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1927 Buick Roadster - needs adjustment to A-pillar


bpolson
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I'm the happy new owner of a 1927 Buick Master 6 Roadster.  There are a few things that need sorting, and I want to start with the windshield.  The gaps are very different on each side - and I noticed no mounting pad underneath.   Not weatherstripping, but I'm not a worried about that.   Wondering is anyone has a tip on the best way to adjust, if the pad is needed (and where to source).    Currently, the top does not sit on the pins it is so far off - although I don't expect the top to be up often.  Any tips are appreciated.

 

 

 

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The windshield posts may be bent. Also there are to be rubber mounting pads under the posts. Once installed and adjusted it will make a difference.

 Is this car a model 44 or a model 54?  The photo shows all nickel headlight buckets. Typical of model 54 sport roadster. I see the backs of the cowl lights are round like 1928 lights. 

 BOB'S Automobilia #WP-248 $26.50 a pair in 2018.

 Gasket between the cowl and the bottom of the windshield frame.

        //          //             #WS-208 $45.50       2018

 Photos of an original 1927 Model 54 Sport Roadster. With factory original paint colors, Nickle, top and upholstery.

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The Model 54 sport roadster has the windshield post engineered for the wind wing brackets. Not clamped on and are nickel plated.

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Notice the rubber gasket between the window frame and the cowl.DSCF6030.thumb.JPG.071672b81fd94c5f5b27548e0ba9132c.JPG

 This car came with an accessory side mount because it was ordered with a trunk rack.

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Remove the windshield and stick a piece of tape on the cowl in the center, then measure and mark the exact center. Now you can measure from the centerline to the tips of the stanchions on a diagonal and compare measurements.  If they are bent, the measurements will be different.

If they are bent they can be heated and straightened.  My stanchions had been drilled for windwing brackets just like yours have, and I welded the holes closed.  I believe they are cast steel which welded nicely and should also be bend when heated and not break.

If the problem is a misalignment of the support brackets that Rod posted, then a remedy will not be easy.   

Lets first see if the stanchions are the problem.

Also notice the steering wheel is a 1928  - see the scroll in the spoke ?   Its not uncommon to have multiple years parts on our cars. Mine does too.

 

Kevin

 

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17 minutes ago, Oregon Desert model 45 said:

Remove the windshield and stick a piece of tape on the cowl in the center, then measure and mark the exact center. Now you can measure from the centerline to the tips of the stanchions on a diagonal and compare measurements.  If they are bent, the measurements will be different.

If they are bent they can be heated and straightened.  My stanchions had been drilled for windwing brackets just like yours have, and I welded the holes closed.  I believe they are cast steel which welded nicely and should also be bend when heated and not break.

If the problem is a misalignment of the support brackets that Rod posted, then a remedy will not be easy.   

Lets first see if the stanchions are the problem.

Also notice the steering wheel is a 1928  - see the scroll in the spoke ?   Its not uncommon to have multiple years parts on our cars. Mine does too.

 

Kevin

 

Maybe remove the windshield and put a piece of conduit or PVC into the support holes to verify that the supports are correct, then move on to the posts themselves. 

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This support bracket shares 2 fasteners with the upper door hinges in the circled locations.  If this has been misaligned, the door hinges might also show a slight mismatch.   These parts were very tricky to get aligned when I was working on the wood on mine. One side ended up too high and cowl sheetmetal would not fully align with the rest of the body.  

Kevin

 

stanchion support bracket.jpg

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WOW - thanks everyone.   Super helpful tips.   The car is missing the model plate, but it was registered as a 27.    It has rumble seat, golf bag door, and 128" wheel base, so I assume that means it is a 54.    I have little history of the car, but I do know that when it changed from CA to NV registration they changed the registration (VIN) number.   I suppose the year could be wrong year on the registration as well.   Let me know if there is another tell-tale sign of 27 vs. 28.  Sounds like - as Hugh indicates - these are the wrong design A-pillars for the car either way.   I'll probably try to get them straight before I   worry about the hourglass rubber pieces.    I do have a Bob's catalog now, so I think I'm ready to take this on.  Perhaps I'll order a model plate from Bob's as well ...

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Bruce, 

    I retracted my posting because I was showing how the split windshield is installed on a 1925 model, but in your case it is a different set up being a single pane of glass.   Let me know if you want it reposted.  I do not know if your model uses the hourglass weatherstripping on the sides.   I will back add some photos.  If you have the windshield out consider checking if safety glass is in the car.   It is 2 panes of glass with plastic between.  Basically you have 1928 lights and a 1927 grill.  Do you have the serial number from the engine (on a rivetted ID plate near the dip stick) or the chassis number (same kind of riveted ID plate) in the drivers wheel wheel on the frame near where the steering box arm comes out.  Also you may be missing a few windshield pivot parts.   I have not looked if this is the same as 1927, but these are the 1925 windshield pivot parts.   Hugh

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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There are no model plates or plates of any kink on the cowl.   There is a plate on the frame (1712606) inside the passenger front wheel well and a plate on the engine near the steering box (mostly illegible).   Here are some additional pictures as requested.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

 

OK - my pads for the A-pillar (stantions) came yesterday and I put them on.   After that - they were perfect.   Measured true to each other and the center - and fit the board perfectly that goes across the top.   However, the windshield still fit the same.    Measured the windshield itself and ... crap.   Seemed wonky, so I traced it out on a piece of graph paper, carefully noting the center line and keeping things straight.   Spot on the corner is where is 'bangs' against the A pilar.

 

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Then I folded in half, basically confirming my measurement.

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Flipping this over, the other side (non-hatched) shows what needs to be shaved off.

 

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Now, I just need to figure out how to do that.    Suppose a body shop will be able to sort this out?   Any advice is appreciated.

 

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Bruce,   

      You need to determine that your uprights are straight, and that your windsheild frame is "square" as well.   You need to take diagonal measurements of both the windshield frame and the uprights.  Maybe use the pins which hold the side curtains as reference points to check the windshield frame.  These are the red lines.  To check the supports, you may need to make a mark up the side a little, but the same on each side.  I showed this in blue.  Then measure the green diagonal on the uprights to the top corners or somewhere where a good common reference point can be obtained.    The diagonal measurements must match.    

 

Also consider making a cardboard template of each side and take it to the opposite side.  Are they the same?   

 Hugh

 

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My lower windshield frame was bent out on one side - see red arrow.

I traced out the profile on a piece of cardboard, restrained the frame to the workbench on top of the tracing, leaving the bent end free. 

I smacked the bent end with a rubber mallet until it matched the profile from the opposite side.  It might need a little more adjustment, but its close now.

You just need to be careful to not deform the frame anywhere else as it bends quite easily.   If the corner joint cracks in the process of bending, it may need to be welded.

Kevin

bent frame.jpg

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Thanks all.    The A-pillars were off a little before I added the pads.   Now they measure perfect.  Distance at the top is exactly the same as the board in the top - and the diagonal and the distance from the center of the cowl to each tip are all exactly the same.   The window  measures 1 1/4 " different in the diagonals - which I confirmed with the paper cutout.  All a bit hard to communicate, and I'm probably not doing a good job.   One side of the window seems to follows the contour of the a-pillar very well with a consistent gap - although perhaps a bit larger gap than the layouts above.  The other side of the window does not follow the contour at all.  I have no explanation.

 

My frame is a bit different design than the ones shown above - being a 1-piece window.   Seems like I'll need to cut out a section of material, bend, then re-connect, then remeasure.   It might be a job for a body shop at this point.           

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