JoelsBuicks

Finishing my Buick Shop

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Been awhile, anything going on to report on Joel?

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Well I'm glad you asked.  I'd call it fairly unremarkable progress but steady nonetheless. I have been working on completing the wiring and I'm about 90% at this point.  I'm amazed at just how much wiring and how many circuits it takes to do this job.  It's also expensive and a shop this large has at least 2000 linear feet.  

 

My my plan is to get the internal rooms ready for insulation, plywood and Sheetrock.  I will hire these done very soon I hope.  This also includes the completion of the paint booth.  

 

I recently used the sawmill to make 2x4's for framing the upstairs rooms.  I think I mentioned earlier that I'll have two climate controlled rooms upstairs.  One room for recreation and the other either for storage or both.

 

Here's a few pics that I wanted to share.  I put old style 300W bulbs in those porch lights.  Nostalgic reasons only; LEDs are coming soon.  Also, I decided to leave the emergency lighting function for the main lights.  When I turn these lights off, a battery will keep one bulb lit until the battery dies. Lastly, I installed three more fixtures to provide minimal building lighting in the main portion so that it doesn't cost me a fortune to burn a bunch of lights when I don't need them.  

 

Thanks again for asking!

Joel

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I think that October rain was the last substantial rain as it is very dry here now.

 

Just a bit of progress to share.  I don’t know where the time goes but it seems like I’ve entered a slow motion parallel universe.   Better planning would probably help.

 

Inside my shop there will be two upstairs rooms that will be climate controlled.  Although these have yet to be framed in, I decided that a good set of stairs were in order to safely access that space.  

 

The stringers for this stair case were sawed on my mill.  Each tread is made from glued up boards in a ‘cutting board’ style.  They are 13” breadth, 1-3/4” thick, and the stairs are 36” wide.  Step height is 7”.

 

I decided to clad the rough sawed stringers in walnut.  This isn’t finished but it’s getting close.

 

 

 

 

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Gorgeous Joel. That had to take some time. Can't wait to see them finished. Banisters, handrails. 

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7 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Gorgeous Joel. That had to take some time. Can't wait to see them finished. Banisters, handrails. 

 

 

  Me, I wanna see the whole enchilada!  This shop is an everyman's dream. Well, at least mine.

 

  Joel, you, sir, are an artist.

 

  Ben

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1 hour ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

  Joel, you, sir, are an artist.

 

  Ben

 

 

Ain't he though. And creative as *.  I've always said " if'n ya ain't creatin, then you're just consumin"  

 

 

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Once again I say thanks for the kind words.  Unfortunately, my artistic, right-brain atrophied during 5 years of engineering school indoctrination.  It’s not been an easy recovery but I try.  Retirement is helping; I’m amazed at just how much ‘off hours thinking time’ I was spending for my job-but not anymore.

 

Pics below show some more stair progress.  The walnut was sawed on my mill many years ago.  It’s plentiful around here and I have enough for about 8 lifetimes.  More yet to do but getting closer.  Handrail will probably be walnut but supporting structure - I have some thoughts but that’s all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jeeze, you're wrapping it in Walnut, didn't see that coming!  Gorgeous!!!

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I’ve been trying to get my internal rooms finished.  There are two rooms downstairs and two rooms up - yet to be framed-in.  They will be climate controlled and right now, I wish they were done!  I want to get my Amish friends back here for about three days work.  Then, it will be time for sheet rock and taping.  The pics show the two downstairs rooms; together they are 25 x 39.

 

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Hey, for a little while on Wednesday my thumb had two nails!  

 

Dang!  A toenailing job gone wrong.  The point of the nail was pushing out the other side but didn’t break the skin.  A 15 mile drive to the Indian Clinic took care of it.  Very sore right now but much better than yesterday.  Hurt the old ego too.

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Hey, for a little while on Wednesday my thumb had two nails!  

 

Dang!  A toenailing job gone wrong.  The point of the nail was pushing out the other side but didn’t break the skin.  A 15 mile drive to the Indian Clinic took care of it.  Very sore right now but much better than yesterday.  Hurt the old ego too.

 

 

 

 

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OUCH!  That had to hurt going both ways!  I feel for ya Joel!

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Oh crap, Joel!!! Please tell me it missed the bone. Care to tell us how it happened so maybe I won't do the same thing.

 

So you're putting the decking down and the Amish crew will come in and frame it up. Who's doing the Sheetrock?  How will the lower plywood walls be finished out? Is that going to be like a balcony at the top of stairs landing or?

 

Hope that thumb heals up ok with no complications. Up on your tetnus shots I take it

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Interesting thing, X-rays showed it through the bone just behind the joint.  But, the nail blocks a lot of the X-rays compared to bone and it wasn’t easy to see it clearly.  A post extraction X-ray did not show evidence of bone damage and the doc declared that it didn’t strike the bone.  I’m sure that is the case because today it is almost back to normal.

 

I sort of recreated the crime scene showing what I was doing when this happened.  Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

 

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Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)

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6 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Interesting thing, X-rays showed it through the bone just behind the joint.  But, the nail blocks a lot of the X-rays compared to bone and it wasn’t easy to see it clearly.  A post extraction X-ray did not show evidence of bone damage and the doc declared that it didn’t strike the bone.  I’m sure that is the case because today it is almost back to normal.

