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Locomobile 4 Cylinder Gathering Place


alsfarms
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A friend of mine in Cal. Hunted Gray and Davis 934 for his 1910.  I have seen several period pictures with the 934 Gray and Davis lamps but have seen several with the Solar 933 lamps with Script.  It took me some time and patience but I did gather up enough lamps to put together a pair of Locomobile script Solar 933 lamps.  They are a heavy quality lamp.  I also really like the Gray and Davis.  The first picture I posted shows 933 Solar.  I will post a factory release photo that also has the 933 Solar.  The second (period picture) shows just the top of what I think is a Solar script bale handle tail lamp.  I have one of these also.

Al

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They are certainly very close in appearance.  The physical size is very close, both three tier.  The giveaway, in agreement with you, is the bottom shape of the font.  I simply had not noticed that shape before.  Gray and Davis is rather flat, whereas the Solar is rounded.  This is proving to me that lamps might have been mixed and not always sold in sets.  Lamps do certainly add to the charm of these early automobiles.  Lots to learn.  The 1911-12-13 Locomobiles used a very nice Solar oil electric side lamp more square in shape and certainly heavy as well as some Adlake and probably others.

Al

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Ok, I stand corrected, although I would probably call what you call a skirt, an edge treatment. I've always thought of a skirt as the part on the backside. It is amazing how many period photos show half flat tires. My understanding is this was partially because the tires have more traction in loose sand that way and may be more attributal to tube quality. The thing is, today, we are warned not to drive in this condition because the tube can travel on the rim and break the valve stem off. I have personal experience with this.

 

I wonder if Locomobile ordered lights with Locomobile script or if light companies produced them in an effort to sale lamps to new owners. If a car came with non-script lamps, a set of scripted lamps would be a nice upgrade.

 

I assume one reason front fenders might be skirted is because front fenders suffered more abuse. How many times have we seen a period photo with some guy laid out on the fender? No one could lay on the rear fender. From an engineering point of view, a skirt on the rear fender would be pointless and remember Andrew Riker was still chief engineer at Locomobile at this time. Just my two cents.

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My terminology is not the best on this particular subject.  What I refer to as a fender skirt could also be a drip edge, edge flange, trim or flashing. I really don't know what the absolute proper term would be.  I have the hunch that the after market parts was very full and active early on.  I imagine a MFG. Would contact for script lights in a way to market parts.  The MFG. would want script to help establish a brand.  To me, any brass era automobile with script lamps would deluxe.  Non script stuff are still very good but just not the same.  Thanks for the comment.

Al

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You know the old saying, "In order to have an intelligent conversation, you must first define your terms." It really makes no difference what term you use, as long as your audience understands what you mean by it.

 

I'm amazed at how many early locomobiles came with plain leather interiors. For such expensive cars, I would have thought they would all have diamond tuck. Maybe they were striving for "understated elegance."

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7 hours ago, alsfarms said:

Hello George, I agree with you.  I have seen no pictures, literature or real life Model I Locomobiles with a flat top radiator.  Now I have another Model L question for you, that involves the picture you posted. (by the way I have searched through 8000 pictures on eBay and either missed or could not find that picture with the idea of purchasing?). Now for the question.  I have the understanding that 1909 and 1910 Locomobile Model L types did not have skirts on the rear fenders.  Most of the pictures I have see as well as original literature support that thought.  Second, 1909 and 1910 models had no front doors on the Toy Tonneau body types.  The picture does show a Toy Tonneau, Model L with no front doors making it a 1909 or 1910.  The rear fenders confuse me as they appear to be skirted like the 1911, 1912 and 1913 Locomobiles.  Do you have a parts book that may straighten out what I thought was fact but may not be?

Al

eBay item # 403564022813 Is the photo. Just type that in and it’s a buy now.

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I located the Locomobile Toy Tonneau picture.  It looks like the happy woman traveler has just finished eating a cut of cantaloupe.  I was hoping that the picture was a 5 x 7 or better yet an 8-1/2 X 11....but nope.  This one is a very small picture.  Thanks for the item number.

Al

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1 hour ago, ak said:

It is spartan, functional.

 

The work of an engineer.

 

When I was researching Locomobile's racing history, I was struck by how much influence Andrew Riker had in the company. Locomobile had a board of directors and if I am correct, Riker was hired on as chief engineer, but it certainly seems like he ran the company for the time he was there.

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25 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

I located the Locomobile Toy Tonneau picture.  It looks like the happy woman traveler has just finished eating a cut of cantaloupe.  I was hoping that the picture was a 5 x 7 or better yet an 8-1/2 X 11....but nope.  This one is a very small picture.  Thanks for the item number.

Al

Al, it must be a fairly good quality picture. It blows up pretty nicely on my computer. Sure are a lot of suitcases in the back seat.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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I have been given the permission and encouragement to post additional pictures of the latest 1910 Locomobile Model L Speedster that has just changed hands.  The new owner has expressed his desire to build/restore this Speedster back to a more original body configuration.  The owner understands that the Speedster components are not factory but the running gear is actually quite authentic Locomobile.  I will post these additional pictures one at a time.  If you have thoughts or suggestions, please refer to the picture by number so we can see what you see.

Al

One

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Tell him to clean it up, and get it running. Put a thousand miles on it………then see if it’s worth the effort to build a replacement body. I would keep the speedster considering what he paid…….and find an intact touring car……two is better than one.

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