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butchered cars


GARY F

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I don't know why some people ask for an opinion and when they get one they don't like they whine. It is just an opinion. Not necessarily the wrong opinion, or the right opinion. Just an opinion. What do you expect? This is the AACA forum. Go ask the same question on a hot rod forum and you'll get the opinions you wanted in the first place. "Great hot rods - all of them." Terrific choice of colors. All 3 deserve people's choice awards. Lets chop them all up and drop crate motors in all of them. No wait, The Buick gets a late model Buick engine. Let's keep em "authentic Buick". A Pierce Arrow gets a , ah, ah, ah, what hot rod engine does a Pierce Arrow get to keep it "authentic".

Very true.

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Sometimes a radical modification makes for something really interesting. Take this 1929 Buick. A great car, but is this butchered or an important historical artifact?

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It's an Argentine hearse. Cowl forward is an RHD '29 Buick, but what follows is a chassis lengthened to 17' with a body carved from mahogany and heavily lacquered, turning it into a cultural relic and visual treat even the most avid Buick purist would appreciate. It is in a private collection of hearses (including a 1916 Winton) on display at the California Auto Museum in Sacramento until December.

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This is different as it would have been converted when it was new. That is not the same as taking an antique in excellent condition and rodding it.

Ok, so what is someone found a 29 Buick today in excellent condition and built a clone of the pictured vehicle?

Would it make a difference if the pictured vehicle no longer existed and someone wanted to recreate that vehicle from the photos of it?

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The man I bought my 37 dodge from had 3 model A's for sale. One was a nice coupe with a rumble seat. I am not a model motor fan. I told him if he would install a V6 in it I would buy it. His coment was NEVER!

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It is still a reality that many AACA award winning show cars are bought by rodders with a lot of money and turned into street rods. This happens even to true Classics. We have had posts on here before by Dave@Moon showing pictures of everything from Packard Darrins to Continental Mark II's with chopped tops. I know they have the right to do what they will with their cars, but I wish they did not "rod" these fine cars. IMHO!

I cringe at the thought of the '40 Continental my Father lovingly restored that earned CCCA Senior car status being used for such a purpose.

I've tried to track it down, but it seems to have fallen off the face of the earth. That's what makes me nervous.

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Ok, so what is someone found a 29 Buick today in excellent condition and built a clone of the pictured vehicle?

Would it make a difference if the pictured vehicle no longer existed and someone wanted to recreate that vehicle from the photos of it?

Cadillac and some other manufacturers offered a commercial chassis. Not sure if Buick did. So even in 1929, a Buick might not have been cut up to make this.

I see no reason to destroy a 1929 Buick to make one of these now. Even if the original no longer existed, and they wanted to recreate one. It appears there is not much of a Buick there except in front of the cowl. They could just use a junkyard wreck for those parts as the rest will have to be built from scratch anyway.

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Well now, gents, I don't think we should abandon all hope. Last summer, my high school buddy's daughter got married and my '14 T was in the wedding along with a Ford V-8 replica, a '65 Mustang, and a '67 Pontiac. After the photos at the lake, the kids all re-distributed themselves among the cars for the ride back to the reception. The guys all made for the late-model stuff; the girls ran them over "claiming" the T. Of course, maybe it was me and not the car. :D

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Guys, looks to me as though we are beating a dead horse. Dont believe there will ever be a consensus. My 2 cents.

Ben

You can't even roll this horse over as it has been beaten into dust. :)

There is a good reason why there are so many different type clubs, so everyone with various tastes can join whichever one they like. If you don't like what the AACA represents (stock), it possibly isn't the club for you.

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If the pile is cheap enough buy it and sell it off piece by piece. Scrap prices nose dived last year but you can still get a few bucks for the leftovers. One less car makes the others more rare, that sometimes increased their value.

I doubt there is much demand for a 1 of 1 survivor Chevette, but I could be wrong because some people collect the oddest things including me.

I could NOT agree MORE!! Those 350s may be easy and inexpensive to build, but I am sooooo tired of seeing nothing but THOSE in every rod. After all...how many different ways can you make those look?

Sometimes it is a matter of getting it on the street or having it side there due to the insane cost of parts to make it run or the unobtainablitiy of parts.

Example that comes to mind was a lost of the Jaguars of the the 1970's and 1980's. To make the engine right and cure the driveability problems will cost you many times what the car is worth. If its between seeing them cruising around with a 350 or being crushed into a cube I choose the former.

I agree, whatever works for you. Nothing wrong with chrome wheels per se. I'm not about to tell people how to live their lives, and I don't consider everyone who disagrees with me to be wrong. But that's not really the point, is it? What I'm talking about is the general trend. If half the people would tell me about how they'd chop up my car, that's perfectly fine. When it's closer to 98%, something's wrong.

I have 1991 Caprice "bubble" is the slang term. I FEEL YOUR PAIN.

It is true that there is some fantastic body work on some street rods/hot rods, but that's not really the point of the discussion. The point of the discussion is that this car is/was a historical artifact, one that can and will never be produced again and it is a diminishing resource. For every one that that is lost to rodding, there is one less to be saved for history. Pre-World War II cars, particularly the "fat fendered" cars that rodders love to modify are getting very difficult and expensive to find today. It just seems wrong to me and I hatge to see each one of these survivor cars lost forever. Here in Florida if you go to a "Cruise-in" the local population doesn't even know what an original car looks like, and have no idea they didn't "come that way", lowered in the front with chomre wheels and a 350 V8 and bucket seats. I'm serious, they don't even know the difference.

Don't be offended. A lot of people are just specatators there. It is something to do other then a night at the movies or downtown. They have no interest in the cars as a whole. Its just "SOMETHING DIFFERENT TO DO A FEW TIMES A YEAR."

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