JoelsBuicks

Finishing my Buick Shop

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Maybe I'll try spraying my finish now.  Getting sick of all the brushing and sanding with crappy results and I used to varnish boats.  Probably the cheap crappy varnish from the hardware store. 

Looks great. 

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On ‎7‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 8:07 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Trim around the windows today.  Got a little cleaning and touch up left to do.

 

0E918559-FC6A-4F31-ABB6-F9348463DDA8.jpeg

 

 

Those windows look GREAT!

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On 7/4/2018 at 3:53 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

I haven’t talked about heating but they are basically a heat pump and can pull heat out of 0 F air.

 

You are in for a surprise unless these heat pumps are different then mine.  

The colder it gets, the worse it heats.  I have to use Emergency heat to keep the house war when it gets below 30.

 

Does great for A?C though.

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It amazing what you can do if you have talent.  

I can't wait until you finish the building and start on the car.......you will make all of us look like the amateurs we are.

 

Bill.......you must have something wrong with your system,  I have had heat pumps for the last 40 years and the auxiliary heat only kicks on when

stays in the 20's or if the outside unit gets iced over from a freezing rain.   I am heating and cooling 2100 sq ft with a single unit (single story)

Edited by Barney Eaton (see edit history)

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On 7/4/2018 at 12:01 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

 

Buick Gardens Sales & Service May be able to use such a unit, one line set for the office and the other for the display area

 

You've got my attention. A precursory look into my needs would be a 48K unit split into 36k for the garage (1300 sq ft) and 12 k for the office (300sq ft)   Again this is only a precursory look but since I am seeing these systems (self installed)   saving approximately half of the first quote I received for a duct type system, I will be looking into it more. 

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Oh and as you might know, I discovered they can be had with concealed duct that can be installed in the ceiling of the office. That really caught my attention.

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6 hours ago, Bill Stoneberg said:

You are in for a surprise unless these heat pumps are different then mine.  

The colder it gets, the worse it heats.  I have to use Emergency heat to keep the house war when it gets below 30.

Bill I had the same experience as you with two previous houses that had heat pumps.  Both were rural homes and I changed out systems to natural gas, just for that reason.

 

I was skeptical when I heard these Fujitsu’s would produce heat down to 0F - even to the point of installing supplemental propane just in case.  For the last six years, we’ve been at or close to 0 F only a few times but that unit heated very well and didn’t once require propane.  I’m counting on these news units to have that kind of performance. They should because 10F is used as their design ambient low.

 

 

Edited by JoelsBuicks
Improper use of “there” (see edit history)

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After seeing the Fujitsu’s installed rough-in and later finished, I wouldn’t hesitate to do it myself.  I would need a vac pump and a way to test with 600lbs Nitrogen pressure. I already have a set of gauges and a copper flaring tool.  My systems each needed a 20 amp 240v breaker.

 

Needed to edit this to be more thorough. The copper tube line set uses flare fittings at the inside units.  They have to be cut to a certain length and then flared.  My installer pressure tests the connections using 600psi nitrogen because he has witnessed many leaks at these fittings.  In fact one of my units had a very small leak but a leak nonetheless. The line fitting was taken apart and I examined both mating surfaces and they looked great.  We just rotated the fitting and tightened it back up and the leak was gone.  The HVAC guy said this is the Achilles heel of these units.  

 

 

Edited by JoelsBuicks
Clarification (see edit history)

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Thank you all again for the compliments, they are encouraging to me and I can’t hardly wait to get my Buick work going again.

 

 

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8104E5EF-DA4F-40CA-80BC-3C53A8EDA1A6.jpeg

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Air Conditioning (AC),  I’ve always wanted to write a disquisition about AC but I’ll spare us the lengthy treatise and focus on what I find to be some interesting Information and germane to our Buick shops.  

 

Thirty five years ago I was studying Chemical Engineering and heat transfer in particular. I was fascinated by the complex math associated with non-steady state thermodynamics. By then, I had also spent a lot of time working for a HVAC servicer and installer.  I was able to put both of these experiences together to “entertain” my own mind; absent any big mysteries about this science.  

 

If you don’t feel guilty about running a dishwasher in the summertime or allowing your towel to dry out inside then consider yourself lucky.  For me, I have to “count” the molecules of water that AC’s first have to remove in order for them to cool the air -  well, most of them anyhow.  We all lean towards the things we know the most, and someone once said, “he who is good with a hammer treats everything like a nail.”  I’m afraid I’ve spent way too much time pondering this stuff.

 

When it comes to our shops, AC and heating for that matter certainly follow the same thermodynamic laws but vary widely based on the space we are controlling, insulation (heat gain or loss) and especially, how we use that space.  I’ve really been wanting to talk about that last item, because it makes a huge difference in our approach to climate control.

