Jump to content

1972 Buick Riviera 455 oil pressure light comes on after engine is started (idling range RPMs), combined with a suspected fuel pump failure - related?


Recommended Posts

Hey all ... I'm new here and I believe I'm in the right place ... this based on my Google search of '1972 Buick Riviera 455 oil pressure light switch' and the at least 5 threads here that have dealt with the 455 o.p. switch issue ... my understanding is that the switch activates the idiot light at or below about 8 psi of oil pressure.

 

Several threads here point to o.p. switch failures that are not really o.p. problems, per se.  This car (it was my Dad's) has been sitting in my garage for 24 years ... it doesn't get out much.  So, age-related failures are likely inevitable but an o.p. problem out of the blue seems quite unlikely.  The dipstick shows the engine is Full of nice clean oil and the engine, when it does run (on the introduced-by-me gasoline at the primaries of the Rochester QuadraJet carburetor, necessary due to a deteriorating, now suspected as completely failed, mechanical fuel pump), has yet to make any kind of unusual mechanical noise(s), which you might expect if there were indeed no o.p.  Regardless, I'll err on the side of caution and not attempt to run the engine again 'til I've resolved the o.p. idiot light issue to my satisfaction (it would be ideal to temporarily install a liquid-filled pressure gauge to verify actual o.p., however, I don't own one, and am, as yet, unclear on where exactly I could introduce it).

 

After reading through most of the o.p. sw. threads found here, I believe I've identified the o.p. sw. location (top of intake manifold, Fwd., RH side, with a single connector using a green wire - see pics, attached), however, I initially expected to find the o.p. sw. installed into the block, or, the RH cylinder head - can anyone confirm I've found the o.p. sw. please?

 

I'll need a few other key pieces of information ... hopefully certain folks here know these '72 455s thoroughly and will offer me a few pointers.

 

I need to identify the float bowl vent (should only be 1 of 2 possibilities on my carb - see pics, attached) so I can fill the float bowl properly instead of just dousing the primary carb bores with liquid gasoline and risk washing down the cylinder bores further ... it seems there are quite a few variations on these f.b. vents, depending on charcoal cannister (which I believe I have) usage and the like.

 

Also, I've got it in my head that GM engine oil pumps are driven by the bottom of the distributor shaft, so, a fuel pump failure in direct conjunction with a potential low or no o.p. issue does not seem possible to me ... just a coincidence - right? ... however, I also do know the various GM divisions did build their own engine designs up to a certain point in time, so, does the circa '72 Buick 455 engine possibly use some radically different method of driving the oil pump?  Like from something to do with the fuel pump?

 

I will need to source the o.p. sw. and fuel pump ... originality on this car is important to me - any thoughts on the best lower 48 suppliers of OEM and / or NOS parts?

 

And, If there's a good tutorial out there on changing the mechanical fuel pump as painlessly as possible (I believe some of the older Chevrolet V-8 blocks have a plug in the block just below where the f.p. mounts ... once the plug is removed, a rod can be extracted to allow easier re & re of the f.p. w/o fighting diaphram spring tension), please be so kind as to point me to it ... meanwhile, I'll search YouTube for something specifically relevant to the re & re of the '72 Buick 455 fuel pump.

 

Thanks all, FFF

20220728_151013 (28''x21'').jpg

20220728_151000 (28''x21'').jpg

20220728_150946 (28''x21'').jpg

20220728_150931 (28''x21'').jpg

Edited by Frankenstien (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suspect that both possible failures are "age related" rather than not.  Not really uncommon for the fuel pump diaphram to fail when they have been exposed to ethanol'd fuels AND then dry out from lack of fuel on them . . . from what I have read.

 

The tube with the "slice" on the front of the choke plate housing (primary venturis) is directly over the float bowl, so you can use it to fill the bowl with a small funnel.  The float bow volume on Quadrajets is rather small in comparison to other 4bbl carbs, so not much will be needed.

 

For genreral purposes, get a new fuel pump so you'll know it is new and in good shape.  Also replace ALL of the rubber fuel lines from the tank forward with new rubber ethanol-tolerant fuel lines. 

 

A quick Google search for "1972 Buick 455 oil pressure sensor" indicates that sending unit is on the lower rh front of the block, near the oil pan rail.  Plus the sensor you pictured is the temperature sending unit.  Plictures of the oil pressure sender, too.

