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Locomobile 4 Cylinder Gathering Place


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Here is a "one line" sketch from the top of a Model I Locomobile.  This sketch makes it look so simple we could probably build in in a couple of weekends......sure...

Al

 

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I thought those reading here may like to see a couple of original pictures of a 1911-12 Locomobile Model L Toy Tonneau.  These two pictures were purchased off EBAY and have some family names on the back.  Both pictures are of the same car.    If you know of an ancestor who owned a Locomobile this vintage, drop a note.  I may have your family pictures!

Picture 1

Al

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Can you ad a good quality  picture or two of any 1910 and earlier four cylinder Locomobile?  It would be nice to be able to scrutinize those pictures for the small but correct details that make the difference between a marginal restoration and a very good restoration.

Al

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Here's a 1909 model 30. Picture from the classic cars website. Lots more.

1909 Locomobile Model 30 Touring

Here's another.

Nostalgic automotive pictures including our family's cars - Page ...

Both of these cars appear to have original paint but neither were painted white. They are very similar but I don't believe they are the same car. That red looks very similar to a red I saw on a differential a fellow had laying out in the desert. That rear hub reminds me of the tow car I posted a picture of here somewheres. I have been looking for pictures of Locomobiles for a while now but these two pictures just popped up tonite.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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Nice pictures of the original 1909 - 10 Locomobile Model L Touring cars, (no front doors).  Hmmmm, I note something on both of these automobiles.  My study has suggested that the 1909 and 10 Models have rear fenders that do not have the skirt around the circumference of the fender.  Whereas the 1911 and 12 automobiles, (with front doors) DO have the skirting as shown on the factory release pictures posted just above.  I think both these original 1909 and 1910 automobiles have been updated with fenders from 1911 and 12 as the skirted fender is definitely a better design.  I will repost an original picture of a 1909 Locomobile Model L Baby Tonneau for comparison.  Maybe it is possible that later in 1910 the skirt was added....I just do not know.  Any thoughts from other readers?

Al

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Al, it looks like they used both styles of fenders. The factory brochure picture of the Torpedo above seems to show what you call a skirted fender but the Touring appears not to have the skirting. It may be a matter of body style. Then again, it could be that Locomobile only made the chassis and the bodies were farmed out. I'm not saying each body was custom, only that there were different people making the bodies. The fender treatment depended on which company made the body. Remember, Locomobile was a very low production company. 3-4 cars per day.

 

On a different subject, the story that all Locomobiles were painted white doesn't appear true. Both of the bodies above appear to have been red, with the lower car having blue accents and both cars appear to have blue fenders. Even the original picture you have posted above was a dark color. The two "identical" race cars Andrew Riker made in 1906 were painted white and grey. The Torpedo above appears white but the touring is a dark color. The next car posted is also a dark color. The Dick Shappy car has the same color scheme as the two model 30s posted above. You can't tell in the picture posted above but the car is for sale on vintagecarbuyers.com for $115,000 and there are more pictures posted.

 

Notice also the touring car in the brochure picture above has "eyebrows" on the front fenders but the Torpedo does not have eyebrows.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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This appears to be a 1909 model 30 (correct me if I'm wrong) and it has the eyebrow front fender and non-skirted rear fender.

Locomobile.jpg

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If this works, below might be a model 40. I'm beginning to think the red and blue was the factory colors for the model 30, though Al's running gear appears to have been red. I believe the model 40 cars were a deep blue. Again, I could be wrong, it has happened before. Notice again the eyebrows on the front fenders and no skirting on the rear fenders.

view.thumb.jpeg.80111e047a26e051834332e5132a85e7.jpeg

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It's not real clear on this one but I believe the rear fender is skirted

Illustration of a Touring Car Type L 30 Locomobile Company circa ...

This car has the  larger rear hub, which I believe is correct for the "30" model L. The car above, which I believe is a 40, has front and rear hubs that are the same size.