 

Some of us have weekend spaces and others, like myself, might spend every day and all day in the shop.  For sporadic use, I would advise the biggest unit you can find (probably 5 ton) and try to find a used one for almost no cost.  You would be amazed at how many good units get replaced because someone suggested it was nearing the end of its life. Inefficient you say?  Remember, it’s sporadic use - but also consider this:  when you go to your shop and want quick cooling or heating, the biggest unit get you there quickest.  Oh yeah,  just put a single big duct up there that is oriented to create circulation in the room.  

 

If you spend a lot of time and consecutive days in your shop, go for a good high efficiency unit, try to improve insulation, and by all means get the water out.  This brings me back to my AC nemesis, the dastardly dishwasher.  In the summer, I have to pay to heat up that water and then I have to pay to condense it.  Everyone’s AC has one thing in common, they all have to remove water - down to the dewpoint temp at the evaporator.  Ok, so it’s expensive to remove water but what’s worse is that it consumes duty that is needed to remove heat so that we’ll stay cool.  So, if you use your shop daily, get rid of the water and keep it that way.  Don’t open the doors and windows on those cooler mornings because your AC will then have to remove that water.

 

Well this turned out longer than I wanted but I felt I needed to say it. 

 

Thanks for listening!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)

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Yes Ben!  It’s a horrible affliction.  Just like that dishwasher is going to stay put, so will that shower....and the teapot, the potted plants, the washing machine...and many other sources. Just a week ago I told my wife that burning those old light bulbs cost us double in the summer.  She reminded me they are almost free in the winter.  Me and my wife both married ChemE’s 😳.

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11 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

  For me, I have to “count” the molecules of water that AC’s first have to remove in order for them to cool the air

 

You would have had fun counting the molecules of water at our house this last week. Molecules on the inside of windows, on all the ac duct work and insulation and about a 1/4 inch thick on the basement floor. FRIGGIN WATER MOLECULES EVERY FRIGGIN WHERE!!!!!!!  Yep, Mr Thermodynamic Man, I'm sure you know exactly what the culprit was. A big ass millipede had crawled up into the discharge end of the condensate drain down in the woods below the house and backed the water up to the ac unit. Every mans nightmare, while working joyously on your favorite project in 95* heat to be told by your wife "Hon, you need to come up to the house, the basement is flooded" 

OK enough of honing in on your thread with my problems. But I do have a few questions/comments re your last post.

 

11 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

 when you go to your shop and want quick cooling or heating, the biggest unit get you there quickest.

 

BUT, if that unit is too big, it will cool too quickly, thus not running long enough to pull all them pesty water molecules out of the air right?

 

11 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Oh yeah,  just put a single big duct up there that is oriented to create circulation in the room.  

 

So should I decide to go with a conventional system, I might not need that 25 ft of spiral duct work running along and obstructing the view of that kaleidoscope of corrosion ceiling of mine that the AC guy included in the estimate, eh? Just one big ass vent in the interior gable shooting out over the cars and work area. I like that idea.

 

11 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

If you spend a lot of time and consecutive days in your shop, go for a good high efficiency unit, try to improve insulation, and by all means get the water out. 

 

While I probably won't spend a LOT of time and consecutive days in the BS&SG, my cars certainly will. After all that is my main objective, to keep the mildew out of my cars. I've probably spent enough $$ on DampRid over the last 20 years to have paid for an ac system. I'm planning on running the AC full time. While not humanly occupied,  at about 80*/summer and 50* winter just to keep the moisture down.

 

11 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Don’t open the doors and windows on those cooler mornings because your AC will then have to remove that water.

 

 

but I love the sound of lifting those cane bolts out of their drilled concrete holes and swinging those 3 inch thick wood and iron clad doors open and being met with the cool fresh morning air and  fog coming off Buick pond. Now thanks to you, I'll be thinking " Oh gawd, look at all them damn water molecules coming into my garage, wonder how much it’s going to cost to get all them suckers back out"  Thanks Joel, thanks a lot buddy!!! 😁🤪🤣

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, MrEarl said:

BUT, if that unit is too big, it will cool too quickly, thus not running long enough to pull all them pesty water molecules out of the air right?

Well now that is a good point and it’s a good example of why such a discussion just can’t effectively be abbreviated. That oversized unit being used sporadically needs to be set and run at its lowest temp setting until the humidity is reasonable.   It makes me wonder if there is such a thing as a humistat with a temperature override or maybe the other way around?  But again, your point is legitimate and it reminded me of a system I built with a thermostat control and a timer override.  The space was too large and under insulated and that unit needed to run all the time.  

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