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1932 Packard 906 Twin Six Seven Passenger Sedan


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Hello,

Attached (hopefully) are pictures of my next sympathetic restoration project, a very original and almost virtually untouched 1932 Packard 906 Twin Six Seven Passenger Sedan. The car is perhaps the only closed 906 that exists. The project includes mechanics (hoses, fan belt, carb, fuel pump and etc), replacement of broken die cast, some minor paint touch up, repainted wheels, replated lock rings, restored hubcap emblems, and new 7:50 X 18 Bedford Double White Wall Tires (they came last week and are spectacular) from Lucas Tire. This week the project consisted of research and new Wiper Arms from Ficken. A new stainless driver's taillight bracket came today via Marge Verdone. We were also lucky several weeks ago to track down its original sidemount tread covers and are on the look out for the original side plates. The project for next week is having a locksmith make the missing keys (tool box, battery box, ignition, pass door, and tire locks). A few other people are helping with missing parts as well and we will update you as this project shapes up.

Does anyone have a set of Trico air horns or at last trumpets ? You will see a broken up set on the front and will replace them as holes are drilled in front fenders.

Does anyone have a V-12 rack and/or a set of luggage rack strips? I can make do with the non 12 rack if needed.

How about a driver's side interior sunvisor ?

Who has recast the passenger side hood handle ?

This car is in the permanent collection of Citizen's Motor Car Company, America's Packard Museum, in Dayton, Ohio. The museum is in an original Packard dealership from 1917 and sits on a 1/4 downtown city block.

The museum is starting an "Adopt A Car" program (I am first with this 32) and we are starting a more active volunteer base (time for some handy people to come out of their retirement - plenty of projects for every taste). If interested in helping, please e-mail me at johnmereness@aol.com

<span style="color: #CC0000">Visit:

The Citizens Motor Car Company

America's Packard Museum</span>

420 S. Ludlow St.

Dayton, Ohio 45402

Office 937.226-1710

Fax 937.224.1918

<span style="color: #3366FF">AmericasPackard@aol.com</span>

A Section 501 ©(3) organization under

the Internal Revenue Code.

All gifts are fully tax deductible.

Thanks,

John M. Mereness, Esq.

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Here are a few interior photos. A good cleaning and some careful moth repair is very much in order.

<span style="color: #CC0000">Visit:

The Citizens Motor Car Company

America's Packard Museum</span>

420 S. Ludlow St.

Dayton, Ohio 45402

Office 937.226-1710

Fax 937.224.1918

<span style="color: #3366FF">AmericasPackard@aol.com</span>

A Section 501 ©(3) organization under

the Internal Revenue Code.

All gifts are fully tax deductible.

JMM

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Hi John, I will PM you about a long time clasic era restorer/collector/shop owner that might be of some help. He is mainly Packards of that age, with some big Cadillacs/etc thrown in. He is the guy that helped me track down the former owners of my 32 Nash.

I'll find his card and send the info today.

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Hello,

I did not get very far this week due to the job search - so much for negotiating Software purchases for one of the World's largest banks. I did snap some engine photos for those asking and I did grab the battery box lid to start getting keys made (hopes are that same key fits Battery, tool, and spare tire locks, perhaps even a door handle if we hold our breath.

JMM

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This weeks visits were productive in many other ways also. Cincinnatian's Dan Shaw and his son Joshua Shaw (well known in Rat Rod, Hot Rod, pinstripping, sign painting, and historic race car restoration), were kind enough to stop in all day Friday and touch up the original paint and pinstripe on the Museum's 1935 Packard Dietrich Twelve Convertible Sedan. The big yellow car was looking very enticing to play connect the dots on so their help is greatly appreciate. The Twelve also runs super sweet thanks to Daytonian, Don Boeke, "The Egyptian."

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  • 2 weeks later...

Twin Six gets a radiator cap rebuild via parts courtesy of Max Merritt. The cap was loose as a goose and sat crooked. Inspection revealed the inside of the cap was cobbled up junk from the inside of an old gas cap. Now with new reproduction guts it actually will be able to function as a cap - nice reproduction part.

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Stopped in on Tuesday after a job fair at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (thousands of unemployed people showed up - a real mad house but made two really good contacts - helps being from a top 5 global business) and installed a pair of pedal pads from Bill Hirsch

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Made some progress on Friday. Several weeks ago a tailight base came from Marge Verdone and I have been prepping it to installation - which went very well. The original was badly broken and being die cast was best replaced with a new casting (in this case stainless). Also Hoosiers (the nickname given to people from Indiana) Steve and Roger Gardner stopped in the prior weekend and traded me (they needed a Bijur pump) the rare Trico Clarion Air Horn buggles to replace the destroyed originals - You see these installed in the same place on only two other cars - both of which were custon designed for personal use by Walter P. Chrysler (a roadster and a sedan that both survive today). Also, installed a new gas cap from Bill Hirsch to replace the original - they must have heard something fall off so they backed up over it see what it was.

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Had a few unexpected projects on Friday. First one was that the 1947 (originally purchased by ganster Al Capone - his last new car ever purchased prior to death) would not run so worked with the guyes through the day. Here is a picture of Scott with it at perhaps midnight just prior to being able to get it to run.

Therafter, we were discussing the 30 Town Car and determined the car was in dire need of a trunk for storage of misc items that would be required for its use in a Saturday wedding - so we scavanged up a trunk from the basement and gave it a good clean up. Surprise was that trunk was filled with a perfect set of luggage (temp set aside). Argh, we finished this project at like 1:30 a.m.

