Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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48 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

I’m not sure what a bonded seal washer is.  My ignorance is showing.  Inquiring minds want to know.

I was thinking....you and me both, brother! First time I have ever heard of them. I like them already.

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On an oil pan, the oil would still come out between the pan and block if the pan top wasn't perfectly flat against the block and the gasket wasn't 100%.

 

My first thought was the differential rear cover. Mine leaks very slightly at the bottom (along the bolt I think).

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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Man, don't we learn some stuff here.

Thanks Ray. Having had a look around, I now not only know about Bonded Washers but also Self Centering Bonded Washers, neither of which I had heard of before.

But will I remember next time I need them???????

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Nothing but metric sizes that I can find.  I’ll have to mic the bolt and see if I can find something close.  I wonder if a copper compression washer would do the job?  It states in the literature that the bonded seals were designed to replace compression washers.

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Sealer on the threads should do it. The sealing washers as another back up.

Chrysler among others tap holes thru to oil and cooling in many places.

I resealed the exhaust manifold studs twice on the last early Hemi that I built. (three time including the initial assembly) It took some Silver Seal to finally stop the coolant weeping.

The thing spit out a couple of core plugs too, a bad design those ones that are just a flat piece with the dish shape. I am afraid to smack them hard enough to seal.

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Looks like McMaster-Carr has these washers in two different types.  My bolt is a 5/16 with a shaft diameter of .310.  It seems either of these washers would work for my purposes.  Shipping will probably be more expensive than the washers themselves.  They're not exactly the same as the British/Australian units, but it appears they do the same job.

 

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CAN YOU TELL ME, how many transmission mount bushings are there? I have a 33 and only see one bushing under the tail of my transmission. I can not seem to find a replacement bushing and it seems there is only 1 bushing, can someone advise on if there are more I am not seeing? 

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I’m not sure if the 33 Floating Power setup is the same as my 32 - for your sake I hope not.  There is a photo of the rear of my transmission (actually the free wheeling extension of the tranny) on page 52 of this thread.  Are you calling the rubber Floating Power mount a bushing?  If that is the case my rear rubber mount is attached to the free wheeling case by four bolts, two on each side, and attached to the removable frame cross member by two bolts.  The only way to get it off is to remove the transmission by unbolting the bolts on the bellhousing and the four bolts that hold on the cross member.  Be sure to support the rear of the engine at the bellhousing so that you don’t crush the rubber pad on the removable cross support.  There are detailed photos of all this earlier in this thread.  If you could post a shot or two of your transmission, I can tell you if you have the same setup. 

 

My my car has only one rubber support at the rear of the transmission..  Then and Now Automotive can revulcanize your mounts.  They did all three of mine.   This is also discussed and illustrated earlier in this thread.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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My sealing washers arrived and I installed one on the shaft clamp bolt on my transmission.  Since I can fill the transmission without reinstalling the freewheeling extension, I filled the transmission case and moved on to other projects.  I’ll see if any leaks develope over the next few weeks.  If all goes well, I’ll put everything back together - hopefully for the final time.

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As I'm repairing my transmission leak, crawling under the car, I noticed many of the bare metal parts I had painted clear were rusty as all get out.  Either i forgot to paint some of this stuff, or the paint did a crummy job of protecting things.  Take the freewheeling lever, for instance.  This was shiny and bright last fall.

 

IMG_0753.jpg.f2b3cd655006cbc89cd2114e98c91094.jpg

 

So I painted it and many other small parts around the transmission.  Maybe not totally original, but pretty maintenance free.

 

IMG_0756.jpg.cf1861732f409a650ab2031bfa642787.jpg

 

I also got my headlight reflectors back from the re-silvering company.  They look good, but are really hard to photograph.

 

IMG_0761.jpg.069a4fc0e3a827881c0eab577d8fbadd.jpg

 

Nothing leaking from the tranny, so far.

 

 

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On 6/4/2018 at 5:58 PM, Sactownog said:

CAN YOU TELL ME, how many transmission mount bushings are there? I have a 33 and only see one bushing under the tail of my transmission. I can not seem to find a replacement bushing and it seems there is only 1 bushing, can someone advise on if there are more I am not seeing? 

 

Not sure if the 33 is the same as a 32, but I'm sure they're similar.  Here is a diagram of how the system works -

 

0-HS932_003DG-1-copy.jpg.b7ac4da84a22a863faeaf49272932b3a.jpg

 

The front mount is two pieces of steel with a vulcanized rubber center (right red circle.)  The mount sits up high on a stamped steel support bolted to the frame.

