Dynaflash8

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Dynaflash8 last won the day on December 20 2016

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About Dynaflash8

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    '39 Buick Team Member
  • Birthday 10/19/1938

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  • Biography
    Served 15 years on AACA Board, National President 2005

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  1. Top Speed for '39 Special all standard

    Okay, agree with all. By the way Matt, that test '41 Century probably had the all-metal high compression head gasket too. Most of those are long gone now and replaced by the .050 head gasket, and that reduces compression. A late friend of mine, a retired line mechanic, was always wanting those metal head gaskets for his '41 Century just in case he needed one to boost the umpf of his car. He liked fast Buicks.
  2. 1969 Buick Dealer Album Color & Trim Book

    SOLD TO AUSTRALIA. USA, YOU SNOOZE YOU LOSE.
  3. Top Speed for '39 Special all standard

    Well Matt, it sounds like you questioning my verascity (spelling). I know what I saw. Of course, the speedometer may have been off, and too, I was seeing it from the far right seat. Even as a kid in 1947 I never forgot the experience. It was burned into my memory. The car did throw a rod, but that was in 1952-53 after Dad turned it in on a 1951 Plymouth. I learned to drive in that Plymouth...ugh! By the way, my blue '39 sedan has the optional 3.9-1 gears and I've had it at 80 more than once I think. The speedometer needle hangs up at just over 70 and I have to tap on the glass to get it to drop back to zero. Needless to say, not often, but I have run it 70 many times. This car also has insert rod bearings since I rebuilt it in '65. We were on a tour to Williams Grove 10-15 years ago with the yellow four-door convertible. On the track I got it up to 85 for a very short time, and I think it has the 4.44 to 1 gears, but I really don't know. I backed it off immediately because it still has babbitt bearings. Typically I run the yellow car 55-60. Again, who knows if the speedometer is right.
  4. 1941 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Sedan

    I had one of these, mine with skirts and all four bumper accessory ends. I sold it the first time CCCA turned it down as a Full Classic....shouldna done that! So now I have a '41 Roadmaster 4-door sedan which also will have skirts and a full set of accessory bumper ends. The sedan makes my wife very happy, but the convertible made me happy. We want this last collector car to be one of our tour cars.....hence closed is best.
  5. Top Speed for '39 Special all standard

    Who knows. I do remember the hood was off and two boys were in it. It couldn't pass us. My Dad finally gave into my Mom's loud demands to "quit it, Earl, have you lost your mind?" haha
  6. I have just re-listed a 1969 Buick Dealer Album on eBay at a very fair price. Bidding starts at $75. But, you can buy it now for $115. If you have a 1969 Buick, take a look at this listing.
  7. Top Speed for '39 Special all standard

    When I was ten years old, my father got into a race with a hoped up 37-38 Chevy hotrod. The speedometer on my parents' '39 Buick Special was bouncing between 100 and 105. He finally let off and let the Chevy go. A friend of theirs was following in a 1939 Packard 120 and couldn't keep up. This is one of my memories that is etched into my mind. The fastest I ever drove the blue car at left is around 75 mph, but I have a 3.9-1 optional rear from a Century in this car. This is not a faulty childhood memory, but just one of my memories that served to make me love 1939 Buick Special's. I've had 11 Specials and 1 Century in my life. I will also add that a 1939 Buick Century coupe won the first-ever recognized stock car race held at Langhorne Speedway outside of Philadelphia in 1939. The driver was Mark Light, of Reading, PA, who ran out of gas on the final lap. At first they said he didn't finish the race and it was won by Bill Swope of York, PA driving a 1939 Buick Special convertible. Later they recalculated the laps and found that Light had, in fact, finished. In that same race was Ted Nugent who later owned the car that won the 1950 Indianapolis race. He was driving an Oldsmobile. Joey Chitwood finished way back, driving a Ford, and Henry Banks also finished way back in a 1938 Buick. See the story in Special Interest Autos magazine #2. I wrote it the article, and I'm quoting particulars from distant memory.
  8. Oil Filter advice needed

    I want to thank everyone on this thread who have helped me come up with the right number, readily available, oil filter for my '41 Buick. This is a great site.
  9. 1939 Buick Showroom Trim/Upholstery Album (Original)

