Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. When it comes to cutting gaskets, I'm about as bad as it gets. We have a Cricut machine which we use to cut out paper, cardboard and light plastic. I use it to build models. It makes very accurate cuts and can cut perfect circles. When I was working on a project with my daughter, I suddenly realized that the machine would be ideal for making gaskets, so I thought I'd give it a try. This is the machine. It's just really just a C and C machine and works cutting on two axis. I took what was left of the gasket to my Steering box and taped it to a sheet of paper. Then I scanned it and brought it into Adobe Illustrator and used it as a pattern to make the shape of the gasket. I set it up so I could cut two at a time, just in case. The artwork was saved as a PNG file with a transparent background. Then I put the files into the Cricut's software program and had it cut the gaskets. This is on cardstock, but it will cut gasket paper just as well. I was amazed at the fit. And the cuts are absolutely clean and flat. It's always great when a plan works out.
  2. I have quite a bit of side trim left over from my 50 Wayfarer Sportabout project. Some other parts, too. PM me with what you are looking for.
  3. My life has changed very little. I’m semi-retired and for the last five years my time was spent doing computer graphics and illustration in my home office or out in the garage working on my 32 Dodge Brothers sedan. We live in a small town in the middle of nowhere, have plenty of toilet paper at the local grocery store and count our blessings. Living in the boonies has certain advantages you don’t appreciate until something like this happens.
  4. I know nothing about OD units. I assume the rear case is the actual overdrive, just behind the actual trans case. I guess the OD case will not bolt up to your 33 trans case - that would be way too easy.
  5. Applying the rubber and final installation. I had the boards powder-coated black and sanded the upper surface for better glue adhesion..
  6. Here are some pics of the running-boards being fabricated. As I said before, not for the faint of heart. Not to say that a real master metal worker couldn't do it by hand, but this ended up being an exact duplicate of the original and they fit like a glove. The number of pieces was extraordinary.
  7. My 1932 Dodge Brothers has a device on the driver's side front spring mount that supposedly dampened the steering. As you can see in the photo, the drivers side looks totally different than the more conventional passenger side. The leaf spring on the driver's side is also shorter than the other front spring. This may be what's going on with your frame.
  8. Mine is probably different 😀 but I have detailed photos I’d be glad to post if you need them.
  9. I saw your photos of the installation of your engine and trans on Facebook. It looks great! Now I see why your Floating Power setup works with a different transmission - the trans mounts attach to the bellhousing. My 32 has a totally different setup which makes it impossible to do what you have done. Looks like my fussing and worrying was totally unfounded. Saner heads prevailed - as usual.
  10. I had new running boards made for my 32 Dodge Brothers DL. They look similar, if not identical, to your boards. To get them exact is not a job for the faint of heart, but it can be done.
  11. Just getting ready to do mine. All my rollers appear to be in good shape and the original fabric is still there, although very brittle and prone to cracking. So, the correct term is "no fray?" Do they usually have it in different colors? Thanks for posting this, I was at a loss after LB went under.
  12. Having made documentaries all my life, I can tell you people often don’t want personal information made public. I’m sure some of Wayne’s customers/clients request the details of their transactions not to be made public on the show. I, too, find it frustrating, often wondering just what the heck he paid for that car or motorcycle. He does tell you prices in all the auction segments, which are public anyway, so you get some idea what’s going on. And speaking of auctions, bidding was pretty flat on last night’s show. This virus isn’t going to help things, either.
  13. Did anyone catch tonight’s “Chasing Classic Cars?” Wayne was driving a 1932 Packard and in a traveling shot from the camera truck he was tooling down the road when the front driver’s side tire hit a big rut in the road. The front end immediately went into a classic death wobble as the car drove out of frame. It looked like he was lucky he didn’t lose control. They cut away fairly quickly, but the was no doubt the front end was all over the road.
  14. On my 32 DL there is a rubber pad on a crossmember just in front of the bellhousing, but the engine/trans is not attached to the pad, they just rest on it. There is a mount that attaches to the transmission near the rear of the transmission. This is a rubber mount. I see that your bellhousing has no “arms” to attach it to the frame, so your setup must be similar to mine. My car also has a half leaf spring that runs from the trans to the frame to prevent the motor/trans from twisting too much on the Floating Power rubber mounts. My concern is that if your front motor mount is the standard Floating Power rubber mount, then your rear trans mount has to incorporate an isolated rubber mount to make the system work. Mounting the trans solidly to a fabricated mount, even with rubber pads, may effect the front mount (it may be too flexible, or rip apart from the strain). Not trying to turn this into a downer, but from a long list of frustrations with Floating Power you may want to be careful with your rear mount setup. It certainly looks like you will need a shorter driveshaft depending on how far your free-wheeling unit (if you had one) stuck out of the back of the trans. Maybe you’ll be lucky and your original rear rubber mount will work on your new setup.
  15. Does the new trans clear the X-frame? How are you planning to mount the trans since the Floating Power setup will be different? Engine and trans looks terrific.
  16. They went from Model As to 34 Fords to Studebaker trucks.
  17. This is the type of buggy I rode in back in 1952 when we first visited Silver Lake. I took these shots a few years ago when they had the car out on display. These are screenshots from 8mm movies we took in the late fifties of our Ford dune buggy at our cottage. I thought it was a 37, but it was a 38 based on these pictures. Sorry for the poor quality, but you get the idea. Bus seats, no seatbelts, we drove around the dunes like maniacs - I guess I'm lucky to be alive. That's me waving from the front passenger seat in the third photo and my brother Bob behind me. Just what everyone wants to see - my old home movies.
  18. ‘These folks have run what we always called “dune buggies” for years on the dunes on Silver Lake in Michigan. They ran 34 Fords back in the early fifties when I was a kid. They only held five people and as business increased and the state restricted driving on the dunes, they switched to trucks with three or four rows of seats to take many more customers on each ride. We had two buggies ourselves, a 37 Ford phaeton and a 46 Mercury wagon. All the doors and roofs were removed and grab rails installed. The wheel rims were cut in half and a 12 band was welded in. The tires were stretched over these widened rims and run at about 8psi. Man, were those things fun! I learned to tear down a Ford flathead V8 working on our buggies - which broke down with amazing regularity. Our cottage was right on the lake with the dunes right behind us. Great memories.
  19. Ah, well, hopes dashed again. Time to go to the old standby - innovation. Let’s see if I can come up with some way to make three of these things.
  20. Gee, what a shock. Pretty much nothing fits from 31 or 33. Some mechanical stuff, but little things like this are always a no go. Is that 32 you found some parts foe me still around?
  21. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they look like. Thanks.
  22. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. Not sure what these are called, but they are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they look like. Thanks.
  23. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they look like. Thanks.
  24. From the side the car looks okay, but that front view is just plain ugly. The independent front suspension may be innovative, but the lack of visual frame rails makes it look like someone sawed off the front of the car. That, combined with a truly uninspired radiator shell, takes the front down to economy car status. Maybe a front bumper, if there was one, would help, but I doubt it. About the only attractive view of this car, in my opinion, is the rear, as I like the squat rear curve of the body and the supports for the trunk. Just my opinion and I’m sure many might disagree.