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Everything I read and people I have spoken to has said 060 is very easy and useable on the 401. My son will do the sonic check on the block once he gets it and we have both agreed keeping the 040 over is perfectly fine with out plans. We want to keep the engine as streetable as possible but still pushing the limits to squeeze what we can out of it. There is a happy medium....we're gonna find it :) I do know that the staff at the school is eager to see the nailhead, they arent used to a unique engine like this. they teach typical Chevy/Ford small/big block primarily with NASCAR/NHRA power applications

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Spent about 3.5 hours cleaning the frame today. It looks more like a car frame then a petrified lump of something. I have removed about a 5 gallon bucket of dirt from the car since I started. Soon the dirt will end and the new stuff will start getting ordered.

For the record, I found a second serial number on the frame IN THE BACK. Its between the last two body bolts on along the drivers side on top.

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I havent fallen off the face of the earth, just nothing worth taking pics of to really update. Been spending the past weeks cleaning the frame. I have the rear axle and suspension pieces removed. Still need to break down the front suspension but all in all its coming along. The frame has been cleaning up nice with just some wire brush and emery cloth work. I ordered some rust encapsulation and paint from Eastwood which should be here next week. By This time next week I should be dirt free finally and handling clean parts as we turn to assembly.

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With a little fiddling I was able to use the spring compressor I bought to get the drivers side suspension apart today. Took about 3 hours, I still have to remove the control arms, but the steering is apart. It doesnt help that its an archeology dig to get to the nuts.

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Been following your updates. Great info for when I dig into mine. I know about those archeological digs for nuts and bolts. Is yours sand or dirt? Sand is easier, we have dirt... :(

Mike

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Mines all sand, but its hard as a rock. The wire brush gets laughed at. I have to use a small flat tip screw driver and a paint scraper to really scrape it off. Ive removed about 10 dust pans full of stuff so far and still have the passenger side suspension to do and remove the underside of the frame.

Oh and drag the frame out side so I can tip it up and dump out the stuff thats INSIDE.

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For the record, I found a second serial number on the frame IN THE BACK. Its between the last two body bolts on along the drivers side on top.

Ok that confirms the two 65 frame VINs are in the same general area as the 66s. Thanks for posting

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Rinsed out the frame today, alot of sand and silt removed and a bunch of rocks. I cleaned my garage floor (it needed it) and then brought the frame back in the garage. Final round of cleaning over the next few days and paint next week. Engine got picked up by the shipping company, so its on the road to Houston to get built by my son at school. A few instructors are curious to see what they can do to a nailhead, none of them have ever worked one before.

p.s. updated the website www.teamalini.com

Edited by alini
added post script comment (see edit history)

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Rinsed out the frame today, alot of sand and silt removed and a bunch of rocks. I cleaned my garage floor (it needed it) and then brought the frame back in the garage. Final round of cleaning over the next few days and paint next week. Engine got picked up by the shipping company, so its on the road to Houston to get built by my son at school. A few instructors are curious to see what they can do to a nailhead, none of them have ever worked one before.

p.s. updated the website www.teamalini.com

Never seen a Nailhead before and your going to let them rebuild it to some NASCAR specs ....LOL.... and your gonna race Rob to the finish line on the resto.... sorry man ... it aint easy ....but you have to be real.....dont paint your frame unless you get it blasted cause regardless of how much hot water and chemicals you pour on it you will never get any paint to stick for the long run.....I did my first frame up / off when I was 18 in the early 80 's and have done 5 since and have learned that you can't cut corners, it always shows up in 6 months and you will hate yourself... My 12 year old basically took my 65 Riv apart ...THATS THE EASY PART....he is a tool handling prodigy if I do say so myself ...but it has taken at least 15 super talented NON 12 year

old individuals in there own respective line of expertise to HELP me put the car back together...THESE CARS ARE LAYERS UPON LAYERS WHEN IT COMES TIME TO REASSEMBLE...i guess what Iam getting at is if your in a rush on a Riv and dont listen to the old experts on this forum or other nailhead forums you will be up for a big letdown...and if you wanna go REAL fast put a Kenne Bell on your Camaro .....the Riv is meant to be seen not heard.....:rolleyes:

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Not sure where you are getting your info from. From post #21 in this thread "The engine if useable will be sent to my son who is a student at the School for Automotive Machinists. As part of his education he will be doing a full rebuild of the engine, to include port and polish the head with flow bench to ensure its the same across the board. Our goal is a streetable 400hp/500lbs 401 engine. But first to make sure we can use the engine." The SCHOOL builds engines to NASCAR spec, because thats what they teach. Since they dont typically deal with Nailheads and my kid needs an engine to rebuild....just to show technical understanding of some techniques, I sent the nailhead to them. At no time did I imply I was looking for them to build it to NASCAR Specs.

If you read my post to Rob correctly (where I closed with 'Just kidding') and if you understood the relationship I have created with Rob, you would know I was kidding. No respectful car builder would rush a rebuild.

If you asked me about the frame...I was rinsing the dirt out of the frame. if you have been following the thread you would know that this car was riddled with dust and dirt everywhere....including INSIDE the frame. So I pulled it outside so I could run water through it and clear the dirt. This was by no means my last step before painting.

I appreciate you spending the time about how great you and your 12 year olds mechanical ability is, but you dont know me or my ability. Thanks for stopping by and enjoy the show ;)

p.s. the Camaro is 1 of 500, it will get no modifications...except the emblem change I made already.