 

Hope this might help,

NTX5467

Edited by NTX5467 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The oil pressure switch is located on the oil pump near the oil filter.  Check the oil level again, feel the oil with your fingers and smell the dipstick.  Does the oil feel particularly thin and smell like gasoline?  It's possible for a failed fuel pump to leak gasoline into the crankcase.  If the engine is run with adulterated oil it's possible to have low pressure and damage will occur if it is operated that way long enough.

 

If the pump is suspect, i suggest replacing it and then changing the oil.  Buy a cheap mechanical oil pressure gauge and install it in place of the oil pressure sending unit.  Run the engine and observe the pressure readings both hot and cold.  If you have at least 10 psi at hot idle it should be OK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Low oil pressure at idle was a problem with GM cars of the early 1970's. In the mid 1970's I remember rumors of an oil pressure switch that was set for about 3 PSIG when more emission controls made engines hotter.

 

If that 24 year storage was dead storage you could have a small amount of bearing surface loss giving some extra clearance. That happens when a car is parked with dirty oil that contains acid from combustion byproducts. It will etch the bearing surface over time and the oxidized material will be wiped away on the first start up. It can be as much as half a thousandth. If the engine was not worn much when parked and measuring the oil pressure with a gauge looks OK you can live with it.

 

There are enough precautions to take with a long term stored car that I have often thought about writing a book on recommissioning them, at least a long article.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can not say my 73 Estate with the 455 suffered a flicking oil light. This motor had over 100K and the timing chain was stretched like a rubber band.  I ran the heck out of it.  Took it to the drag strip.  Why not.  It is about consistent times through the trap for the win.     If I remember correctly the oil ps is by the oil pump/filter.  If you do find a oil pressure gauge use the oil ps port as access for the gauge. 

  

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not much for the idea of continuously monitoring my engine with gauges. I know what can fail suddenly while driving and I take steps to avoid that. Installing a test gauge and verifying should be enough.

1751050611_034mna(2).jpg.580a2163dabd4fa03ccd72b45a5a954c.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Here I am Saturday morning catching up on all the Replies to my initial post (I assumed I would get an automatic e-mail notification with any Replies - I did not ... so I just fixed that up in my Notifications Settings here) ...

 

 ... thanks to NTX5467, EmTee, 60FlatTop & avgwarhawk for stepping up and helping me out.

 

OK, so, the info & insights provided are all good food for thought ... in their absence 'til just now, this morning before getting up, I thought through a plan to verify a couple of things for myself ... with the ignition turned on, I was going to remove the single, green wire connector from what NTX5467 has now identified for me as the temperature switch to see what effect it would have ... I now suspect the 'HOT' idiot light would have gone out.  My other thought was to use my Chevy Tahoe to pull the Riv out of my garage enough to allow access at the front, then lift it and inspect for the oil pressure switch location, fuel pump physical access from below, as well as any possible external evidence of f.p. failure (i.e. leaking [nothing on garage floor that I could see before] or a fractured casting? ... I've seen GM f.p.'s that literally exploded ... based solely on diaphram spring pressure and a faulty? casting ... if that's even what's under there).  I'm also considering scabbing in an electric fuel pump until such time as I can source the correct mechanical fuel pump, which, at this early juncture, already seems to be a problem (see below).  I need to be able to run the Riv enough to get it up my driveway and out on the street ... the Riv is the lynch pin to my 4-bay garage and is keeping a trailered boat, two m/c's and an old Beemer all cooped up 'til it moves.

 

So, the more pressing challenge will be sourcing the parts ... my local auto house, Lordco, can only offer me a 'Spectra' (chinese-made) f.p. and don't have / can't get the o.p. sw.

 

Yesterday, I called an old friend in the parts dept. of a local GM dealership and he researched out all the various part numbers for me for both items but could no longer get the parts through GM.

 

Any thoughts from you folks on OEM or NOS GM parts would be most welcome ... meanwhile, I'll start plugging in to Google and PartsVoice.com the #'s provided by my GM parts guy, which were:

 

Fuel Pump:

GM 6470634
FYI, per my GM parts guy - 3 lines: 2 out, 1 in
AC 40927

NAPA #? --> suggested as a possibility by my GM parts guy ... I'll look for this myself, next --> so, in Canada, theoretically (I did not pursue this # on the phone with the local NAPA guy), I can get NAPA FPN B0180P from UAP NAPA

 

... in the U.S. (there is a NAPA branch store in Blaine, WA [41 minutes South of me, just across the Canada / U.S. border], closed today, opens 8 a.m. Monday, 01AUG22), FUP B0180P shows available come Tuesday, 02AUG22 ... interestingly, only the napaonline.com site calls this pump '- OE' ...


