Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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I found this at Metro Rubber and it looks perfect for what I need.  The gap between the window and the body is a little less than 3/8th of an inch, so this should fit the bill.

 

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Taylormade

Kevin BC here from downunder,

I had serious doubts about keeping water out of my windows especially the rear quarter vents, on my 30 Australian  DC Dodge8, as any water that got in had no where to run except to the wooden door pillar or into the back corner of the car. the doors at least had a couple of slots cut in the wood that the water could escape through. My Car was actually rusted out in the corners at the rear of the guard from water running to that area, and sitting in years of dust , mixed with timber. The cars when made weren't meant to be still in use 90 years later

I pondered this problem for several months, and came up with an idea, that worked for me, I got some black pond liner, fixed it to the window sill, dropped it down under the window  glass(Lowered to its lowest position of course), and then came back up the window glass  on the inside, and fastened it to the pillars with hot glue making a bag around the window. In the bottom of the bag I glued a faucet nut and tail, and to the tail I glued some plastic tube into the end of the tube & ran it out through the timber at the door pillarto below the chassis. It was a lot of mucking around but I know there will never be another rust problem in that area. The door windows could be done the same as any water could be dumped out the bottom of the door.

I know we are not talking large quantnities of water, but be able to disperse  any moisture out of the doors & bodies  is a big positive in my view. Will find the photos and give you a look at them

regards

Kevin

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Kevin BC here again with some photos.

In the 2nd photo the threaded part in the bottom of the bag I ground the sides of the fitting, the ends of the bag are glued together , and then glued to the vertical pillars under in my case the wooden plinth holding the arm rest and window winder mech. The window actually winds down into the bag, which you can see is approx 2" wide.

Sorry I don't have more photos of the window area

Regards

Kevin

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Posted (edited)

My Restoration Supply order will be delivered tomorrow.  Now I can finally get the firewall pad done and finish wiring the car.  Another bit of good news - I located a water-jet cutting facility less than thirty miles form my home.  Considering i live in the middle of nowhere, this was an amazing find - especially when I talked to the owner and he said he did small jobs.  So, today I drove over and showed him the window rollers I had discussed in an earlier post.  Here's a shot of them in Phil Kennedy's 32DL.

 

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And what they look like laid flat.

 

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The owner said there was no problem cutting them out and offered to do the tech drawings since it was so simple.  We discussed the problem of rolling the metal extensions around the shaft and determining the length of the extensions before rolling them.  I think I can manage this with some heat and careful massaging.  He suggested we cut ten in case there was a learning curve on assembling them.  I need three, so I asked for the price and held my breath.  Ten bucks.  Well, scrape me off the floor!  Hopefully, I'll have some spares if anyone needs any.  Easily worth a ten spot considering I was going to try and cut them out with a grinding wheel.  Now I can guarantee I'll have all ten fingers for another few weeks.

 

 

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)
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I picked up my window roller blanks from the water-jet cutter.  The best ten bucks I've spent in a long time.  He made me twenty - I only need three, so plenty to practice on.  Looks like a little heat to bend them around a steel rod and chamfering of the holes and I'll be ready to go.

 

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I've been trying to work on the car early mornings and evenings to avoid the mid-day heat.  Summer has arrived here with a vengeance. Not all that easy as I got into the firewall pad today and ended up working well into the afternoon.  The thermometer read 95 when I came in from the garage, but I got a lot accomplished today.  I was lucky that my original firewall pad survived relatively intact, so I had a good pattern to work with.  it's not very pretty, and I taped over the unnecessary holes, but there was enough left to make a pattern.  The solid section, about 1/2 inch thick, is still glued to the jute backing, but the front cover has fallen off - but I still have it.

Here it is in all its glory.

 

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I got started by tackling the solid center which appears to be made of homasote.  The new homasote that I bought at a nearby big box seems to be nearly identical to the worn, warped stuff on the original.  Even the thickness and faint pattern on the surface is the same.  I made a pattern and cut the homasote with my jigsaw.  it made nice, clean cuts with no problems.

 

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I did a bit of edge sanding to make sure the final shape was accurate.

 

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Then I cut out all the small shapes around the edges and the openings for the wires and cables.

 

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I was happy to find that when I laid the new homasote over the old piece, the fit was exact and all the pins that hold it to the firewall matched with no problem.

 

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I have jute padding and firewall card from Restoration Specialties, so I'll be cutting those out and gluing everything together tomorrow.

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Looking good.

Not sure about your wiring when running it along the car but I started at the fuel tank and ran it all the way back to the firewall only to find that the thick part on the inside under the dashboard wouldn't fit through the firewall. Had to remove it and start running it from inside the car, through the firewall and then around to the fuel tank. Had to also remember to feed the grommet surrounds along the wiring ....after a second try !......as once you run the wiring, its too late.

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I think my car has a slightly different setup.  The wires to the dash run up the firewall and through a single hole in the firewall.  There are only a couple of wires in that part of the loom.  Three wires run from the rear of the car (the fuel sending wire and the brake and stoplight wires) in a loom that runs along the inside of the frame on the drivers’s side.  These wires come out from the frame ahead of the body and into the engine compartment, never touching or going through the firewall.  So, in my case, I think I’m okay.  I’ve had all the wiring in place for two or three years and I just went out in the garage and checked things over.  The firewall pad will go in place and I only need to feed the dash wires into the car - and there is plenty of room to get them through.  Thanks for the tip, though, I could have been caught with my pants down!

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4 hours ago, Ian_Greenlaw said:

Had to also remember to feed the grommet surrounds along the wiring ....after a second try !......as once you run the wiring, its too late.

 

Raise your hand if this has happened to you!!!! 🖐️

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Taylormade, 7/1/20

Wow and thanks for sharing. I think I communicated with Phil quite some time ago?  I may have send him a picture of my DL6?  He shared that some folks put the bumpers on wrong.  I may have to get back to him when I get to the bumpers on my Dodge.

Way interesting story.  What is your progress to date and how long ago was your story written? 

I took my 32 DL-6 apart 40 years ago and have started to put her back together.  I can not recommend waiting 40 years ta put a car back together!  We moved 300 miles in the mean time and the parts kinda got mixed up.  I did have a parts car which is still available as needed.  It's new job is a piece of yard art.  Being the old guy I am I have trouble doing this Forum stuff???  I will be most surprised if this note ever gets to you.

I'd be more than interested in seeing your progress.  I might be able to send pictures of my project if I get smarter.  Not many of the old DL-6s around.

Torry Johnson

torryjohnson32@hotmail.com

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Well, there are currently 74 pages of “progress” to wade through on this thread.  You can go back to page one and see it all if you can stand it.  Currently the frame, springs, axles, brakes, engine, transmission, body, fenders, fuel system and chrome are all restored.  I’m currently putting in the window glass and door mechanisms.  The interior is the last hurdle and will be installed as soon as I’m done putting in the new floorboards.  I hope to take it out for a first drive late this summer.  I bought the car in 1965, sold it in 1967, bought it back in 2013 and have been restoring it ever since.

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