is shiny with a few blemishes from years of enjoyment. The interior, as the pictures show, is quite handsome and clean. Asking $34,500 and located with me in Smithfield, RI See link for additional photos. http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1935-ford-model-48-coupe
  14. 1938 Packard 1600 Touring Sedan Body Style – 1184 245 CI 100 HP 6 Cyl Fantastic Survivor Great Tour Car Words from the person I bought it from. I am the 3rd owner of this Genuine Survivor Packard and acquired it in 1995. This 1938 Packard 1600 has 44,000 original miles and we believe that this car has been garaged throughout its life. The exterior, motor and drivetrain are all in original condition. The interior was professionally re-done in grey wool to match the original interior back in 1996 and the electrical system was professionally converted to 12-volt in 2008, a very nice feature. The original parts from the electrical conversion have been saved and accompany the car. Seat belts were added in 1996 as well. The bumpers were also re-chromed in 2008. All gauges, lights and controls are in working order with the exception of the clock on the face of the glove box and the ammeter. The Test Drive: This car starts easily, runs very smooth, shifts perfectly, stops as it should and is simply a joy to drive. All gauges, with the exception of the ammeter, are working correctly. All lights including added directionals work perfectly. It has a working heater and defroster which is a very nice option for the cooler weather. It is ready for use upon receipt. A list of service items since 1995 is included. Cosmetically, it wears its original paint, all glass is original 1938 and all rubber is original 1938. All chrome, with the exception of the bumpers, is original. Interior was refreshed and is a pleasant place to reside. I used this car during the fall, winter and spring months…with a working heater, is a pleasure! History: The car was originally purchased by the Pastor at St. Anne’s Parish in Fall River, MA. We originally thought this was the late Father James F. Lyons, but Father Lyons was not ordained until 1943, so the car must have been ordered by Father Lyons’ predecessor. Directional lights were added at some time before the mid-sixties and work perfectly. In the mid-sixties, the Church wanted to renovate the Rectory and asked Dick Welshman to plumb the bathrooms with high-end fixtures. When the Parish got the invoice for the bathroom fixtures, they asked Dick if he would take the Packard in barter exchange. Dick and his wife Lenora drove the car infrequently and maintained it as required. You can still see an original Texaco maintenance sticker in the door frame dating to May 26, 1972 when the car had 30,000 miles. Dick had a fancy for restoring cars, and became most fond of Corvettes. He started to accumulate Corvettes and would do frame-up restorations of them. He decided in 1995 that he did not have the time nor space for the Packard and offered it for sale. When I heard about the opportunity to own a piece of pre-war American history, I decided to purchase it. Our kids were pretty young at the time, and we would take the car out on Sundays for ice cream and scenic rides. With the demands of work and keeping up with family and projects around the house, I have been able to drive it mostly on weekends. Each winter, the car is put into storage, as I have never driven the car in the winter since owning it. In the twenty-three years that I have owned the car, we have only driven the car about 12,500 miles. Now that our kids are off to college, and our professional careers are increasing in demands of our time, we’ve decided that it would be best to pass the car on to a new owner who can appreciate this magnificent piece of Americana. Asking $19,500 and its located in Smithfield, RI More pictures and details at the link. Please take note of the seldom seen 1938 Packard Firewall decal intact. http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1938-packard-1600-touring-sedan
  15. The Cadillac Series 60 easily became the company’s best selling model which included more than half of all Cadillac’s sold in its introductory year. Cadillac improved the engine for the following year, enlarging its capacity to 346 cubic-inches and increasing its horsepower to 135. The Series 60 was an important model for Cadillac, because it continued its proud tradition of stylish bodies with exceptional performance. This 1938 Cadillac Series 38-60 with style number 38-6119 has been owned by the same caring owner for the last 54 years and is unrestored and original. It starts easily, runs smooth, cools properly, charges wonderfully and brakes as its should. It cruises nicely along with its 3.92:1 rear axle ratio and its 124″ wheelbase. This car can be used and enjoyed immediately upon receipt. Tons of pictures and more detail available at the link. Asking $14,500 and its located in my building in Smithfield, RI http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1938-cadillac-model-60-sedan
  16. This is an interesting older thread that I am bringing to the top. I, like Steve, have admired these cars since a kid. I am wondering after reading all this, did Bearcat have its own rear axle ratio? If a Bearcat was converted from a cart, I am wondering about the rear axle gear being different. Maybe a sales brochure would have the rear axle ratio's listed?