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Hey, for a little while on Wednesday my thumb had two nails!  

 

Dang!  A toenailing job gone wrong.  The point of the nail was pushing out the other side but didn’t break the skin.  A 15 mile drive to the Indian Clinic took care of it.  Very sore right now but much better than yesterday.  Hurt the old ego too.

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Hey, for a little while on Wednesday my thumb had two nails!  

 

Dang!  A toenailing job gone wrong.  The point of the nail was pushing out the other side but didn’t break the skin.  A 15 mile drive to the Indian Clinic took care of it.  Very sore right now but much better than yesterday.  Hurt the old ego too.

 

 

 

 

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OUCH!  That had to hurt going both ways!  I feel for ya Joel!

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Oh crap, Joel!!! Please tell me it missed the bone. Care to tell us how it happened so maybe I won't do the same thing.

 

So you're putting the decking down and the Amish crew will come in and frame it up. Who's doing the Sheetrock?  How will the lower plywood walls be finished out? Is that going to be like a balcony at the top of stairs landing or?

 

Hope that thumb heals up ok with no complications. Up on your tetnus shots I take it

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Interesting thing, X-rays showed it through the bone just behind the joint.  But, the nail blocks a lot of the X-rays compared to bone and it wasn’t easy to see it clearly.  A post extraction X-ray did not show evidence of bone damage and the doc declared that it didn’t strike the bone.  I’m sure that is the case because today it is almost back to normal.

 

I sort of recreated the crime scene showing what I was doing when this happened.  Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

 

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6 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Interesting thing, X-rays showed it through the bone just behind the joint.  But, the nail blocks a lot of the X-rays compared to bone and it wasn’t easy to see it clearly.  A post extraction X-ray did not show evidence of bone damage and the doc declared that it didn’t strike the bone.  I’m sure that is the case because today it is almost back to normal.

 

I sort of recreated the crime scene showing what I was doing when this happened.  Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

 

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Ouch  :(

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43 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Basically it was an angle shot into a door header and the nail glanced away instead of going into the wood.  The lesson here is that unless it’s a direct shot, you’d better be extra careful and keep things out of the line of fire.

 

Here, I’m holding the header in place with the target hand.  Next, the nail gun is used at an angle.  The last pic is the actual scar created by the errant nail.

 

So the nail traveled a couple of feet before going into your thumb. I've shot like that a bunch of times. A nailgun is so big and cumbersome, I can understand exactly how it happened. Thanks for the "reenactment"  Joel. I am about to start on some more framing and will be doing a good bit of toenailing so will keep that thumb with two nails picture in my mind. Surprised but glad see it healing so fast and to hear that it didn't fracture the bone into splinters which would have certainly made matters much worse.

Man it's a shame some of that rough cut framing is going to get covered up.

 

Question. How are you attaching the sole plates of your walls to the concrete? I used adhesive along with flat cut concrete nails for some of mine then borrowed a Hilti gun for some.

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The base plates are attached using 1/2” anchor bolts approximately every 4ft.  I use a big heavy duty hammer drill and drill through plate and all of the concrete.  Then I hammer in the bolt with a nut and washer and tighten.

 

 

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Mr. Earl, Having poured a fair amount of Concrete for foundations in many types of buildings I prefer to use foundation bolts put in immediately after the pour is down. However that is a bit late fir your job. I as Joel recommend 1/2" sleeved insert style "Red Head" anchors every 4' along the wall length and 6" from any and all openings. I Do Not go along with drilling clear through the slab. This has in a very few cases caused cracking from the edge of the slab to the insert and beyond. If your sole plates are 2" nominal thickness (1 1/2 actual) I would recommend at least a 5" x 1/2" Red Head insert depending on slab thickness. Drill through the plate and into the slab 1/2" deeper than the anchor length, clean the holes of dust/debris, drive in the anchor and tighten er up. This is work I gar-untee you but you will have a safe long standing shop. Just my two coppers worth but based on experience. M     

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Mark’s comments made me see a need to clarify what I had said.  On the walls at the perimeter of my building, I have a thickened edge, 12” deep and 10” wide with three 1/2” rebar in there.  These anchors did not go all the way through but did go in about 5”.  The internal walls did penetrate through the 4” slab in order to minimize the possibility of cracking.  If you only drilled to say, 3-1/2” then the expansion of the anchor would be occurring in the top 2-1/2” and breakout is a possibility.

