Jump to content

edinmass

Members
  • Content Count

    9,086
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    193

Posts posted by edinmass

  1. 16 hours ago, alsancle said:

    Brunn Lincoln.

     

    image.png.b1b91c759ff8d97addb1b6415bfafff0.png

     

    16 hours ago, alsancle said:

    Brunn Lincoln.

     

    image.png.b1b91c759ff8d97addb1b6415bfafff0.png

    T

    This car was last seen in Michigan getting some wood repair. It’s the double entery saloon, one door, that opens from both ends, done in Brewster Green. I saw restoration photos of it by the current owner, who may or may not still be with us, around 1995. Had a great talk with him about the car.

    • Like 3
  2. 17 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

    I know of a 1930 Cadillac V16 roadster sitting in a boat house up here that is a basket case. The body was restored and painted about 30 years ago in California where the car came from. I remember he had the chrome plating and engine done and then stored away. I know the owner very well and I believe he will never get back at it.

     

    With real correct V-16 roadsters bringing seven figures to mid 1.5’s it will get finished some day. Maybe some encouragement to hike to just pass it on would be a good idea, while the market for them is strong. I’m not a quifiled buyer.........there are plenty of them chasing those cars. 

    • Like 1
  3. AJ’s 1931 Rep Royal Full Custom Dietrich was a bright red tomato with gold fenders..........and it was the New York Auto Show car. I agree with Walt G. that 99.5 percent of the cars colors were very conservative. My favorite over the top example is the P1 Springfield Rolls Royce, with a Murphy Disappearing Top Roadster body, done in chrome yellow (Packard Chrome Yellow factory offering) with a raspberry interior. 

    08EE418F-3EC6-4632-B4F3-C2D199E4495A.png

  4. Reguardless of how expensive a correct radiator core is, it’s much cheaper and lots more fun to have a car that runs, drives, and doesn’t tear itself apart because of the cost of a radiator. I like to drive cars ten times more than look at them. We just did a new radiator on a Springfield Phantom 1 that was the original, car was running cool, had no leaks, but tested bad at the shop in flow and heat transfer. Why risk a high dollar engine? I bet most pre war cars out on the road today have radiators that are only fifty percent function left from the factory, but it’s also probably enough cooling not to cause a problem.

    • Like 2
  5. It’s not Cadillac or Pierce. It appears to be a 1950’s Delco  set up possibly used on Seagrave fire trucks. The post war trucks used smaller diameter distributors like this cap takes, and they were dual plug 12’s for a total of 24 plugs and two distributors. They are a handful to make work correctly.  In the upper left of the photo you can see the dual drive set up and the bottom of the two distributors.

    AF325B10-BDD1-4643-94CC-51F8EEAEA148.png

  6. Running  rough at 35 mph has nothing to do with a chassis or driveline vibration. We need a better description of you issue. Get it up to speed in a safe area, shut off the engine and push in the clutch at the problem speed, and start trying to figure it out from there. Tires and driveshaft will continue the same issue with the motor off and the clutch in. If it stops when you do this, then look at the engine.

    • Like 2
  7. 2 hours ago, Curti said:

    Very well done, a good looking pickup !

     

    I agree, well done. We have a 1930 Pierce Series A Limo cut down into a pick up that was done in Rochester Ny back in 1938. It was done by a body shop and towing company, and it’s got great lines, and were about twenty percent done with the restoration. We should be back on it full time in about a year. Unfortunately I don’t have any photos to post. It’s much more difficult to get the lines and look of the vehicle correct..........they really paid attention to detail and even had it lettered and striped when they finished it. Must have been the fanciest pick up in the state of New York.

    • Like 1
  8. 1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

    Do you mean the one I posted photos of? If so, I cannot WAIT to see it.

     

    It’s one of two, if I am not mistaken. I last saw it three or four years ago, all apart and under restoration. (Unless it’s the other one.) It was sold to a new collector according to the grapevine, and I was told that car (the one I saw) will now be finished in the reasonable near future. From it’s condition, I expect to see it in the next twenty four to thirty six  months. I can think of about twenty five collectors who would give their left arm to be the first to show it at one of the big concours. 

    • Thanks 1
  9. 2 minutes ago, jeff_a said:

    There were three Peerless cars from their foray into the "multi-cylinder race" besides the surviving V-16 in the Crawford Museum. One V-12 and two V-16s. Chances are good that they were scrapped and became aircraft components. But they aren't figments of the imagination: all four were driven to Burbank, Calif. for re-bodies by Murphy in 1931 from Ohio carrying bodies from the straight line. Supposedly a blind rear quarter sedan was nearly done when the BOD decided breweries were more profitable...

     

    Since it's hard to tell what the illustrations are on the coachbuilt.com site are(unlabeled) I don't know what this Murphy design is......but might be what such a Peerless would have looked like:oo1931-Due-Mur-Bev2.jpg

     

    The Peerless twelve has survived and I saw it quite a bit over the past four or five years, I believe it’s in a museum on the west coast now. 

  10. 22 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

    I did take 40 years to locate a Pre WWII race car  I once rode in only to find out it can't be bought. 

     

    Bob

     

    A P1 Ascot is a hell of a find.............at anytime. The race car can be bought.......it just takes a bigger checkbook to pry it out.........I would bet that there are less than twenty pre war American cars that can’t be bought at any price. Most people will let a car go if the offer is above market, most, not all.

  11. Problem is there are some that I can’t mention because we are still looking for them! Also, it’s common for cars to go underground down a deep hole, not to be seen again. Sadly, many great American cars are now no longer residing in the US. As the major cars prices start approaching the numbers of the great types of art, we will see more of them falling of the face of the earth for years at a time. And for the rates auction houses are now getting, there will be lots more private treaty sales that never see the light of day. 

  12. There are two types of “missing” cars......ones that a few people know where they are, and are slowly working on being the first guy in the door when the time comes, and the true missing car that no one knows it’s current whereabouts. I found that missing 32 Pierce 12 LeBaron coupe after hunting for it for more than ten years, it truly was “lost to time” except for the owner and myself. Couldn’t make a deal on it, and the owner never called me back or left my info for his family...........it was a personality issue.......his or mine? I’m not sure. Here is one I worked on and off for more than twenty five years before I landed it. The 1932 New York Auto Show car, the “first” Pierce 12 Sport Pheaton......it was out of the public eye since 1951, some knew where it was, but no one had ever seen it except family members. I kept working the car.........and i landed it. Body number one. It’s the only true Pierce  twelve pheaton in existence. 

     

    I could tell tell you what I am chasing now, but then I would have to kill you........🤫

    2235D8A1-B244-4946-852A-62D5132B3A60.jpeg

    • Like 3
    • Thanks 1
×
×
  • Create New...