Larry W

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Everything posted by Larry W

  1. I agree, look it over closely to see if it mounts the same. I believe the 371 was used through 1960 in 88's with 2bbl carbs. This pump may have been correct for those, but could possibly be used on earlier models.
  2. These are all very good suggestions to try. In addition, you might look at your gas cap. If a vented cap is required, and your using a non-vented type, that could cause your problem. An easy test would be to just drive around with the gas cap removed and see if the problem recurs. Also, I would install a temporary jumper wire with a ballast resistor and alligator clip at each end between the battery positive post and the positive terminal on the ignition coil. Make sure that the negative coil terminal is the one going to the distributor . Take precaution against this arrangement from shorting out to ground. You'll have to connect and disconnect (from the battery end) to start and stop the motor. Let us know how things turn out. We're all anxious for you to solve this problem.
  3. These are all very good suggestions to try. In addition, you might look at your gas cap. If a vented cap is required, and your using a non-vented type, that could cause your problem. An easy test would be to just drive around with the gas cap removed and see if the problem recurs. Also, I would install a temporary jumper wire with a ballast resistor and alligator clip at each end between the battery positive post and the positive terminal on the ignition coil. Make sure that the negative coil terminal is the one going to the distributor . Take precaution against this arrangement from shorting out to ground. You'll have to connect and disconnect (from the battery end) to start and stop the motor. Let us know how things turn out. We're all anxious for you to solve this problem.
  4. Looking for a 1953 Olds, preferably an 88 2 door to try to save a very rough convertible . Search Google Images 1953 Oldsmobile, it's the one from a field in Rio, WI.
  5. This looks like a 1955 Buick center grille piece.
  6. I'm probably wrong, but somehow I get the feeling that it may be off an old commercial fishing boat. Just a guess.
  7. I believe many of these guys just hack those things together in order to try and make a quick and easy buck. Witness most of the automotive themed reality shows on television. They usually find some fool willing to part with his money.
  8. A friend of mine has a '51 Imperial 2 dr http in the same condition asking $1600.
  9. Would these headlights be same as '33 Dodge?
  10. Would the headlights be the same on a '33 Dodge?
  11. I would remove the fuel pump, and not plug the hole in the front cover. pour about one ounce of fuel down the carburetor and start the engine. If the squeak is gone, you've narrowed down the source of the problem, somewhat. With the fuel pump on the bench, actuate the arm and listen for the squeak. if you hear it from the full pump, that could be the problem, but I doubt it. Hopefully, when you ran the engine with the fuel pump removed, you got a big mess of oil coming out of the access hole. If you got little or no oil squirting out, I suspect that you are not getting oil to the front of the engine and that the eccentric that drives the pump is dry and squeaking, (along with your new timing chain and gear.) To help verify this, apply a dollop of grease to the tip of the pump lever where it contacts the eccentric and re-assemble. Start the engine, and if the squeak is gone, you've narrowed down the problem further. It's not fixed; the squeak will return. You'll have to dis-assemble the front of the engine to determine why. Perhaps the cam shaft retainer plate was improperly installed. Study your Shop Manual! As far as break in, it is imperative that you load the engine in order to seat the rings. By that I mean drive the car to get the transmission into top gear and then accelerate just hard enough so that the transmission doesn't drop down into a lower gear, up to about forty five or fifty miles an hour and then back-off. Repeat this about a dozen times. Also, you may want to check the break-in procedure in your Owners Manual. Make sure that you're using a motor oil with a HIGH ZINC CONTENT. Closely monitor oil pressure and temperature to make sure they remain within specifications, and shut the motor off immediately if they don't. Don't break-in this motor on a hot day! As far as a vacuum leak, how does it idle? Is it slow and even? Short out the sparks plugs one at a time, while at idle. The one that has the least effect could be an indicator. Remove all eight spark plugs and compare their appearance. The off color one could be a clue. Acquire a vacuum gage, and learn how to use it. Also, do a compression test. The lowest cylinder could point to a problem. I've given you enough to ponder for now, let me know what you find. Good Luck!