 

I sort of recreated the crime scene showing what I was doing when this happened.  Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

 

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Ouch  :(

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43 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

So the nail traveled a couple of feet before going into your thumb. I've shot like that a bunch of times. A nailgun is so big and cumbersome, I can understand exactly how it happened. Thanks for the "reenactment"  Joel. I am about to start on some more framing and will be doing a good bit of toenailing so will keep that thumb with two nails picture in my mind. Surprised but glad see it healing so fast and to hear that it didn't fracture the bone into splinters which would have certainly made matters much worse.

Man it's a shame some of that rough cut framing is going to get covered up.

 

Question. How are you attaching the sole plates of your walls to the concrete? I used adhesive along with flat cut concrete nails for some of mine then borrowed a Hilti gun for some.

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The base plates are attached using 1/2” anchor bolts approximately every 4ft.  I use a big heavy duty hammer drill and drill through plate and all of the concrete.  Then I hammer in the bolt with a nut and washer and tighten.

 

 

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I used some of them on the back welding room and was considering using them again. Thanks

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Mr. Earl, Having poured a fair amount of Concrete for foundations in many types of buildings I prefer to use foundation bolts put in immediately after the pour is down. However that is a bit late fir your job. I as Joel recommend 1/2" sleeved insert style "Red Head" anchors every 4' along the wall length and 6" from any and all openings. I Do Not go along with drilling clear through the slab. This has in a very few cases caused cracking from the edge of the slab to the insert and beyond. If your sole plates are 2" nominal thickness (1 1/2 actual) I would recommend at least a 5" x 1/2" Red Head insert depending on slab thickness. Drill through the plate and into the slab 1/2" deeper than the anchor length, clean the holes of dust/debris, drive in the anchor and tighten er up. This is work I gar-untee you but you will have a safe long standing shop. Just my two coppers worth but based on experience. M     

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Mark’s comments made me see a need to clarify what I had said.  On the walls at the perimeter of my building, I have a thickened edge, 12” deep and 10” wide with three 1/2” rebar in there.  These anchors did not go all the way through but did go in about 5”.  The internal walls did penetrate through the 4” slab in order to minimize the possibility of cracking.  If you only drilled to say, 3-1/2” then the expansion of the anchor would be occurring in the top 2-1/2” and breakout is a possibility.

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Joel, no offense was meant by my comments. These are two different types of concrete slabs needing different types of anchors for their walls. I hope your hand is well on the mend from the nail gun accident. Been there done that also with an air stapler for putting lath on walls. Two great shops by the way, keep up the good work.  M 

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Oh that’s no problem Mark.  When I went back and read what I wrote I was really talking about an exception rather than a rule because I had my mind on these internal rooms.  They are holding very little load.  Several years ago I would hammer drill a 3/16” hole and stuff a couple bare copper wires in it and drive in a 16 penny nail.   Thing I like about that rotary hammer drill is that I have a hole in a fraction of a minute.  

 

Thanks for the well wishes, thumb was used a lot today and it’s pretty sore right now.

Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)

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Got a confession, I bought more power poles.  Just another deal I couldn’t pass up.  I got 31 never used Oregon Doug Fir poles that are 80 and 90 feet long - 2013 vintage.  The deal also included cleaning up a bunch of very sound poles that weren’t so new but large diameter.  

 

I probably have have enough to build two or three shops like my last one.  They are in far better shape than the ones I used.  I split them with a friend who wants to build a shop.  I have no plans for my half.

 

the pics show the long poles that were hauled in and the pile of poles we cut to 16’-4” in order to saw out full 16 ft.

 

I think I need counseling.

 

 

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NOW THAT PUTS THE SIZE OF THOSE THINGS INTO PERSPECTIVE!

Edited by dei (see edit history)

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On 1/13/2018 at 12:07 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Got a confession, I bought more power poles.  Just another deal I couldn’t pass up.  I got 31 never used Oregon Doug Fir poles that are 80 and 90 feet long - 2013 vintage.  The deal also included cleaning up a bunch of very sound poles that weren’t so new but large diameter.  

 

I probably have have enough to build two or three shops like my last one.  They are in far better shape than the ones I used.  I split them with a friend who wants to build a shop.  I have no plans for my half.

 

the pics show the long poles that were hauled in and the pile of poles we cut to 16’-4” in order to saw out full 16 ft

 

80 and 90 feet long NEW DOUGLAS FIR "treated" poles!!!!! And delivered I am betting or hoping?!?!   I love Douglas Fir period!  Congrats on the score. No hurry to use them I am sure, they will be there long after you and I are gone.

 

On 1/13/2018 at 12:07 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

I think I need counseling.

 

When you find a good counselor  let me get his/her number, I need the same help but with used tin. Something about the patina of rusted tin... I just buy it, knowing some day I will have a use for it or will make a use for it. Like right now I am looking for a camper trailer so I can build another shed to store it so I can use some more of the tin. So don't worry, I am sure you will find a use for the poles. For instance, when you get your pilots licensed and that little Cessna..... :lol:

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