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This last picture appears to be a 1911 or 12 maybe 13) Model L "30" touring car.  The touring cars and limo's are the only Locomobile of the vintage 1909 1912 that used the rounded front fender and had the "bill" or eyebrow as has been mentioned.  The more sporty cars all used the flat top and raked to the running board as shown on the white Locomobile just above.  Another change is the design of the two man top assembly.  The factory release photo of the 1909 Model L Toy Tonneau shows the early design where the front top bow is mounted further down the the second bow.  This design is robust but makes access a bit more of a bugger.   The touring car above also indicates that a shift from Rushmore headlamps to the classy Solar headlamps has now taken place.  This touring car definitely does have the rear fender skirts, front doors and does  also appear to have Black and Brass Solar sidelights, which is a new thing for the 1911 and 12 (and 13) automobiles.  I also note that the replica Vanderbilt Trophy cup radiator cap ornament is not used on the 1911 and 12 cars, at least not from the factory.  I would like to get a copy of one of the original "Trophy Cup" radiator ornaments.  the Trophy may have been a factory ad on as requested.  Who knows more specifics?  The radiator also looks dark like this one is a painted over brass item indicative of the 1912-13 version.  I suppose that this touring car could also be a leftover car that is marketed in 1913.  It would be nice to know the motor number.  Lastly, my 1909 chassis does have the remains of white paint in hidden locations.  I would like to know more about the color schemes available or likely used during this vintage at Locomobile .

Al 

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Al, thanks for some clarification on the above pictures. There was a lengthy write up on the trophy radiator caps from a Locomobile expert. It may have been on the Old Motor website. Am I right that the white car above is a model 40?

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Click on this picture and it will take you to a write up on the trophy caps.

Vanderbilt Cup Races - Blog - Locomobile Vanderbilt Cup Sold on ...

By the way, this picture is taken in front of a Locomobile dealership. The car in the window also has a trophy cap. Interesting that this car has plain interior. Locomobile records indicate 900 of these trophies were sold.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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Nice reference and information regarding the Vanderbilt Trophy radiator ornament.  I have a much better understanding on that subject now.  From what I can gather, the toy tonneau body was always supplied with smooth leather upholstery, not tufted or pleated.   I can see where you would want your trimmer to build a bit of an angle into the bottom cushion or you would continually be slipping out of the seat with the smooth leather!!!  I must admit, I do like the look of smooth leather in this body style and tufted in a heavy touring car.   Locoman, do have more you can suggest about the white Locomobile shown above?

Al

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Another comment on the white toy tonneau shown above.  Can someone provide more pictures of that automobile?   I am planning a very similar windshield on my toy tonneau, (to keep the Mrs. happy while driving down the road) and would like to see how the wood windshield base is fastened to the cowl firewall.

Al

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More on the white Locomobile above.  It can't be a Model 40 as I can see the rear axle truss rod indicative of a shaft drive Locomobile.  I didn't know that the  early 48's, which this one must be, still used the truss rod support under the axle?

Al

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Al, if you click on the picture with your computer mouse, it will take you to the source of the picture. There, if you hover your mouse over the picture you will have a green square appear. Click in that and it will show an enlargement of that area. If you enlarge the left end of the windshield you will see the windshield is held in place by standard windshield clamps. I believe I bought a set from Restoration Supply many years ago.

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I tried to do a search of the RM auctions and I guess I simply do not know an easy way to search their website!  I AM CLUMSY!  Locoman, if you know a good way to search their information please share!  I would like to see the dash board and windshield from the passenger side.  Now, for those of you that are not familiar with the magic of the early Locomobile "Make and Break" ignition system, I will post a clip from the 1908 Locomobile Book for you to see a mechanical marvel that was soon surpassed by better technology as in the High Tension Magnetos and distributors.

Al

PS: Notice the verbage, "fourth successive season  and thus developed to a wonderfully high pitch of reliability and efficiency".  What a mouth full, but we must remember, Locomobile was already on the top of the automobile world by 1908 and is a technology leader.  The Make and Break system only lasted a couple more years and it was replaced with a better ignition system on all Locomobiles.  Not many Locomobiles running today are still using the Make and Break ignitions. 

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Locoman,

I was successful in looking at the 1913 white toy tonneau that sold on auction.  Thanks for the help!  I can see what I need to do...mostly!

Al

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Here is a question for early Locomobile owners, either 4 or c cylinder models.

I am desirous to get an idea for the gasoline cap.  I will build what I need or get a casting, but I do want to end up with as would have been from the factory.  Can anyone share a picture from a four cylinder car or an early six cylinder car, (Locomobile)?
Al

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  • 4 weeks later...

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