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1988 Buick Riviera T-type antilock brake booster problem


Eddozar
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lost my brakes, the pedal went to the floor, I replaced the high pressure accumulator but it did not help. Does anyone have one for sale or

is there a place that someone can recommendo to buy one?.

Do I need to bleed the brakes for the accumulator to work ??,

 

I included a stock picture of the unit in my 1988 buick riviera 2 door sedan T-type

 

I was thinking of replacing that unit for a regular booster and a regular master cilynder brake and just leave the electrical lines disconected

and just be a mechanical unit like other buicks. can you guys comment on this thought. Thanks

1111111.JPG

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Did you make sure there was not a rusted line with fluid loss?

 

Do you have a shop manual for the car?

 

In general, plug the output fittings of the master cylinder and bleed it to get a hard pedal, then connect the lines of the car. Shop manual will have specifics of bleeding the master with an accumulator on it.

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Here are some of my thoughts and experience.  I had the same braking system on my 1988 olds Toronado trofeo, the optional Teves system was super advanced system that was dangerous on two levels, first this car could stop on a dime and give five cents change which sounds great except if you do, look in the rear view mirror as no one behind you can stop as quick as you can.  Road and track tested this car and at 60 mph the car could stop in 140’, the other reason it is dangerous is what happened to your car, sudden component failure.  This was a very rare option in riviera and Toronado as it was only available in high trim levels and you still had to check the $800.00 option button when ordering.  I know because I ordered my car new in 1988, 

  Please do not fool around on this unit without shop book, it is way to complicated, the possibilities of being injured by the accumulation of pressure in the system along with burning up your wiring, back feeding and shorting out one of the absolute impossible to obtain body computers is real, not to mention your life and others on the road.  A few ideas for you is to check out a couple of the Cadillac Allante web sites like the one Tom Rhonert maintains, the reason is every Allante made from 1986 to 1992 had this system, so not only many of the parts are the same, but for most it’s “not their first rodeo”.  The Toronado club might be another option because that club is pretty active in keeping their cars on the road and are helpful.  Another option you might have is Jaguar used this system from 1986 to 1989? And may have some major components that could interchange.

  Last piece of advice, do not gut the system and try to convert it back to standard brakes, not only will you lose antilock which is really important in that car as it is heavy in the front and extremely light in the back, you will also have Christmas tree lights in your dashboard alerting you to all kinds of brake pressure, brake antilock and brake failure that you will not be able to stop as the BCM (body control Module) needs certain inputs that you will not be able to duplicate.  If you get system running change fluid every year, might be overkill but that is how I kept my system running for 200,000 miles

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10 hours ago, Eddozar said:

lost my brakes, the pedal went to the floor, I replaced the high pressure accumulator but it did not help. Does anyone have one for sale or

is there a place that someone can recommendo to buy one?.

Do I need to bleed the brakes for the accumulator to work ??,

 

I included a stock picture of the unit in my 1988 buick riviera 2 door sedan T-type

 

I was thinking of replacing that unit for a regular booster and a regular master cilynder brake and just leave the electrical lines disconected

and just be a mechanical unit like other buicks. can you guys comment on this thought. Thanks

1111111.JPG

Go to the Reatta page on this web site as all Reattas from 1988-1990 had this system. 

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13 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Did you make sure there was not a rusted line with fluid loss?

 

Do you have a shop manual for the car?

 

In general, plug the output fittings of the master cylinder and bleed it to get a hard pedal, then connect the lines of the car. Shop manual will have specifics of bleeding the master with an accumulator on it.

Thank you, I was going to bleed at the tires and never thought about the master cylinder bleeding so thanks for the tip, I will do it and we'll se what happen.

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6 hours ago, ramair said:

Here are some of my thoughts and experience.  I had the same braking system on my 1988 olds Toronado trofeo, the optional Teves system was super advanced system that was dangerous on two levels, first this car could stop on a dime and give five cents change which sounds great except if you do, look in the rear view mirror as no one behind you can stop as quick as you can.  Road and track tested this car and at 60 mph the car could stop in 140’, the other reason it is dangerous is what happened to your car, sudden component failure.  This was a very rare option in riviera and Toronado as it was only available in high trim levels and you still had to check the $800.00 option button when ordering.  I know because I ordered my car new in 1988, 

  Please do not fool around on this unit without shop book, it is way to complicated, the possibilities of being injured by the accumulation of pressure in the system along with burning up your wiring, back feeding and shorting out one of the absolute impossible to obtain body computers is real, not to mention your life and others on the road.  A few ideas for you is to check out a couple of the Cadillac Allante web sites like the one Tom Rhonert maintains, the reason is every Allante made from 1986 to 1992 had this system, so not only many of the parts are the same, but for most it’s “not their first rodeo”.  The Toronado club might be another option because that club is pretty active in keeping their cars on the road and are helpful.  Another option you might have is Jaguar used this system from 1986 to 1989? And may have some major components that could interchange.

  Last piece of advice, do not gut the system and try to convert it back to standard brakes, not only will you lose antilock which is really important in that car as it is heavy in the front and extremely light in the back, you will also have Christmas tree lights in your dashboard alerting you to all kinds of brake pressure, brake antilock and brake failure that you will not be able to stop as the BCM (body control Module) needs certain inputs that you will not be able to duplicate.  If you get system running change fluid every year, might be overkill but that is how I kept my system running for 200,000 miles

Thanks for your great input I wish I had your knowledge.  yeah this car was amazing since we bought it brand new, one owner, us; This buick, solid, powerful with amazing electronics was way ahead of its time when designed. Yeah I am trying to go the safest way to fix it since its no fun the pedal going to the floor on you. I am 66 yrs old now and I just drive it to the supermarket and the theather and the beach once in a while so if I can't get this brake unit overhaul or find me a good replacement; the Christmas lights in June, would cheer me up a little I would say. jajaja

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All 1988-1990 Reattas had the system as standard equipment....... lots of good information on the Reatta forum. 

Since you have changed the accumulator, hopefully with a good one, the next step is to verify the pump motor is working. 

run 12v directly to it. 

With a working pump, and a good accumulator, that usually leaves to pressure switch or relay for the motor. 

Flushing the brake system is cheap insurance against other system problems.

The Teves system was state of the art when used on your car.  The master cylinder and booster rarely fail but it never hurts to have a spare on the shelf. 

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7 hours ago, Barney Eaton said:

All 1988-1990 Reattas had the system as standard equipment....... lots of good information on the Reatta forum. 

Since you have changed the accumulator, hopefully with a good one, the next step is to verify the pump motor is working. 

run 12v directly to it. 

With a working pump, and a good accumulator, that usually leaves to pressure switch or relay for the motor. 

Flushing the brake system is cheap insurance against other system problems.

The Teves system was state of the art when used on your car.  The master cylinder and booster rarely fail but it never hurts to have a spare on the shelf. 

trying to fix this problem I did purchase a accumulator but still did not pick up any pedall pressure, I am going to put 12v to the pump motor as you mention if I can figure out which unit is that one, Lol  and as for the pressure switch and the relay I am going to need to get me a book to tell me what they are.

I found a rebuilt unit but it will cost me about $1200 total so I am looking at all options, even replacing for a regular booster and master cylinder. 

Thanks for you input.

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Don't buy a rebuilt unit, you probably don't need one. Go to the "Reatta Owners Journal and along the top of the page you will see "How To" click on that and you will read on how to flush and bleed your brakes as well as how to test for the issue you are dealing with.

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