DELPHI #? --> suggested as a possibility by my GM parts guy ... I'll look for this myself, next --> so, in Canada, per the local NAPA guy, there is no stock of Delphi DFP MF0086 (referred to as '- OE') from UAP NAPA

 

... in the U.S., DFP MF0086 (referred to as '- OE') shows 'Out of Stock' at napaonline.com

Oil Pressure Switch
 ... made by Borg Warner, per my GM parts guy
GM 1370748 (installs into the "cylinder block" per my GM parts guy)
AC 'D1805'

GM 1619641
 ... replaced previous GM part # , per my GM parts friend

 

NAPA #'s? --> possibilities I've looked for myself --> so, in Canada, I can get 'NAPA Engine Management' (Echlin) UNI OP6090, by Friday, 05AUG22, or, 'NAPA Mileage Plus Ignition' MPI OP6090SB, theoretically (I did not pursue this # on the phone with the local NAPA guy) from UAP NAPA

 

... in the U.S., ECH OP6090 shows available come Tuesday, 02AUG22, and, MPE OP6090SB shows 'Unavailable' but can be ordered online ...

 

 

So, that's where I'm at with this, for now.

 

FFF

 

BTW, 60FlatTop, I wholeheartedly encourage you to pursue your thought on:

On 7/29/2022 at 7:55 AM, 60FlatTop said:

There are enough precautions to take with a long term stored car that I have often thought about writing a book on recommissioning them, at least a long article.

 ... this has been a subject of some interest to me of late, as I watch on YT what others do in the way of preparations as they resurrect long-dead engines, ect. ... one particularly entertaining young fellow is CorvetteBen ... he has chosen to focus on C3's and has taught me a lot about them ... I would like to satisfy a long held ambition to own & drive a '73 C3 coupe ... and get that itch out of my system before I kick ...

Edited by Frankenstien
updated NAPA part # info, links & availability (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 ... separate follow-up post ... when I just now tried to online-order the two bold-face font part #'s above, napaonline.com put the hook in me to save 20% by ordering 3+ items ... so ...

... does anyone know the sizes of the 3 fittings on the fuel pump? ... image.png.f63c83ae97c8f1c66cd164d14c674aae.png

 

 ... one is a female threaded pipe connection (the old, original fuel pipe that connects to the f. pump should be OK ... as long as it cooperates and disassembles cleanly), the other two are what clearly appear to be two different size hose nipples ... if I can determine the fuel hose I.D. sizes, I could simultaneously order some bulk fuel hose, save some loot and worry about quantities during the online order process, or, preferably even later ... perhaps once in-store (don't they typically just cut lengths required from bulk hose reels?).

 

Thanks, FFF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 ... was just on the rockauto.com site NTX5467 ... thanks for that ... looks promising (I like the interface) ... however, if I can get parts Tuesday from NAPA in Blaine, WA, that would be preferable to waiting, I'm just guessing now, a week or so for UPS Ground from NY to 98281 ... I'll still suss it out mind you ... as I have yet to pull the trigger on the U.S. NAPA online ordering site until I figure out the f.p. hose nipple O.D.'s so I can order fuel hose at the same time ...

 

FFF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are lucky NAPA offered you three parts that fit your car. I looked at front wheel bearings for my Avalanche earlier today and they thought I might also want a rear axle bearing for a Honda Prelude and a front wheel bearing for a Lexus 300.

 

NAPA programmers must have a little ball.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 ... took a look under lifted car today (see pics, attached ... she's a dirty bird under there ... the fresher-looking gooey stuff running down the block surfaces adjacent to the fuel pump (i.e. down the metal fuel line, f. p. outlet to front, center inlet of carb) almost looks to me like leaking gasoline residue (varnishy-looking brownish crap that was evidently nearly fully liquified when it leaked down the metal fuel line) ... although, there's so much caked on oil / grease under there that it's hard to tell ... looks like original flexible fuel hose segments (still not sure what I.D. sizes they are exactly ... maybe RockAuto spells it out in their various f. p. options matrices ... lots of rabbit holes to go down there) at f. p. and GM's shitty little spring clamps ... also, it would appear someone already replaced the oil pressure switch at least once ... note the introduced wire segment w. different connectors to convert from 1/4" flat blade terminal to round stud-style, push-on terminal at the replacement o. p. switch ...