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Here is a little project that I need parts for - does anyone have the automatic choke linkages for a Stromberg EE-22 Carb for a 1933 and 1934 Packard Super or Standard 8 ?

Also, did have a second to snap a picture of the building late in the day Friday.

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Roy's daughter from Roy's Locksmith Shop on Third Street makes all the keys for the Twin Six. The Oakes Locks give her grief for almost three hours - apparently they used die cast lock fingers for 1932 - cheap and frozen up - one comes out fine after hours and the other is hopeless and has to be drilled (Casting survived and just needs new fingers and tumbler). Keys are good.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The whole engine is pretty impressive. I started cleaning on it and was amazed at the amount of chrome and nickle trim on it and on the firewall. I also started cleaning underneath the car and it is perhaps nicer paint than on the topside (someone coated whole car with oil underneath, but what a filthy dirty mess to get to the paint).

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No, not a Lumber Jack or Paul Bunyan, but a rather surprised (did not see my camera coming) James from Grismere Tire in Downtown Dayton. He was just coming back from a truck roadside repair when I called and begged for help. Problem was the tires were 8 ply truck and could have stood on their owwn without air - HAAAAAAAAARRRRD as a Rock. The bead on each tire excepting the one original Firestone spare was almost 1 1/2 inches thick each (not much room when you also have an area on a 4 1/2 inch rim that has a metal valve stem through it. James had all the proper tools and basically resorted to brute force. He spent nearly 3 hours to demount 6 tires.

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Finally, Stone Guard Brackets are made and installed. Hours were spent cleaning up the stoneguard (it has a brass screen behind it that was polished - and now has been repolished), repairing emblem, and getting whole thing mounted.

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Cecil makes beautiful horns - The ones on the car may clean up (so much to clean and so little time available each week) and have no dents; but if they do not clean then Cecil will be my first phone call. Glad to hear hear he is still in business.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: John_Mereness</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Finally, Stone Guard Brackets are made and installed. Hours were spent cleaning up the stoneguard (it has a brass screen behind it that was polished - and now has been repolished), repairing emblem, and getting whole thing mounted. </div></div>

I think you just solved my stone guard mystery. I have the same stoneguard that I bought off Ebay and had replated for my 32 Deluxe eight. However, I could not figure out how to mount it. It did not seem to fit. Mystery solved as it appears that it would fit a twin six and not a deluxe 8 because of the headlight bar on the eight.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Crisis possibly adverted on Memorial Day: Roughly 12 hours to actually clean out oil pan (with a hammer and a chissel) and pick-up screen - it was TOTALLY CLOGGED (plus, it took 1/2 hour to get pan dropped and 40 minutes to reinstall. Sorry, did not have camera, but take it as a lesson - ENGINE WOULD HAVE BEEN DESTROYED IF I HAD STARTED IT.

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Wednesday, May 27th: Lock rims picked up the Monday prior to Memorial Day and they came out rather nice. Wheels were picked up from the painter the Thursday before Memorial Day. Todd the owner of RIMWORKS in Centerville did a very good job. Todd sandblasted and painted, but also had to repair some curb damage, misc scrapes, and one chunked out section of rim that was on the driver's side rear wheel (someone had apparently run it into a curb and not only damaged rim, but also caused damage to the threads on the brake drum (a quick call to Ted Davis in OK revealed thread was 9/16 x 18 (friend Glenn Grismere happened to have a tap) and all holes were rethreaded except one that was a hopeless and all bolts were basically hopeless as well so replacements were sourced.

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Wednesday May 27th - Picked the wheels up from Grismer tire and they did a great job in mounting (and little to no paint damage as well - which you know is nearly impossible on a lock ring / snap ring style wheel). So here are the pictures of the wheels mounted to the car.

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Engine bay is starting to take shape with lots of cleaning and I rebuilt the fuel pump and carb (plus did quite a bit of work to get coils in the car - they were stolen or lost - jury is still out. Carb is an EE-3 and is beautifully built (that was 8 hours of my life that I am never getting back).

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So what do you use when taken off or re-installing wheels ? Of course, you use a jack that is as old as the car. Check out its size. We may just start calling it a crocodile. BELIEVE IT OR NOT, WE HAVE TWO (2) SUCH JACKS and the other was camping out under thwe 1939 Lilly Pond Packard 120 Rollson Town Car while Frank Crawford and Mike Mereness (my dad) were adjusting valves.

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So you have heard of 1920's and early 1930's CCCA cars having undercarriages color keyed to match the exteriors - the 1932 Twin Six is one of those cars and what you are looking at is what you find when willing to get the dirtiest you may ever get in your life - the frame has been well oiled to protect the underside. There are only a handful of cars that can come close to this car in originality and condition.

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First let me thank you for sharing these great photos with us. Amazing collection.Please forgive my lack of Packard lore but after viewing these pictures I just had to find out more so I Googled "Grey Wolf" and I came up with 2 different cars, similiar but different. Can anyone explain?

Howard Dennis

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There are actually two (one original and one reproduction). The Packard Museum in Dayton has the original and the other is an amazing duplicate has been built using the original drawings by a fellow by the name of Ted Davis in Oklahoma (at the cost of some half million dollars). My guess is the original was saved in the early days of car collecting by Barney Pollard of Detroit. The original is powered by a very rare Model K Packard engine. My understanding was the original was wrecked at some early point (1904 or so) and the restoration was done in the early days of car collecting to a level that was the best available for the time period though is not up to today's standards. I am not sure if Ted's is powered by an original "K" engine or an exact reproduction (stunning nevertheless) engine. Both cars were exhibited together at Amelia Island Concours two years ago (see www.conceptcarz.com for pictures). JMM

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