Sactownog

GOT THE TRANSMISSION OUT OF THE 33

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Posted (edited)

Well guys, I got my 1933 Dodge 3 speed Manual transmission out of the car, was not to hard to pull out and inst to heavy either. 

 

I have found a 39 3 speed with OD I will be swapping in place of it. I will have to shorten the drive shaft to work. I am not sure if I want to swap out the rear end or not. 

 

I am leaning towards swapping the rear because I really hate the issues I have had with the outer seals on the rear end leaking oil. 

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Edited by Sactownog (see edit history)
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Well done 👍🏻 

Might be a good idea to swap it all out as the ratio’s could be different in the rear  end. 

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11 minutes ago, Mattml430 said:

Well done 👍🏻 

Might be a good idea to swap it all out as the ratio’s could be different in the rear  end. 

PLEASE EXPLAIN! i WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW THEY CORRELATE? 

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It might pay to find out the ratio of your diff you have in yours now and the find out the ratio of the donor car. They may be the same or slightly different, you don’t want to put an override box in to find it’s cancelled out by the diff from either. I hope I explained that ok. 

I found in the past same cars can have different ratio gearboxes and diffs depending on applications and engines. 

I can’t elaborate on your ratios in your car because I don’t know enough about them, just more of a thought from my experience with that sort of thing. I hope I haven’t confused the issue for you. 

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Good call Matt. In the 1939 Studebaker Commander, the car with o/d has a 4.82:1 diff. Without overdrive it is 4.55:1.

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i am planning to take out the rear end and either rebuild or replace with a better ratio. I am not sure how to tell what ratio the gears are without counting the gears. 

 

either way, having the OD transmission should be step 1 to getting this car a bit quicker on the road. 

 

I am curious how the 39 OD is engaged. any ideas? 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Sactownog said:

I am not sure how to tell what ratio the gears are without counting the gears. 

 

This is an open-driveline car, right?

 

Block the wheels. Jack up one rear wheel. Leave the other one touching the ground. Put the car in neutral and release the e-brake. Make a mark, or put a piece of tape on the driveline or u-joint flange so you can see how far the driveshaft turns. It helps to have 2 people. Make a mark on the tire you jacked up with a piece of tape.

 

Carefully rotate the wheel just enough to take out any slack in the gears and splines, without rotating the driveline.

 

Now, continue rotating in the same direction while watching the driveline (you probably need a second person to watch the driveline). Rotate the wheel exactly 2 turns. Count how many whole turns the driveshaft makes, and then note how much of a partial turn it made at the end.

 

For instance, 4-1/2 turns is about 4:50, and that gets you close. Then, if you know what ratios were available in your axle, you can pick the closest one. For instance, my Pontiac had 4:11, 4:44, 4:55, 4:89 available. It made a little more than 4-3/4 turns, so thats 4:89.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, Sactownog said:

I am curious how the 39 OD is engaged. any ideas? 

See my post of 18 Jun 2016:

If you read the other links I gave, one of them gives you the wiring diagram for the OD loom.

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Is the front shaft  length and spline count the same on your old and new transmission?  How about the throwout bearing -same set-up on both?  I’ll be interested to see how this goes in, especially with the Floating Power supports.

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spinneyhill, I did read your past thread, I am confused on the wiring part. HOWEVER the free float that came on the car has a cable that goes from the dash to the transmission.

 

I will be using that same cable as a PUSH/PULL for the OD.

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Posted (edited)

I can't remember seeing a rear axle housing vent cap on my D2 but there's a good chance it has one.  If that vent cap is gunked up and stuck pressure will rise develop inside the housing as it warms up and gear lube will be pushed out the axle seals.  This is a known issue with early 2000s Toyota trucks and I've seen it personally.  When you have a lube leak and the axle shaft seals look fine but you replace them anyway (3 times) but the leak continues it might be time to look elsewhere for the real cause.  I've been twisting the vent cap on every Toyota truck I inspect for a long time due to this issue.

 

BTW the vent cap will be screwed into the axle housing on the top surface left or right of center.  Can't remember which...

Edited by Pete in PA (see edit history)

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It is my understanding, based on what I read on these fora, that the original leather seals (inner and outer) allow a bit of "breathing" for heating and cooling of the air inside the axle and differential housing. Modern lip seals do not allow for that passage of air and oil is forced out. The early axles did not have a breather, e.g. the 1930 Dodge Brothers Eight does not.

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That is true of many makes and models. Leather or felt seals allowed a little bit of air to escape, and vents were often not provided. If you want to use modern seals, you will have to add a vent if there isn't one.

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Hey Sacto' : you don't have to change the rear axle ratio. That's what the O.D. Is for. You get the legs too long, and then the O.D. bogs down. Don't know what viscosity gear oil you are using. 90 could be too light, and obviously will leak more than 140, or even 250. You are in California, 250 can work just fine, and might not leak a drop. Real happy to see you enjoying this preciously preserved old original veteran.   -   CC 

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I will be taking out the rear end and doing a complete rebuild, I am not sure if there is a vent on top, I will check, may be something that I have not looked at to see if clogged. 

 

I will say that I purchased the Overdrive Transmission from George Asche and have been talking to him quite a bit the last few days, I have seriously learned so much from him regarding the transmission and rear end setup as well as engine mod's that can be done to give the little 230 flat head 6 a bit more umff. 

 

He also build's engines "which I am sure most know". I plan to take a call at the local Community college on engine building, however just to have his name attached to it, I may send my engine to him to rebuild so that his name is on both engine and transmission. "well see how that works out in the coming months".

 

I encourage all to call and talk to George Asche, the guy is a very knowledgeable person when it comes to these old cars and has been working on them since 1949. 

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