WPVT

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About WPVT

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  1. WPVT

    Fabric top

    I'll take some next week and post them. That's the least I can do considering all the help I've received.
  2. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks for everybody's input, especially trimacar and pfitz. The job is complete and I don't think it looks too shabby. The vinyl is tight as an eel's skin. The "hidem" welt is aptly named. Mine is hiding a lot of staples and not a few staple holes. The stuff I used was 3/4" wide, and I'm glad it was. It was tricky keeping the staples in their "lane" without x-ray vision to see the edge of the wood frame. I ended up using acrylic felt for padding, just one layer. It was very easy to stretch and conform to the corner shape which gave me a nice smooth surface to lay the vinyl. The vinyl I used was a 54" wide matte black "Champion" pebble finish, a good match for the original. Very different in appearance than the short or long cobra material. Nice soft black with no shine. Again, thanks to everyone for their advice and comments.
  3. WPVT

    Fabric top

    I may have misspoken. The "hidem" type welt that was originally used on my truck has two cords in it that make the beads appear a little "plumper" . The same as you would have on an upholstery welt. I think wire-on or windlace is something else. The original is also 5/8" wide, not the 3/4" that seems to be more available. I'm looking for a pretty subtle pebble grain, nothing as bold as the short or long cobra I've seen pictures of.
  4. WPVT

    Fabric top

    I just received some "hidem" welt for this project. It looks fine but it lacks the wires that were in the original. Does it matter, and if so, is there someone making the welt with wires in it ?
  5. WPVT

    Fabric top

    My thanks to both of you. It's plain to see you've done this before. I'll try again with the material I have. I'm extra glad this process didn't involve gluing anything down. Once I succeed, (and I will), I'll give a synopsis of what worked. I think that's helpful to have in the online database for when others start searching. Thanks again.
  6. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks Paul. I went ahead and made a first attempt. Basically I followed a sequence like you are describing. The front of the roof is straight, so I stapled that down with the straight cut on the vinyl. Then I went around to the back and started in the middle working outward towards the sides.I ended up with a nice flt smooth surface on the top, with the two sides and the corners still to go. Then I started in the middle of each side pulling down and towards the corners to get the vinyl tight. To make a long story short, I got a flat unwrinkled top, but all of my slack ended up at the corners, the result of my pulling down and towards the corners. To get rid of that many "pleats", I'd have to pull down on the corners more than is realistic. So I am going to have to try again. The roof is somewhat wedged shape, as well as having rounded corners, so that wedge shape needs to be accommodated, as well as the corners. I'm wondering if pulling towards the corners is my mistake. Maybe I overdid it. I know there is probably a certain amount of finesse involved. I may need to buy more vinyl and start over.
  7. WPVT

    Fabric top

    I covered the entire wood top with an acrylic felt. It smoothed out small imperfections well and stretched nicely at the corners. So now I'm satisfied that I have a good substrate on which to lay the vinyl. I'm wondering what sort of a sequence to follow, i.e., whether to go front to back, which is pretty straightforward and then do the sides, or start at four compass points and keep going around ? The rear rounded corners will require the most stretching to cover smoothly. Should they be done first or last ?
  8. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks Rusty. That makes sense.
  9. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks Paul. You read and understood the situation perfectly. I'll move forward keeping your advice in mind.
  10. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks. I've got the spray adhesive and used it to hold down the poly padding I tried and rejected. Handy stuff. I realize now that I am not clear on the purpose of the padding. Is it to try and keep the vinyl tight in the center of the roof ? Over plywood I can't see it having much soundproofing or insulating properties. Maybe it was habit from carriage building days. The jute that was in there used to be common stuff, but now not so much. It appears, though I'm not positive, that it only covered the flat plywood area, not wrapping down onto the corners. In that case, I'd need a material that I can taper off, so the edge won't show up under the vinyl. Anyway, I think of the top as being somewhat rigid, not like a cushion, so that's what I am trying to achieve. As ever, thankful for experienced advice.
  11. WPVT

    Fabric top

    Thanks. I was hoping you would respond to this post. Does this mean that the vinyl would not be cemented down, just heated, stretched and tacked ? I'm certainly more comfortable with that since it's easier to undo mistakes.
  12. WPVT

    Fabric top

    I'm moving ahead slowly. I've replaced the original 1/4" plywood so I am ready for fabric now. I found a nice supple matte finish black vinyl that I like by Champion, that's nearly identical to the original. Under the original fabric was a layer of what looks like jute or cotton waste. Not very thick, less than 1/4" in its compressed state. It seems like I should have something under the fabric so imperfections in the surface won't telegraph through the vinyl. The new "jute" I saw available was the same as carpet underlayment. A little too stiff for my use. So I got some 1/2" poly batting and cemented that down. I laid the vinyl on top just to see what it would look like. Way too puffy. I don't really want a cushioned top. Should I be trying to get the wood surfaces good enough to cover with vinyl directly and cement it down ? Or look for a thinner underlayment of some sort ? I'm a pretty careful craftsman, but this sort of work is new to me, and I want to get it right.
  13. For what my opinion is worth, and without meaning to offend anyone, the notion of "flipping" cars has gone a long way in bringing this hobby down. If the market for un-restored antique cars was limited to people who loved working on them, they'd still be affordable to anyone who wanted to get dirty.
  14. I didn't take photos. It was really pretty simple. Heating the cable ends made them removable. Drilling them out was easy as it was only enlarging existing holes slightly. I was fortunate to have a crimper of the right type. The cable ends are mild steel so it doesn't take much pressure. The idea is to turn a cylindrical part into one that's hexagonal in section, and thereby reducing the size of the interior hole and squeezing the cable sufficient to hold it securely. If you know anyone who installs cable type porch and deck railings, they would have the perfect tool for the job. (You cannot use the type of crimper intended for aluminum fittings on wire rope.)
  15. I thought I'd post my experience in hope that it might help someone in the future. I had to replace a broken inner speedometer cable on a 1929 truck. Rather than try to find replacement ends for the cable, I heated the old crimped ones to cherry red, at which point it was possible to pull them off the old broken cable. Then I re-bored them to the correct diameter for a slip fit on the new cable. A very easy job since the holes were already there and centered. I cut the new inner cable to length and used an hydraulic press and hex shaped die to re-crimp the ends. Then I lubricated the cable with graphite, installed it, and it was just like new. It can be challenging to find the right cable ends as well as the right replacement cable for an old vehicle. If you have the old ends, this method permits you to reuse them.