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Not sure where you are getting your info from. From post #21 in this thread "The engine if useable will be sent to my son who is a student at the School for Automotive Machinists. As part of his education he will be doing a full rebuild of the engine, to include port and polish the head with flow bench to ensure its the same across the board. Our goal is a streetable 400hp/500lbs 401 engine. But first to make sure we can use the engine." The SCHOOL builds engines to NASCAR spec, because thats what they teach. Since they dont typically deal with Nailheads and my kid needs an engine to rebuild....just to show technical understanding of some techniques, I sent the nailhead to them. At no time did I imply I was looking for them to build it to NASCAR Specs.

If you read my post to Rob correctly (where I closed with 'Just kidding') and if you understood the relationship I have created with Rob, you would know I was kidding. No respectful car builder would rush a rebuild.

If you asked me about the frame...I was rinsing the dirt out of the frame. if you have been following the thread you would know that this car was riddled with dust and dirt everywhere....including INSIDE the frame. So I pulled it outside so I could run water through it and clear the dirt. This was by no means my last step before painting.

I appreciate you spending the time about how great you and your 12 year olds mechanical ability is, but you dont know me or my ability. Thanks for stopping by and enjoy the show ;)

p.s. the Camaro is 1 of 500, it will get no modifications...except the emblem change I made already.

There are alot of us "watching the show"

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After a little delivery snafu on the part of the shipping company. The Engine has arrived in Houston. The Students helped unpacked it. Now their fun begins. They will be using it as a visual training aide and the head class will be looking it over to review how restrictive the design is. They will take the next few months as they dig in, teach/learn and do some mild machine work to rebuild it. I'll be getting a full break down of condition of parts in the next few days as they actually disaamble it and measure all the journals and cylinders.

My son said alot of students were very inquisitive as they looked things over. Its not a small block chevy or ford, so they should all learn alot from this.

FOR THE RECORD, I have supplied them with every link of information I have found and been provided about the nailhead and the valve seats and guides and I have been on the phone with the staff so they are fully aware of my expectations so they dont over do it.....before I get bashed again

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After a little delivery snafu on the part of the shipping company. The Engine has arrived in Houston. The Students helped unpacked it. Now their fun begins. They will be using it as a visual training aide and the head class will be looking it over to review how restrictive the design is. They will take the next few months as they dig in, teach/learn and do some mild machine work to rebuild it. I'll be getting a full break down of condition of parts in the next few days as they actually disaamble it and measure all the journals and cylinders.

My son said alot of students were very inquisitive as they looked things over. Its not a small block chevy or ford, so they should all learn alot from this.

FOR THE RECORD, I have supplied them with every link of information I have found and been provided about the nailhead and the valve seats and guides and I have been on the phone with the staff so they are fully aware of my expectations so they dont over do it.....before I get bashed again

Glad to hear the engine arrived safe. I'd advise giving Tom Telesco a call and talk to him about what he reccomends in regards to making the nailhead breathe better. He's a supper nice guy to talk with, and I'm sure he wouldn't mind talking to you. He can give you invaluable information that you can pass on to your son and the school.

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If the school would talk to and listen to Tom T. and/or Russ Martin, we could have a whole new generation of nailhead rebuilders. Chris, in one of your previous posts, you mentioned that you'd sent the school some things to read through. Was one of them the tech article written by Russ Martin? If not, it's available on his website. The attached is just one of the articles he's put on his website for public information. If you look at the entire website there's a "Tech Info" tab with tons of more information.

Nailing Down the Buick Nailhead |

Ed

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Cleaning up some of the parts before we start painting frame and suspension pieces. This was two hours of work getting to this point.

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Been a while since I posted, but lately we have knocked alot out with my son home from school for the holidays. Got the frame painted and the front suspension pieces cleaned and painted. New ball joints, 2 inch drop springs, new bushings all installed. Ordering brake pieces tomorrow and hopefully get them done before he heads back. Its nice to finally put something together, rather than apart.

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Hey Chris N,

How is the Engine rebuild going? Do I remember correctly you sent it to your son's school as an Educational-rebuild?

Thanks

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The engine is torn down completely, everything looks good. The valve springs have all been checked and all within a few pounds of each other, the valves and seats all look good as well as the guides, so apart from the angle valve job nothing is needed there. The crank mic checks good, never been cut. The cylinders we knew were bored 40 over, he still needs to make sure they are straight. He was cleaning the parts when he left to come home. They are going to flow bench the heads and see where they can improve on them. We should be okay with reusing the bottom end as is, just re-ring and bearing it.

The cam looked good, but we plan on swapping it out and we need to see if we can replace the plastic timing gears. They look good, but metal would be prefered.

The valve springs have them puzzled, they have never seen a valve spring so weak before, but they are within book value.You can compress them with your fingers. This is not ideal because it can lead to alot of valve float at higher RPMs, so we may be upgrading them.

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Nail Head Valve springs are soft, that is normal. A 401 is not a high reving engine, so I'd stick with the stock style valve springs. With these motors, it's all about the torque down low in the rev range.

Good to see you are making progress. Keep at it.

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Here are some pics of before and after. Keep in mind I'm considering this a rebuild, not a restoration. So if parts are still useable I am reusing them, so things like the bump stop are still showing their wear, but its in good shape otherwise. But I think its a 10000% better than when I started. Brake drums got dropped off at the media blaster today, previous owner painted them. Brakes are rebuilt, front suspension is done, steering to be done this weekend. Then move on to Axle and Transmission. My son has the engine hot tanked and getting ready to start machine work.

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I think when you're finished cleaning this thing up you'll be able to build a beach volleyball court for your back yard.

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After way too much procrastination and a few days under the car when it was on blocks scraping 50 years of oil and road dirt off the top rail of the frame on the driver's side and finding nothing, I spent 20 minutes on the passenger side and found the 'hidden' chassis/VIN number. If it hadn't been for you guys, I wouldn't have known where to start to look, so thank you!

Colin

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