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HELP ! Start Car and gas pours from Carburetor 1936 Roadmaster


Budensor
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Ok Guys I very new to working on cars older than 1950's I've just bought my 1936 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton 80C and knew it would probably have some issue. Guys I need some help ! Ok the car has been running good but yesterday we where driving her and she active it had ran out of gas. So I put more gas in her and she would crank but would go dead. So we trailer her home. Today I started looking at the fuel system cleaned the fuel filter put it back in and she started right up. I when around to see if we had any leaks and she was pouring gas from the Carburetor so I shut her off and dried up the. So Guys I need some help knowing where to start looking ? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Bud

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Hi,

I believe the carburetor would be a Stromberg. My 37 RM did the same thing. I decided the best approach was to bite the bullet and send it off for rebuilding last week. Many capable services can be found with a google search. I have used Carburetor Factory for two carbs, and both worked perfectly when I got them back.

--Tom

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Tom Thanks for info.

Just talked to Charles Arnold the Buick technical advisor for 1936 & 1937. He though its the needle valve needs cleaning ( could have some trash in there ) or the bowl float. The carburetor was rebuilt by someone in New York not long before I bought this car.

Thanks Bud

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You probably have some trash in the bottom of the gas tank, and when you ran out of gas, that trash was pulled into the fuel line and got into the needle & seat in the carburetor, causing the fuel overflow. The particles of rust or whatever they are prevent the needle valve from closing off completely, so fuel continues to flow into the bowl of the carburetor and it overflows. Even though your carburetor was recently rebuilt, you probably have dirt and rust in the bowl now. You may not have to do a complete rebuild, just take the top off of the carburetor and clean out the bowl. You also need to make sure the needle and seat are clean. You probably have crud in the fuel line between the tank and the carburetor, so take an air hose and blow that out. You should also remove your gas tank and clean it out, because that is most likely where the problem originates.

Pete Phillips, BCA #7338

Leonard, Tx

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I would check the float - my 1929 did the same thing about 2 weeks after I bought it. Inside the carb was an aftermarket brass float with a tiny hole in the solder that let the float fill with liquid. Once that happens the float does not sit at the right level and gas just flows in uncontrolled. I am new to car repairs as well but it was easy to fix by just resoldering the hole closed. There is a little more to it than that, but I don't know what kind of float you have. If it is cork, then it might just be easiest to replace it.

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Well Guys thanks for everyone's help !

I took the Carburetor off the car and opened it up found the Float was just laying in bowl. The hinge pin (screw) was missing from the Carburetor. This allow the fuel to just flood the carburetor because the float could not cut the gas flow off. NOW I've got to find one of these Float Hinge Pin Screw. Does anyone where I might find one ? It's a Stromberg EE22 #7-10 has a Single Float and the Pin screws from the outside threw the hinge part of the float in to a hole on the other side of the bowl Or a spare part carburetor ?

Thanks

Bud Ensor

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Does anyone know where I might find one of these Float Hinge Pin ( Float Fulcrum Pin ) for this Stromberg EE-22 (7-10) carburetor.

Ok, Guys could not find one of the Float Hinge ( Fulcrum ) Pin. So I just made one from a 10/32x2" Brass Screw. I first chuck it up in a drill motor and filed the head down to the same size had the screw threads. Then measure the length of thread I needed then chuck the screw in the drill motor again and filed the rest of the screw down to go thru the float. Then cut the screw to correct length and it fix like a champ. The Stromberg carburetor is one of the more simple carburetors to work on !

Thanks to every ones help !

Bud Ensor

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Being able to "re-purpose" is a valuable asset in working on older vehicles. Congratulations!

However, your comment "The Stromberg carburetor is one of the more simple carburetors to work on !" is somewhat disturbing. I agree with you in principal, but be very careful with the fragility of the zinc alloy (pot metal castings). Especially the area where the fuel inlet screws into the bowl. These can break, and if they do break, the carburetor becomes a "parts carb". Patience is your friend.

Jon.

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The Float hinge pin ( screw ) when I got threw with making it looked like it should. I know how I did it was somewhat CRUD ! But I took my time as I was filing it and with a set of caliper and measure it as I went to get the size right. When I got it close I took fine emery cloth and finish off to proper size .123 then chase the 10/32 threads. Then after all I checked it in the carburetor by first finger title the screw before putting a screwdriver on it. After all said and you did not know it was hand make some would think it was original to the carburetor. And also do understand about POT METAL and how easy it is to break ! But no one would tell they had one I could buy and I wasn't just going to set and do nothing ! SO What did I have to lose by trying to make one but .75 cent Brass 10/32 x 2" screw and a little time.

Thanks everyone

Bud Ensor

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Disturbing?

Dale in Indy

Dale - yes, disturbing! While the EE-22 design is easy to understand, feeling really comfortable with the carb "simple to work on" might lead others down the path of broken castings.

Stromberg issued factory bulletins on the fuel inlet to their service shops, and the car makers. The car makers issued service bulletins to their mechanics; but we have over the years had several HUNDRED request for EE-22 bowl (not all Buick) simply because of a failure to use two wrenches on the fuel inlet when installing/removing the fuel line.

I sometimes wonder if the bulletins were used for "all-purpose" paper ;)

Jon.

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Give me a break,,,,, he said NOTHING disturbing, PERIOD. Just tell us WHAT he said was disturbing? It is a simple carb, as a carb guy you know such, he didn't say he put it In a vice or rough handled it. It's apparent he was very careful in his handling the issue.

I feel ' DISTURBING' was a poor word choice.

Dale in Indy

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Give me a break,,,,, he said NOTHING disturbing, PERIOD. Just tell us WHAT he said was disturbing? It is a simple carb, as a carb guy you know such, he didn't say he put it In a vice or rough handled it. It's apparent he was very careful in his handling the issue.

I feel ' DISTURBING' was a poor word choice.

Dale in Indy

Ok, Guys I'm 60 years old I've been working on carburetors almost all of my life. Like Holley's Quadrajet"s , Carter's ,Rochester's and a few others and this is my first time for a Stromberg ! I'm a old drag racer both Boats and Cars. And I know the importance of how to take things a part ! I own a near full set of tools including " Tubing wrenches " and I use them ! I also owe a GM carburetor Stand that was my wife's grandfathers and I use it too ! All I meant was Stromberg is a Simple carburetor to work on. I know I don't make my living working on Carburetors But there noting wrong with a Car owner working on his on !

Thanks to all of you on here !

Bud Ensor

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Bud - no offense was meant to you. If you took offense, I apologize. And as I stated in my first post, glad to see you were able to repurpose one item into something you could use. Wish there was more of that. Unfortunately, too many today are incapable of making a part they are having difficulty finding. Not only were you able to fix the unit at little cost, there is also a good feeling from doing so.

Dale - I like my word choice, and would use it again. Obviously you don't understand my meaning. I explained once, I have no desire to do so again. You might take a second look at paragraph 2 in post 15. Or not, your choice.

Good evening.

Jon.

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