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Joel, no offense was meant by my comments. These are two different types of concrete slabs needing different types of anchors for their walls. I hope your hand is well on the mend from the nail gun accident. Been there done that also with an air stapler for putting lath on walls. Two great shops by the way, keep up the good work.  M 

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Oh that’s no problem Mark.  When I went back and read what I wrote I was really talking about an exception rather than a rule because I had my mind on these internal rooms.  They are holding very little load.  Several years ago I would hammer drill a 3/16” hole and stuff a couple bare copper wires in it and drive in a 16 penny nail.   Thing I like about that rotary hammer drill is that I have a hole in a fraction of a minute.  

 

Thanks for the well wishes, thumb was used a lot today and it’s pretty sore right now.

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Got a confession, I bought more power poles.  Just another deal I couldn’t pass up.  I got 31 never used Oregon Doug Fir poles that are 80 and 90 feet long - 2013 vintage.  The deal also included cleaning up a bunch of very sound poles that weren’t so new but large diameter.  

 

I probably have have enough to build two or three shops like my last one.  They are in far better shape than the ones I used.  I split them with a friend who wants to build a shop.  I have no plans for my half.

 

the pics show the long poles that were hauled in and the pile of poles we cut to 16’-4” in order to saw out full 16 ft.

 

I think I need counseling.

 

 

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On 1/13/2018 at 12:07 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Got a confession, I bought more power poles.  Just another deal I couldn’t pass up.  I got 31 never used Oregon Doug Fir poles that are 80 and 90 feet long - 2013 vintage.  The deal also included cleaning up a bunch of very sound poles that weren’t so new but large diameter.  

 

I probably have have enough to build two or three shops like my last one.  They are in far better shape than the ones I used.  I split them with a friend who wants to build a shop.  I have no plans for my half.

 

the pics show the long poles that were hauled in and the pile of poles we cut to 16’-4” in order to saw out full 16 ft

 

80 and 90 feet long NEW DOUGLAS FIR "treated" poles!!!!! And delivered I am betting or hoping?!?!   I love Douglas Fir period!  Congrats on the score. No hurry to use them I am sure, they will be there long after you and I are gone.

 

On 1/13/2018 at 12:07 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

I think I need counseling.

 

When you find a good counselor  let me get his/her number, I need the same help but with used tin. Something about the patina of rusted tin... I just buy it, knowing some day I will have a use for it or will make a use for it. Like right now I am looking for a camper trailer so I can build another shed to store it so I can use some more of the tin. So don't worry, I am sure you will find a use for the poles. For instance, when you get your pilots licensed and that little Cessna..... :lol:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mentioned earlier I’m doing what I can to prepare for the Amish crew returning for a few days to do some internal framing and ceiling sheet metal work.  The ceilings in my internal rooms will be white sheet metal (low-rib R panel).  I will also use some of this same metal in my paint booth.  It won’t be the most interesting ceiling but it will work.

 

The longest metal is 24’-9”  and so how do you haul that on a 16 ft trailer?  I built a 2x6 frame using 20 ft lumber and nailed it to the trailer floor.  Tie a red flag on the end and it’s good for the 80 mile round trip.

 

 

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The paint booth will be a downdraft operation utilizing two, 24” wide rows of filters in the ceiling and the air being pulled through the booth using a 5 hp centrifugal blower located outside the building.  The 8” suction pipe is located in a floor basin that also doubles as a drain.  I’ll show this in more detail later.  This room will be tight  for dust management and can also be used as a car washing area as the floor in there slopes 2” to the floor drain.

