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1953 Dodge Meadowbrook


Crisjr14
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I recently bought this 1953 Dodge Meadowbrook  I am looking for some help out there with this situation I am having i am thinking that i might have to rebuild the carburetors they are carter ball and ball single one is a D6G1 the other is a DTC1 i was doing some research and found out something that might be bad so I am asking if anyone can help with pictures or links on how to rebuild those carbs as well my '53 has a OD handle but was told that it was disconnected at one point and does not need it but from what I seen on posts that the OD cable gets hooked up to one of the carburetor and how can I find out what transmission I have and what type of fluid to I need to use please any pictures or links to help me out please

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That is an interesting aftermarket intake, is it an Edmunds? I see some writing between the carbs but can't make it out.

If you can get under the car and get pictures of the transmission we can soon tell you what it is. There were 3 or 4 different trans combinations that year.

For best performance you need a matched pair of carbs. The Carbking who posts on this site can probably help you out.

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On 12/24/2020 at 9:17 AM, Crisjr14 said:

my '53 has a OD handle but was told that it was disconnected at one point and does not need it but from what I seen on posts that the OD cable gets hooked up to one of the carburetor

The cable under the dash that typically says "Overdrive" or "OD" is NOT connected to the carburetor!! 

That cable goes to the transmission and connects to a lever which locks out the freewheeling clutch. 

The only cables at the carburetor(s) would be the manual choke and in some cars perhaps a throttle

Cars from the 50s use throttle linkage (not cables) which yours seems to have. 

 

On overdrive equipped cars there IS an electrical switch (Kickdown switch) that is activated at full throttle. (this might be the overdrive component that someone was trying to describe to you)

In early 1950s cars this switch is typically through the floorboard under the gas pedal.  Some makes & models have the switch under the hood and is tripped by the throttle linkage. 

 

Your car has a dual carb conversion. I dont see any kickdown switch on the linkage, but my suggestion is to not worry about the overdrive until you get the carbs adjusted and the car running and functioning properly. 

 

Old car suggestion - concentrate on fixing just one thing at a time. 

 

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Thank you for the insight and yeah I am going to start to slow my pace on the car as I have found myself trying to get everything done at once and really have to focus like you said one thing at a time but I appreciate all the advise again I will keep you all posted as to where I am 

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6 minutes ago, Crisjr14 said:

I have found myself trying to get everything done at once and really have to focus like you said one thing at a time

 

Welcome to the old car hobby. If you have not yet discovered, they are NEVER fixed as quickly and as easily as on those dumb TV shows.  Tasks you think might take a single weekend, can sometimes last for months. 

Just take it slow or you will lose your patience very fast. 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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The Motors Repair Manuals are a great source for detailed rebuild information on most US based vehicles. I used mine extensively when rebuilding a 1947 Buick Carter carburettor. If the carburettors retain their original tags it should be easy enough to identify the year etc and specs.

 

 Unfortunately my edition stops at 1949 but does give detail on the Carter Ball and Ball. My next edition starts at 1962.
 

Certainly worth investing in one.

jmtbw Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

 

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Edited by rodneybeauchamp
Incorrect photo (see edit history)
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You'll find a wealth of information on this website https://p15-d24.com/

There is also a blog there called "Keeping up with the AOK Boys" Within that blog is a 4 part section on aftermarket dual carb manifolds. You can find and identify yours there.

The gentleman who authored that blog is very knowledgeable about those manifolds....they are in the process of manufacturing an improved version right now. 

As a previous poster mentioned, you need to have two carbs that are exactly the same, and then have them tuned exactly alike as well.

 

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Ok Gentlemen have another favor to asking any one can help me out I got the carburetor kits put in the '53 only problem is the carburetor mounting gasket where the carbs sit on the intake the gaskets came to thin in the kits and no auto parts can give me the specs on thickness and I dont want to order them and be wrong so my question is this is there anyone can tell me what mounting gasket I need as to part # the ones I took off I put back on and I am leaking gas like crazy between the intake and carburetors they are carter ball and ball downdrafts DTC1 and D6G1 the old ones are about 3mm thick and they look like the ones that have like metal in the material in other words really stiff and sturdy material also they gotta have these notches on the inside please any part # or where I can order them I would greatly app it thank you for taking your time to read and respond 

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5 hours ago, Crisjr14 said:

I am leaking gas like crazy between the intake and carburetors

Yikes!   You have gas flowing freely from between the base of the carbs and the intake manifold???

Perhaps gas is running down from the top of the float bowl and on to manifold(?) That's not good but is fixable.

If the carb base gaskets are "leaking" they cause a vacuum leak, NOT fuel leak.

If fuel is really leaking from where you describe, you have a big problem.

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