 

I'll have to post additional pics in subsequent thread Replies ... FFF

20220730_182841 (21''x28'').jpg

20220730_182710 (21''x28'').jpg

20220730_182625 (21''x28'').jpg

20220730_182614 (21''x28'').jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there's part of your problem.  It's orange with part number PH25 in your last picture.    You will probably need to pull the oil pump and have it re-conditioned or at least a new thrust plate.  The oiling system is the weakest link in the big block Buick.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Judging by the engine paint overspray, the fuel pump and its hoses appear to be original to the car.  How many miles on the odometer?

 

When you change the oil, replace the filter with one from NAPA (Wix).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like those OEM fuel line clamps are still doing their job decades later.  What is more concern is the cracking of the rubber fuel lines near the clamps . . . from age.  Those lines need to be replaced as they were not designed to be used with fuels with the higher ethanol content of our modern E10+ fuels.  Sizes??  IF you might carefully wipe off the accumulation of dust and dirt, the hose numbers and size should be ink-stamped on them.  Usually, either 5/16" or 3/8", which are common fuel line sizes.  Get "the good stuff" for them, usually from Gates Green Stripe (or similar).

 

New OEM style hose clamps can be obtained from many restoration parts sources.  I know, many prefer the worm-drive hose clamps, BUT they also usually position the clamps incorrectly and apply too much torque to them, by observation.

 

AFTER you get the new fuel pump and oil pressure sender installed, that poor thing needs a good bath.  All of that accumulation of oil-related gunk serves as insulation to the engine block, which means the only cooling it can receive is via the coolant rather than also  convection cooling of the block by ambient air, when stopped.  Although it does preserve the paint under it.

 

Hopefully, the wiring repair for the replaced oil pressure sender can be returned to OEM configuration and specs.

 

Might as well also CAREFULLY change the fuel filter at the carb inlet, too.  "Carefully" so as to not crack the casting the fuel line is attached to.

 

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 ... thanks guys ... all good thoughts ... and here I've been getting FRAM stuff from Lordco for donkey's years ... Brad, I've never heard FRAM criticized quite that bluntly ... good to know ... can that oil pump be serviced w/o pulling the oil pan?  I doubt it ... not an item on the current agenda ... I'll see where we end up after I've thrown a gauge on there for testing and then changed the o.p. sw. ... EmTee, I've got WIX stuff & Baldwin stuff on my 6-71N's equipped Uniflite boat ... NAPA has kind of withdrawn from my local market here in Canada ... closest to me now is Richmond, B.C. and I'm out in Tsawwassen ... they left here many years ago and recently abdicated from nearby Ladner as well ... local company Lordco has them back on their heels here ...

And, the old girl has 76,187.5 miles (25NOV21) on the odo ... and hasn't been more than 10' in and out of the garage on a couple of occasions since ...

NTX5467, thank you for all the info ... yes, those clamps are right where some Buick assembler put them ... I've never bothered buying a pair of pliers specifically for that style of clamp ... regular pliers will often work, even in awkward spots (like on the f. p.), however, I usually curse at least once when dealing with them ... for my $, all-SS worm-drive hose clamps will get used with new flexible fuel hose segments at the f. p. (I'll hang on to the old clamps for originality considerations) ... thanks for the brand recommendation ... I coulda', shoulda', didn't clean off or remove the hoses yesterday in order to obtain the sizing info as I couldn't find my jack stands (initially - got 'em now, FYI - my garage situation is tight to the point where the Riv has to be moved back 10' up a bit of an incline [see pics - and, yes, I do have the 'R' wheel center caps!] in order to do anything ... then, end of day, it has to go back in so I can lock up) and didn't want to venture under the car too much ... the 'bath' will have to wait 'til I get the car somewhere with a full lift and the equipment to do the job effectively ... the o. p. sw. installer did not hack the original wiring connector, so, that should be easily restorable ... I'll be careful with the metal fuel line (and large hex float bowl nut/cover? yes?) disconnects at the carb inlet (I've seen a QJet stopped by an accumulation of debris in that filter cavity ... from a new custom built aluminum fuel tank installed during restoration of my Donzi copy lake boat ... evidently there's no sock or strainer, just a pick-up tube in the tank), will replace the filter found there as well as the metal gasket typically used behind the large hex float bowl nut/cover ... FFF

 

20220730_181441 (28''x21'').jpg

20220730_181431 (28''x21'').jpg

 

 

 

 

20220730_180035 (28''x21'', n.p.#).jpg

20220730_180025 (28''x21'', n.p.#).jpg

Edited by Frankenstien
edited photos (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/31/2022 at 1:20 AM, Frankenstien said:

 and GM's shitty little spring clamps

 

Actually they are called prevailing tension hose clamps.  The are designed to continuously apply tension/pressure to the hose so as the hose  ages it will still have pressure to seal. As NTX5467 said, the worm drive clamps stop putting tension on the hose when the screw driver is removed.  The prevailing tension hose clamps when properly matched to the hose, ect.. they are far superior for long term sealing.

