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Two bolts in the engine head are leaking cooling liquid. How can I repair


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Not much information to go on. If head and block contact surfaces are good (clean, flat, and match (same engine parts)) and head gasket is new (or at least in good condition), and head bolts are torqued down correctly (in sequence and to correct torque spec), then water should never escape cooling channels in the first place. If water is coming up around a couple of bolts, my first question is where is water coming from? Sounds to me like gasket is not doing it's job. My first effort would be to check torque on those bolts/nuts. Consult manual/recommendations, bring engine to operating temp, shut off and re-torque (careful not to over-torque). Since OP does not mention engine being worked on, make, flathead of OHV, 6 or 8 cyl etc, advice is limited to generic stuff. When I first reassembled my '31 Chrysler 8 cyl engine, I had several leaks up thru bolts. When I disassembled for a close look, I realized the new head gasket I bought was for 1931 Chrysler, but not correct for my engine. Chrysler had changed cooling hole pattern early in the production when they went from 3" to 3.125" and later 3.25" pistons, and as a result I had the early engine and a later gasket.  Gasket fit bolt pattern, piston openings and valve pattern perfectly, but holes in gasket did not align with holes in block/head near 7/8 pistons. I relate this story just to demonstrate leaking problem can be due to many issues. I ordered a proper gasket from Olsens (they up to that point were not aware of the variations but luckily I had correct part# and they had a NOS one to match after I sent them this photo) (note many extra coolant holes at left end of lower gasket).(I understand the early engines had over-heating problems as coolant had trouble getting all the way from radiator to and around 6/7/8 pistons).  IMG_5520.JPG.2519cfb56e11270f5e1a4fbc1d024c16.JPG.

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Two bolts in the engine head are leaking cooling liquid. How can I repair

You can also remove the head bolts, after draining the coolant. Replace the bolts with studs rated for your application. Apply sealant to studs and install. Let sealant cure/dry before filling with coolant and tightening down new head studs. Most old head bolts will have a lot of corrosion on them. Compromising the threads from sealing.

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On 7/16/2022 at 6:07 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

You can also remove the head bolts, after draining the coolant. Replace the bolts with studs rated for your application. Apply sealant to studs and install. Let sealant cure/dry before filling with coolant and tightening down new head studs. Most old head bolts will have a lot of corrosion on them. Compromising the threads from sealing.

Thanks sir

It's always good to hear somebody else to hear different views about a problem

I have also thoughts in that way

Enjoy living

 

Herman 

 

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On 7/16/2022 at 6:07 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

You can also remove the head bolts, after draining the coolant. Replace the bolts with studs rated for your application. Apply sealant to studs and install. Let sealant cure/dry before filling with coolant and tightening down new head studs. Most old head bolts will have a lot of corrosion on them. Compromising the threads from sealing.

Okay, thanks

Yes I saw the bolts have a lot of corrosion

I thought also that's maybe the problem

But first I want the good people from aaca to hear what they thought

They have more experience !

Thanks 👍

Herman 

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On 7/16/2022 at 3:42 PM, Gunsmoke said:

Not much information to go on. If head and block contact surfaces are good (clean, flat, and match (same engine parts)) and head gasket is new (or at least in good condition), and head bolts are torqued down correctly (in sequence and to correct torque spec), then water should never escape cooling channels in the first place. If water is coming up around a couple of bolts, my first question is where is water coming from? Sounds to me like gasket is not doing it's job. My first effort would be to check torque on those bolts/nuts. Consult manual/recommendations, bring engine to operating temp, shut off and re-torque (careful not to over-torque). Since OP does not mention engine being worked on, make, flathead of OHV, 6 or 8 cyl etc, advice is limited to generic stuff. When I first reassembled my '31 Chrysler 8 cyl engine, I had several leaks up thru bolts. When I disassembled for a close look, I realized the new head gasket I bought was for 1931 Chrysler, but not correct for my engine. Chrysler had changed cooling hole pattern early in the production when they went from 3" to 3.125" and later 3.25" pistons, and as a result I had the early engine and a later gasket.  Gasket fit bolt pattern, piston openings and valve pattern perfectly, but holes in gasket did not align with holes in block/head near 7/8 pistons. I relate this story just to demonstrate leaking problem can be due to many issues. I ordered a proper gasket from Olsens (they up to that point were not aware of the variations but luckily I had correct part# and they had a NOS one to match after I sent them this photo) (note many extra coolant holes at left end of lower gasket).(I understand the early engines had over-heating problems as coolant had trouble getting all the way from radiator to and around 6/7/8 pistons).  IMG_5520.JPG.2519cfb56e11270f5e1a4fbc1d024c16.JPG.

Yes I think a have to replace the head gasket again

I asked first to The people who make the head correct

I bought already 22 new bolts

I believe this will stop leaking cooling liquid

Thanks and enjoy

Herman 

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On 7/16/2022 at 6:07 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

You can also remove the head bolts, after draining the coolant. Replace the bolts with studs rated for your application. Apply sealant to studs and install. Let sealant cure/dry before filling with coolant and tightening down new head studs. Most old head bolts will have a lot of corrosion on them. Compromising the threads from sealing.

 

On 7/16/2022 at 6:07 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

You can also remove the head bolts, after draining the coolant. Replace the bolts with studs rated for your application. Apply sealant to studs and install. Let sealant cure/dry before filling with coolant and tightening down new head studs. Most old head bolts will have a lot of corrosion on them. Compromising the threads from sealing.

I bought already 22 new bolts

Thanks and enjoy

Herman 

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On 7/16/2022 at 12:47 PM, 30DodgePanel said:

If it's a flathead six it's very easy to replace the head gasket. If you need pics there is some good info (as a guide) on youtube.

Simply search "removing head on flathead six". 

Thanks and enjoy

Herman 

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On 7/16/2022 at 12:33 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

Drain radiator, remove bolts, apply sealant to threads, reinstall bolts. If that does not work you may have a bad head gasket. It can be replaced without removing engine.

The radiator is new

The gasket also

I bought 22 new bolts

I hop now the problem is solved

Thanks and enjoy

Herm

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Herman

Did you buy the correct length (lengte) bolts,

On some Studebaker flathead engine there were two head bolts that were a little longer to bolt the accelerator bracket on.

IF you did not put the bolts back in the same place they came from , it could be that the two longer bolts did bottom out and the head gasket would leak.

Also rust from your old bolts accumulated in the bottom of the holes and prevented popper torquing.

I have not looked at the parts list for the Rockne engine to see if they specified longer bolts.

Did you buy new original bolts from a Studebaker vendor and did you check the length.

Some people use long studs and a nut with a washer on top of the head witch prevents these problems but they are unsightly and don't look original but it works. Check the bolts you took out and see if two were a bit longer.

Het Beste en mijn groeten.

Edited by rbk (see edit history)
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