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Challenge - what does this artist do well?


trimacar
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OK, here's the challenge. The object that's in the picture frame was owned by a great artist, and he gave it to me.

I've had this thing squirreled away, and wanted to share it, so I brought it straight as an arrow up from the garage, and took the picture. For some reason, it's turned sideways in the picture, but that's fitting, as with this artist horizontal or vertical makes no difference.

It's interesting that he does what he does, as by his own admission, he's blind in one eye and can't see out of the other.

So, I brushed it off, hung it on the wall straight as I possibly could, and took the picture.

What is it, and what does the artist do concerning antique automobiles?

post-31482-143138692463_thumb.jpg

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Guest Xprefix28truck

Well I really have no idea, but I will take a stab at it. I see an American flag, and there are many colors. So I'm guessing it is his interpretation of the 4th of July. And since it is "pleated", does he do interiors?

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No, Kent, but interesting "ink blot" guess, I hadn't even seen the flag, but now that you mention it...

Those stripes were actually on the object before he got hold of it...sheesh, clues everywhere..

No, he doesn't do interiors, if he did it would be a mess......

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Well, sure, I'll tell everyone the story, after some guesses, and at some point blues clues will find a way. Hmmm, the prize is, uh, well, I'll upholster your car for free, but only if you deliver it to my house on the second Tuesday of the 6th week of December.....or I can give you a smile and a hearty handshake at Hershey next year!!

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Susan, sorry I missed meeting you at Hershey this year...but you got a hug from Marty, and as close as we are, I've never gotten a hug...oh wait, that's right, I don't want one....

You're very close, yes, it's a wipe rag, but what, specifically, does he paint?

You guys got it very quickly. He really is hard of sight (as in hard of hearing), and uses a bright light and magnifying lense glasses to practice his craft....

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I searched for a few years to find someone to pinstripe my 31 Pierce.

Most people wanted to lay tape down, and paint between the tape, and of course some said just use plastic tape. No way.

I wanted a true, hand laid, pinstripe, even if it wasn't perfect, in fact, that's part of the charm of an early pinstripe, thinking that when the stripe got just a little thinner, what was the man thinking when he did it?

My buddy Greg always said that doing pinstripes is mostly mental, and it's true, it takes a while for the artist to work up to it, then it goes quickly.

This gentleman came to my garage, and confessed the sight issues. Using a strong light and magnifiers, he laid the stripe on my car, and it's perfect to me. Subtle, just the right width, and by hand.

As he was leaving, he stated he was throwing away his wipe rag, as it had seen better days. I took it, and really like the colors and stories that must be held in its fiber.

best to all David C.

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This is the absolute truth, my original thought was that he did pin striping. But then the marks that looked like his whole fingers didn't make sense. I should have followed my first instinct. :o

I am sorry that I missed you also. I had hoped to meet you. Marty will be hurt when he finds out you don't want a hug. His hugs are AWESOME!!! :D

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Actually, if you read my posts carefully, the guy who got it from the artist (me) NEVER called it art. I only stated I got it from an artist, and the gentleman who does the pinstriping is that.....I stuck it in a frame that was laying around, but surely agree that doesn't make it "art".

The wide red stripes are misleading, as they're a design in the original white towel. It's a full size bath towel, you're only seeing part of it.

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We had a very famous, local artist, here in New Bern, N.C., that has done work in New York and some places in Washington, D.C in his earlier years.

Many of his paintings survive and are coveted by local people.

He passed away a few years ago. He was a great friend of my family and myself. He was an amazing human being. I loved the guy. Was always fascinated by his work depicting local history. Unbelievable man.

His name was Willy Tagalieri. Forgive the spelling. His youngest daughter, is carrying on were Willy left off. She is a great artist also.

Willy, wore bib, denim, overalls when he painted and they were also works of art. (as is your towel). His overalls were his hand towel.

I asked his daughter about his bib overalls one day, long after he had passed away. I wanted to buy a pair of them and begged her to NOT throw them out or get rid of them..

She looked at me like I was crazy and just laughed it off.

I wonder what they would bring at a local, silent auction, for Habitat For Humanity??

Bill Harmatuk

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but surely agree that doesn't make it "art".

I am an art collector in a number of media. I've had many heated discussions with other collectors over what is "art". I resoundly reject the notion of one of my long-term friends that "If an artist calls it art, it's art".

In my opinion there has to be a degree of skill before anything should be called art. Throwing paint at a canvass and then rolling in it does not constitute skill, IMO, nor does cleaning your brushes on a cloth make it art.

Just my $ .02, for what it's worth.

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I agree, Barry, and I never presented it as "art", but rather as a colorful relic of many, many pinstriping jobs. I believe it has a certain charm as a reminder of those tasks, and by laying it in a wooden frame that happened to be handy, did not intend to pass it off as art, just a way to showcase it.

It's a towel with some paint on it. Thought it would be fun to share. I guess I'm one of them too, but there sure are some tough critics here!! (note that I didn't say ART critics)

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I would have, and DO save things like that. AND I have some of them in frames.

My Next project is to frame a pack of blue carbon paper. Beautiful envelope with carbon paper inside. Would be a great wall hanger in my Wife's Real Estate office.

What year did the Xerox machine hit the market.??

I just do remember when the only way to make a copy was carbon paper then the hand crank machine with the drum.

Many people these days have never seen a "pin striper" at work or seen a pin striping brush.

Bill H

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For years we have had a guy in the Charleston, W. Va. area, Milt, that did/does the old school, done by hand pin striping and decorative type work that adorned both antiques and street rods. I recentlly saw him at a local show and he was carrying his painting supplies in a well worn wooden carry case. :)

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Actually, if you read my posts carefully, the guy who got it from the artist (me) NEVER called it art. I only stated I got it from an artist, and the gentleman who does the pinstriping is that.....I stuck it in a frame that was laying around, but surely agree that doesn't make it "art".

The wide red stripes are misleading, as they're a design in the original white towel. It's a full size bath towel, you're only seeing part of it.

Sorry....I misspoke.

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