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please do NOT crawl under that car when only only supported by a jack.  ALWAYS put jack stands under the frame before you get under the car.  We want you to live to enjoy that nice looking boat-tail!  ;)

 

1735250208_20220730_180025(28x21n.p.).jp

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Larry ... I have been duly schooled ... thank you ... however, I'm still going to use SS hose clamps and keep those p.t.h.c.'s in a box ... 

 

EmTee ... I hear you ... and thanks for the well-wishes as to me not getting to know the old girl too, too well ...

 

On 7/31/2022 at 11:11 PM, Frankenstien said:

 ... awesome ... thanks Brad ... I did not know the o. p. was that well designed ...

 

FFF

 ... upon re-reading my own Reply ... well designed ... in that the oil pump can be serviced w/o dropping the oil pan ... maybe not as much so in terms of the pump's actual durability ...

 

RockAuto parts arr. Thurs. ... got a DELPHI MF0086 f.p., an SMP PS57 o.p. sw. (they had ACDELCO D1805, however, they're 'Wholesaler closeout' inventory, sound like potentially old stock to me and came from a diff. R.A. w-house, meaning 2 shipments to my U.S. mail drop instead of 1 ... adding expense in an additional p/u fee and increasing the odds of parts arriving diff. days ... not good given lingering border crossing issues post?-pandemic and get 'er done efficiency consid.'s) and a WIX 51258 o.f. ...

 

FFF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer to use the original style Corbin hose clamps on my cars. BUT I have found they are usually loose on new replacement hoses. The country of manufacture for hoses, which ain't America, converts from MM to fractional inch for labeling and the hose OD is actually a bit smaller. It is a nominal sizing.

 

I don't car for the small worm gear clamps because of their appearance and that they tend to apply pressure unevenly around the hose, unlike the concentric Corbin clamp grip. Luckily I have a good supply of older American made hose kept in a dark metal box that appears flexible and well preserved.

 

Life is not always easy among the fuel linologists.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As good as the Corbin or similar clamps might have been, in the 1960s, they were considered "inexpensive and quick to install" with allegedly poor durablity over time.  So everybody had the stainless steel worm drive clamps in a large selection of sizes.  "The best way to go".  And back then I concurred with that, too.  Never did like the "Tower Clamps" that GM used, though.

 

Although there was a special pair of pliers for the Corbin clamps, a normal pair of pliers could be made to work well, from my experiences.  As most hoses had some sort of bump for the hose to slide over, that meant the hose was not seeking to go "somewhere", so less than max clamping force was needed to seal it and keep it in position.  Evidenced by many cars with close to 100K miles on them and they still had their OEM clamps on the hoses, which were not leaking.  So, "their age" was the reason they got replaced by the SSWD clamps, by observation.

 

When I'd buy a new carb, I'd always keep the extra clamps and such which came with them.  Keeping them for "future use".

 

Just some thoughts and observations,

NTX5467

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 ... thanks NTX5467 for your thoughts on clamps ... I myself am a commercial salt water boat driver ('Captain' to my Deckhands), so, the use of stainless steel stuff is kind of a no-brainer for me ... on or in anything ... I absolutely hate coming across corroded ferrous fasteners, clamp components and the like ... manufacturers will typically cheap out and use ferrous stuff ... I get it ... cost per unit ... but it's still irritating to have to deal with ...

 ... anyways, I have a little mystery I'm hoping those here who are helping me out can maybe solve ... based on their own experience and / or knowing of appropriate resources I can access and review myself ...

 ... there is a relatively short piece of larger I.D. vacuum hose attached at one end to what I'm pretty sure is the cruise control vacuum diaphram unit ... installed above the LR end of the intake manifold ... the other end is attached to nothing and is just pointing upwards ... loose as a goose ... there is no hose nipple at the rear of the carb, or in that vicinity of the intake manifold (or the rear area of the air cleaner, although, I'm pretty sure that c.c.? device wants an active vacuum source to function) to accomodate it ... so, until I figure out what it is, what it does and where it's supposed to go, I've temporarily plugged it to keep debris out of it ... I have noted a newer-looking run of similar size hose that attaches to the center rear of the top of the intake manifold via a newer-looking PCV? metal device (see pics, attached) ... any thoughts on what's transpired here?

