Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Boy, totally different than the Lovejoys on my 32 Dodge Brothers. I have a step by step in my thread, but it won’t help with your shocks.
  2. I wonder if the guys that built your two cars were still working in December 1931 when my car was put together - the first week of DL production. Were your cars built in Detroit?
  3. I'm taking apart the steering box on my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL. I have the housing and pinion shaft removed and there is plenty of lubrication inside and everything appears to be okay - although I won't know until I get things cleaned off. My question is about putting it back together once it's cleaned and painted. Do I have to mark the positions of the shafts (pinion shaft and steering shaft)? Or will it pretty much fall into place when I start to reassemble things? I'm at the point where I can identify the rotation of each shaft, but don't want to go any further until I can make sure this is necessary (or not). thanks for any advice and guidance. I'll post some pictures when I'm further along in my main thread.
  4. Thanks for asking, Ian. The day before I was to have the surgery, the hospital called and said they wouldn’t do the operation due to irregularities in my EKG - which I was required to have in advance. This has resulted in over a month of tests which ended up concluding my heart was okay considering my age. Now the surgery is scheduled for October first. It’s been a depressing and wasted summer, with little work being accomplished.
  5. Kudlos to the seller for listing a starting price with no reserve. The rat rod comment made me nauseous, but the rest of the description seems to lean toward restoration. Where did those Highlander door panels come from? And did Cord trunk lids fit that badly, or does it just need adjustment? Love the car but i’m too old and too broke to consider it.
  6. Taylormade

    technical

    My 32 DB definitely had a thin woven material between the frame and the front fenders. I replaced it during my ongoing restoration. I can post pix if it would help.
  7. I was hoping the shim idea might work. Good to see you got things working.
  8. https://www.vintagepowerwagons.com/online-parts-catalog Vintage Power Wagons - lots of engine and mechanical parts for cars. They are not military only, but you may have tp do some searching through the catalog to find what you need.
  9. Is there a twist in the shafts? Maybe you need to shim one of the mounts to get things working. It stands to reason that if you bolt things tight and they stop moving, you are putting a bend or twist into the shafts.
  10. Everyone has already answered, but yes, it’s Dodge Brothers 1932 DK sedan. It’s an eight cylinder while the DK is the six. You can tell the difference by the longer hood area between the louvres and the radiator shell and the slightly different bumpers - the DK is straight on the bottom and the DL is curved. The bodies are the same. My DL has “DL BLack” in chalk on the inside of the body next to the rear window.
  11. Well, the news just keeps getting worse. The day before the scheduled operation the hospital calls and says it’s a no-go as my electrocardiograph came back with irregularities. Now I have to go in for tests on August 7th. Very discouraging. I’d love to be talking restoration rather than medical problems, but I have no choice at the moment. I’m hoping to finish Daphne before I take the big dirt nap.
  12. I don’t disagree, but I think the issue is this dash was done by a purportedly top plater. It’s not top notch work, and Chris tech says they charged top dollar. Makes me wonder how they did it at the factory.
  13. Don’t kill the messenger, but some of those lines look a bit wavy and not evenly spaced. I know photographs tend to exaggerate certain features, and perhaps the factory jobs suffered from similar applications, but something doesn’t look right. Feel free to stone me if you don’t agree. Not trying to be overly critical, here, but this restoration is as close to perfect as any I have seen.
  14. Those are Tryon shackles, similar to the ones on my 32 Dodge Brothers DL sedan. The large “washer” on the bolt adjusts the tension holding the two side pieces in place. It’s not necessary to remove the grease fittings.
  15. Two arms is a different beast. I’m sure my procedure would not work on your shocks. Mine are single arm, single action Lovejoys.
  16. You’ll find the original the day after you find and buy a replacement. With the help of my ever patient wife, we inventoried every part for my 32DL, made a detailed list and packed everything in plastic containers. It all started when I couldn’t find one of my metal ribbed headlight connectors. As we went through everything, it still wasn’t showing up. Then I pulled out each empty shelf and there it was resting on the edge of the concrete garage foundation. It had fallen off the back of one of the shelves. I hope you have success - believe me, I feel your pain!
  17. Wow, I didn’t know they still had wood sills in 34. My 32DL has wooden floors, but the sills are metal and integral with the body. I do have a sill like assembly around the top of the tool box.
  18. If the shaft on that shock is still good, you can rebuild it yourself for a few bucks. Even if the shaft is bad, you can still do it with a sleeve. Detailed explanation in my thread The Resurrection Of Daphne.
  19. Not doubting you - my old eyes are going bad - but where are you seeing overspray? From the pictures, or have you made a personal visit to see the car?
  20. He’s a dealer near me. He’ll probably hold out for the higher number based on previous discussions with him on other cars. With any dealer, you’re paying for the car and the dealer’s overhead. Not faulting or complaining, as a good dealer will back his cars and give the buyer a bit of security you might not get from a private purchase. Note I said good dealers. I’m not real comfortable with the lower section of this car. The reflections off the fender do not match with those of the door. Seems a bit wavy, but maybe it’s just me.
  21. The early 49 models had side curtains. They changed to roll up during the 49 Model year and stayed with that configuration until the end of the run. I had one. It ran but turned out to be a total rust bucket. The inner rockers - the backbone of the body - were virtually rusted away, as was most of the front floor. I found 4 NOS fenders for it and started the restoration. Then I found the the frame - unique to the convertible - was rusted badly. I could punch holes in the frame with the jab of a screwdriver. To add to the problem, the Wayfarer frames are short wheelbase, hard to find. After I added up the cost of chrome, paint, interior, top, tires, mechanical work and my labor - and found three nice ones for sale in the 20 to 25K range - I gave up and sold it, taking a $500 loss. (I was very lucky!). And the cars for sale took a long, long time to sell. I know one went for $16,000 and was a good solid car. A good sheet metal man who can weld and lay a good coat of paint could have had fun with it, I guess, but it was beyond my capabilities. In a stroke of irony, I sold that car plus my 48 Plymouth to purchase my 32 Dodge Brothers sedan - the first car I ever owned, the actual car. I probably have more time and money in it now than I would have had if I’d continued with the Wayfarer, but I’m enjoying this ride a lot more. Restoring something you love that is part of your past makes it worth it - at least to me.
  22. Lots of changes between 31 and 34. For instance, my 32 still has Babbitt bearings but I believe Chrysler products of the same year use insert bearings.
  23. My flat floorboards are all wood, but I have a two piece toe-board that is made of metal. I guess they went to all metal floors a year later with the 33s.
  24. Amazing to see the change in a single year. My 32 has no arms sticking out due to the then new Floating Power mounting system. How many times I wished I could just pull my transmission without taking half my car apart.