 

 I’m framing up for the eight 24”x48” T5  6-bulb fluorescent light fixtures.  There will be clear plastic (a diffuser), silicone sealed cover over each light to seal out vapors and dust.

 

Most of the walls and ceiling will be the white low rib sheet metal but there will also be quite a bit of flat metal, especially around the lights.  The entry doors will be a challenge; I haven’t got all that figured out yet.

 

 

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23 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

The longest metal is 24’-9”  and so how do you haul that on a 16 ft trailer?  I built a 2x6 frame using 20 ft lumber and nailed it to the trailer floor.  Tie a red flag on the end and it’s good for the 80 mile round trip.

 

Been there, done that! Almost.  I think my longest sheets were 24'. All I did was to nail some 16' 2x8's together in an L shape then screwed the horizontal 2x8's to the floor of the trailer 3' apart, leaving a 6 ft overhang so the tin actually hung 2 ft over the ends of the "rails" . Did you experience any tail wagging? I DID.  :wacko:

 

Man you're doing it all up right. And MOVING along!!  Can't wait to see what the Amish crew gets done.

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11 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 Guess I am just consumin!  I can figure how to reassemble almost anything.  Creative? Nope.

 

  Ben

 

Said by the same guy who did some unbelievable "creative" mods to a straight eight.

 

 

Who do you think you think you're kidding brother Ben?

 

 

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I’ve been on this forum for many years and can attest that there are many talented people here and most of them with far more guts and raw experience than I.   I’ve learned to lean on those folks for priceless advice along this Buick journey.

 

The paint booth lights are in and wired.  I’m just about ready for the wall and ceiling metal.  It’s very bright already but once the white walls and ceiling are in you might get a sunburn in there.  I mentioned that this is a downdraft booth.  You can see the floor pit where the air will leave.  There will be two rows of filters in the ceiling.   I will likely put a filter over the grating on the pit to keep from painting up my blower and piping. 

 

There is a lot of caulking up there in those joists.  I’m trying to ensure that the final filters will only see air that goes through the prefilter. It will be easy to change the prefilter; not so for the final filters.

 

I need this booth working now.  Ive got a backlog of all kinds of parts and bodies needing primer and paint.

 

Just noticed I can’t post my pics.  I’ll try again.  Looks like I got one to load.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yes, this is something that I planned from the start.  I wanted paint booth that I could also use as a wash room.  The drain that you see on the floor has an 8” pipe in there.  I placed a vertical Tee in this drain line and at the end of the drain pipe is a removable cap.  The vertical pipe outside the building will connect into the suction of a 5hp centrifugal blower.  When the blower is in use, the drain pipe must be capped.  For any water to drain, the cap must be off.

 

I’ll do a better job of explaining this.  There’s a picture that’s worth a thousand words, I just need the picture.  Here is a picture of the slab and pipe.

 

 

 

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I have a couple more pics of the paint booth.  There’s a lot of work left but I’m hoping that I’ll get some help very soon with it and several other tasks that would be near impossible for me to go solo.

 

I've also included a rough sketch of how the air flow will work.  In the ceiling there will be two 24” wide rows of filters that run the length of the booth.

 

I thought I’d turn off all other lights and take a pic of the lighted booth.  That’s just over 200,000 lumens.  I got a good tan just sweeping the room.  Ok, maybe I’m stretching it a bit.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

This past Thursday I drove out to Henry’s farm to tell him that I was ready for at least three days work.  Henry is the Amish crew leader and he apparently has access to a phone but unreachable by phone if that makes sense.  Henry was out on a job but I left word with his wife.  Really no telling at this point when he’ll show up but I’m sure he will.

 

To get the most efficient work from this crew, you need to have all things ready for them; supplies, work list, special instructions, clean workspace, power, compressed air, etc.  They, like anyone else, are willing to wait around while you make up your mind or go to the store for more supplies.  You also have to do all the things that Henry won’t like plumbing and electrical.