 

The center rubber mount (the rectangular object) is a simple block of rubber vulcanized to a steel plate that bolts onto the cross-member (visible under it.)  This cross-member is removable and has to come off to remove the oil pan.  The bellhousing simply rests on the block and is not attached to it.

 

The rear mount (left red circle) bolts to the transmission through the four holes up top, and to a removable cross support with nuts and bolts through the bottom two holes.  If the rubber mounts have deteriorated, you may have transmission problems if the motor is flopping all over the place.

 

Note the end of a spring, just visible behind the center rubber block.  This attaches between the bell-housing and the frame and keeps the motor from torquing too far on the rubber mounts.

 

The front mount before and after:

 

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29.thumb.JPG.67a38968a826223dd9dfdc2315f47da0.JPG

 

The center pad before and after:

 

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And the rear mount before and after:

 

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I hope this makes things a bit clearer.

 

 

 

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I finally got everything back together again.  So far, no leaks, but I'm done if something reappears.  The final solution - a large pan under the car.

 

Just taking the free-wheeling unit off made the job much easier, but it was still a pain with the body on the frame.  New gaskets, paint on the fasteners and some retouching on the paint and she's ready to go.  Spent the morning cutting and buffing the dash, getting ready to get the instruments back in.  Now that the trans is back in and the motor, transmission is properly supported, I can finally attempt to start the motor for the first time.  I think I mentioned I was going to do that about 8 months ago, but it proved to be another flight a fancy, with winter and a knee operation getting in the way.  Hopefully it will happen within the next two weeks.

 

Trans before and after...

 

IMG_0806.thumb.jpg.a8ba937ef1deb23d68a1e6fb72c25d42.jpg

 

IMG_0840.thumb.jpg.52fcb635efbe4517808d3614d257468a.jpg

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I can identify with your pain. I too dislike the oil drips. I use cardboard boxes, big ones - TV, fridge, washing machine, PV panel, whatever - they soak up the oil ... and when one is dirty,  fire works.

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Filled the radiator today, seeing if any leaks develop before the first startup.  I looked around for the classic green AIT formula and discovered that the local NAPA had about 15 cases of the stuff sitting on the floor against the back wall.  They said they stock it for local farmers.  The container proudly displays “SAFE FOR ALL CARS MANUFACTURED BEFORE 1988.”  Mixed it with distilled water.  Now, I just have to get the coil hooked up and she’ll be ready to fire.

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On 6/4/2018 at 6:58 PM, Sactownog said:

CAN YOU TELL ME, how many transmission mount bushings are there? I have a 33 and only see one bushing under the tail of my transmission. I can not seem to find a replacement bushing and it seems there is only 1 bushing, can someone advise on if there are more I am not seeing? 

Does it look like this

70883DB8-4744-490E-B1BA-FAA435DB0ECA.jpeg

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I'm starting to think my car may be better suited to a museum rather than driving it on the road.  I filled up the radiator the other day and came out to the garage this morning to discover water on the garage floor.  At first I thought the lower radiator hose clamps weren't  tight enough, so I tightened them up and wiped all the excess water away.  That's when I discovered it wasn't a leaky hose connection, but a problem with the radiator itself.  My old radiator was toast and I found a good one (I thought) at Hershey.  When I got it home, I took it to a radiator shop and had it cleaned and checked.  They said everything was A-Okay.  It turns out everything isn't A-Okay and the water is coming from a pinhole in the lower radiator fitting connection.   You can see it in the photo below.  If you wide it away, the tiny bubble forms within a few seconds

 

IMG_0859.thumb.JPG.76f72a3887e1063e9c10ebccceefc0b9.JPG

 

Naturally, I have the radiator on the car, with the shell attached, hoses attached - the works.  I am assuming that some sort of solder repair is the fix for this situation, but I'm no expert.  If soldering would fix it, I'm trying to figure out if it could be done with the radiator in place.  I'd obviously have to remove the hoses and put some sort of heat shield around the fitting so I don't un-solder it from the radiator, but there is enough room to work on it.  Another option might be JB Weld, but I'm not sure if it would work in this situation.  If I cleaned the area thoroughly, made sure it was completely dry, and covered it with the JB do you think it would hold?  We are talking about hot water here.  The good news is that this isn't a pressurized system, so there won't be that much stress on the repair.

 

Any thoughts appreciated.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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