    Yes Matt, I agree, except the 1939 Buick 40-60 series is my favorite car of all time. I've been spending gobs of money on my new toy, a '41 Roadmaster, but my wife encouraged me to go ahead and buy this book. However, it is up for auction not buy it now. So, I'll hold my powder dry for now and see what happens. Although I've looked for one of these books for almost 50 years, I've also gotten along quite well without one. Both of my cars have gone to the top of the AACA judging awards long ago and are starting over the other side of the hill, just like I am.
  10. Oil Filter advice needed

    Yes, in fact that rings a bell...................I think that is the number I used when I had my 41 Roadmaster convertible sedan. NAPA stores are local here. Thanks a million. We're working through my Roadmaster now. All of the ancient heater hoses are off for replacement. I decided to put on all new radiator hoses while the anti-freeze was drained, and then install fresh anti-freeze. I decided, also, to put on a new fan belt and install a five-blade fan that I purchased at Hershey.
  11. 1939 Buick Showroom Trim/Upholstery Album (Original)

    I saw this book in Lewis Jenkins' office in 2000 when I repurchased my 1939 Buick convertible sedan from him. That is, unless he had two of them. I always thought he got it from Richard Boyer, Skip's late father. That is because after Richard passed, Skip could never find it, but I saw that one in Richard Boyer's family room at a Buick club meeting. Lewis Jenkins wouldn't sell it. As I recall, it was pretty weathered. Doesn't anybody on this website want a very nice 1969 Dealer Album? I have a real nice one that not one person has looked at on this site, and nobody bid on it when it was on eBay. I'm wondering how many people know what a Dealer Album is.
  12. I.D. this part for 1938-1939 Buicks

    That is a torque ball seal gasket and it fits all the way up through 1947. It does not fit a 1939 Buick 40-60 model. I would have to go look at my Master Parts Book, but off the top of my head, I think it fits 1940-1947. I would be HAPPY to buy one or all of them. Please contact me. Earl Beauchamp
  13. 1949 Buick special 05 paint code I.D

    Molly, Yes, that is a different picture for sure. That is a Model 41. The firewall plate should read Model 41. The engine from a 1950 Buick SPECIAL will enterchange. In addition the 1950 Series 40 engine is a 248 cid engine with insert rod bearings. I'm not sure your car has insert rod bearings. The Super changed over in mid-1949 but I don't think the Special did. If that is a 1949 it is very rare, although not as rare as a 1946 Series 41. There were quite a few of them built in 1947 and 1948. 1948 had the belt moldings and plastic insert on the nose emblem, while the 1947 has a metal insert in the nose emblem and no belt moldings. You can't tell a 1948 from a 1949 by just looking at the car from five feet away. I've owned a 1947 and a 1948 Series 41 in the past. With optional fender skirts they are really good looking. (my opinion)
  14. 1949 Buick special 05 paint code I.D

    Molly, Yes, that is a different picture for sure. That is a Model 41. The firewall plate should read Model 41. The engine from a 1950 Buick SPECIAL will enterchange. In addition the 1950 Series 40 engine is a 248 cid engine with insert rod bearings. I'm not sure your car has insert rod bearings. The Super changed over in mid-1949 but I don't think the Special did. If that is a 1949 it is very rare, although not as rare as a 1946 Series 41. There were quite a few of them built in 1947 and 1948. 1948 had the belt moldings and plastic insert on the nose emblem, while the 1947 has a metal insert in the nose emblem and no belt moldings. You can't tell a 1948 from a 1949 by just looking at the car from five feet away. I've owned a 1947 and a 1948 Series 41 in the past. With optional fender skirts they are really good looking. (my opinion) Looking at the screws on the firewall plate, I believe it is from another car. That's a bad thing, because you will never know what body number it was among the 5,000+ Specials built from late 1948 to around March-May 1949.
  15. I have a very nice 1969 Buick Color & Trim Book that I've been trying to sell on eBay with no luck. For me, and maybe I'm strange, next to a Master Parts Book, nothing is more exciting to find than a Dealer Album (i.e. Color & Trim Book). I've been looking for one of those that I could buy for a 1939 Buick for around 50 years. Yet, nobody seems to want this one. It is like a loose leaf binder with about six rings. Two of the rings are broken, but it is otherwise in very nice condition with paint swatches and upholstery material swatches. It also identifies which upholstery and/or which colors go with which, including the vinyl top and/or convertible top colors. I want $100 plus postage. The thing is 7 inches thick, so it will take a large flat rate box. I also have a 1969 Accessory pamphlet which shows the various small accessories available from the dealer for $10.