 

I’m anxious to see a big change around here so I hope he comes soon.

 

Lamar, I chose to buy used lights, 2’x4’ fixtures each with 6 T5 bulbs.  On a per lumen basis I got these for about 1/6th the cost of LED.  I now have 32 fixtures in the main shop.  I hung them myself using the three tier scaffold.  Not too big of a problem; I screwed wood to each fixtures first and then set the wood across the bottom chord of the trusses.  Others just mounted to the purlins.  The lights are very bright but they spin the meter fast at 2.7 amps each.

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I did a rough restoration on this coke machine many years ago for a friend who used it for his homebrews. He later gave it to me and it has found a place in the shop.  

 

It’s a 14 holer, 1959 model and works great.  I doubt that I’ll keep it under the stairs but probably not far from there.

 

 

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On 2/12/2018 at 9:01 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

I did a rough restoration on this coke machine many years ago for a friend who used it for his homebrews. He later gave it to me and it has found a place in the shop.  

 

It’s a 14 holer, 1959 model and works great.  I doubt that I’ll keep it under the stairs but probably not far from there.

 

 

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Cool machine! 

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Hi Bill, I remember meeting you in Fredericksburg probably now nearly 6 years ago.  Lamar was there picking up his maroon ‘54.   I drove my ‘60 Electra.

 

That pop machine is set up to sell you a beer for just 20 cents!  I think I can adjust that but not sure how.  I checked the temp just yesterday and it was 34F.  

 

Next, I want to get one of those old popcorn machines.   

 

Take Care,

Joel

 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Hi Bill, I remember meeting you in Fredericksburg probably now nearly 6 years ago.  Lamar was there picking up his maroon ‘54.   I drove my ‘60 Electra.

 

That pop machine is set up to sell you a beer for just 20 cents!  I think I can adjust that but not sure how.  I checked the temp just yesterday and it was 34F.  

 

Next, I want to get one of those old popcorn machines.   

 

Take Care,

Joel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Joel,

I am bad as I remember your car but not the face.  Maybe you can come down this fall for a tour of the Hill Country. It will be based out of Kerrville Tx.  It would be great to see another 1960 Buick.

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On ‎1‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 10:31 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

 

 

The longest metal is 24’-9”  and so how do you haul that on a 16 ft trailer?  I built a 2x6 frame using 20 ft lumber and nailed it to the trailer floor.  Tie a red flag on the end and it’s good for the 80 mile round trip.

 

 

I love it!  When people ask me how long my trailer is, I tell them 5 ft wide by however long I need it to be :lol:

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By far, the bulk of this trailer load of metal was 13ft more or less.  And, the folks at the metal place stacked it heavy on one end, I’m sure anticipating this situation.  I’ve had the tail wagging the dog before on loads like that and it’s dangerous.  This was a smooth pull.

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Final day for the Amish crew.  Their progress was good and I now have a lot of work ahead for myself.  

 

This plywood enclosure within my shop looks like it was hit with the ugly stick.  It needs lots of trim and character. 

 

A few more pics. The last pic is a room 13’ x 13’ that will become a small theater room for 12 year old boy and his friends.  

 

The first pic is my mechanic’s room which is about 25’ x 19’ and will be climate controlled. 

 

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On 2/21/2018 at 7:17 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Seeing a lot of progress in a short time is motivating to me.

 

         "  "  " "  " "  "  "  "  "   "  "  "  "  "  "  "  "  "  "  "  " depressing the hell out of me.

 

Good lord man, send them guys down to Georgia. I just sold some parts so could maybe keep them on the payroll for an hour or two... :lol: 

 

Looking good Joel. Can't wait to see how you dress up some of that plywood.  Gotta wonder how much more of that walnut you got cut up and stashed.

Just curious, what kind of aroma is about the building with all that fir in there.

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