Thanks, FFF

20220802_082202.jpg

20220802_082251.jpg

Edited by Frankenstien
clarity (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The GM/Delco factory cruise system is a multi-part system.  There is the transducer which the speedo cables attach to (one into to the transducer and the other one goes to the speedo head).  The transducer has two vac nipples on it, seems like they are very similar in size, but not the same.  One vac line then goes to the servo, which actuates the throttle on the carb attachment.  There is also a brake switch in the vac system, too, which is activated by the brake pedal.  So, vac goes to the brake switch, then to the transducer, and then to the servo.  When the brake switch cuts the vac to the transducer, the system disables.  In earlier units, the brake switch is a separate item, but in the 1980s era, the brake switch was a part of the brake light switch mechanism. 

 

Possibly a diagnostic schematic in either the Buick Chassis Service Manual?  Or an illustration of the complete system in the Buick Parts Manual.

 

NTX5467

Edited by NTX5467 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

NTX5467 ... thanks for the description of 'Cruise Master' cruise control ... I found an online reference to the Buick Chassis Service Manual at TeamBuick ... excellent resource ... however, I am, so far, stymied in my online searches by profiteers ... as far as the Buick Parts Manual is concerned, or, any illustration excerpts from same ... which is what I'm really after.

Any thoughts on finding an online reference to the latter?

 

And, after thinking about this stray vacuum hose some more, I remembered that my Dad had a(n RV?) shop install vacuum (/ electric) (?) brakes on this car (there is a larger removable round plug in a matching receiver with a relatively large I.D. hose attached to it (you can see it in my earlier photo attachment above) ... all adjacent to the 2" draw bar receiver hitch .. for which the old boy had a 2 5/16" ball hitch draw bar and weight distribution bars [installed under chain tension]) for the purpose of hauling a larger (28?') Airstream trailer from Arizona out to Florida and back one snowbird season ... my money is on said shop needed a vacuum source and may have asked my Dad if he really needed cruise control, which, knowing him, he would have told them he didn't use or need it, so, the shop may have disabled the C.M. cruise control in order to obtain their vac. src. ... I'll look to see if they took the precaution of disabling C.M. electrically ... by pulling any related fuse(s) ... that is, if, in fact, I've surmised what's transpired correctly.

 

Thanks, FFF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My preference of Corbin, worm gear or those spring steel wire types is what is easiest to install  at the time. 🤔

 

Another warning. Do not use the incandescent drop light when working on fuel systems. A Northern Virginia (Rosenthal Chevrolet, Arlington) dealership's service area burned back in the late 90s because a drop of fuel broke the lamp and more fuel was on the floor. Oops.😲 And many more stories of similar with corresponding personal injury (and burns are painful). Enclosed lamps better. 

 

On a better note, great looking boat tail!👍

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Frank DuVal said:

Another warning. Do not use the incandescent drop light when working on fuel systems.

Frank DuVal ... very appropo advice that I had not thought of myself ... thank you for that one ... in my case, an uncontrolled fire would not only take out my Dad's boat tail, it could conceivably take out all my other vehicles in the garage, and, as my garage is directly below / integral to my home, things could get severely nasty ... 

 

Thanks for the compliment on the car ... my Dad had two boat tails and was always showing me brochures for the latest new Rivs ... he often talked about buying a new one, however, his depression-era upbringing and resulting save-up-for-a-rainy-day mindset would not allow him that extravagance or to indulge that aspiration.

 

FFF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are the various items related to the Cruise Master's infrastructure on the car?  As in turn signal stalk with the "Apply" button on the end?  The only real difference in the factory cruise units back then was that some had an indicator light on the instrument panel to indicate the system was activated.  Seems like Oldsmobiles ahd that light and On-Off Switch?  For others, when the ignition was on and the engine was runniing, the system was "on".

 

The www.wildaboutcarsonline.com website has some vintage Buick parts books archived online.  In segments.  Might be an illustration of the factory cruise system in there, too?  Other stuff in there, too!

 

NTX5467

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, NTX5467 said:

...some had an indicator light on the instrument panel to indicate the system was activated.

My '67 has a 'Cruise' indicator light on the dash, but my car doesn't have cruise control.  The light is not functional, but under the right lighting conditions one can read the lens looking at the dash panel.  I'd expect the '71 to be similar, though an aftermarket system likely wouldn't use the factory dash indicator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...