Oxnard Montalvo

When were Emergency flashers mandated?

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19 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

 

Can anyone remember the last time they NEEDED to use them?

 

Bernie

Picking my daughter and grandsons up at Orlando airport.  There's a spot on the highway just before the airport exit you can park on the side of the road to wait and set the flashers.  It's strange to pull up to this area with all the lights flashing......very convenient though.

Edited by Skyking
Added to wait (see edit history)

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Fascinating. Tomorrow I'm going to check our modern cars and see where the switches are.

 

It's incredibly hard not to write something about putting on the hazard lights and stopping by the airport to pick up a Penny. Good thing I have restraint.

Bernie

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On my CTS (two years old) the four way is on the dash toward center, next to the radio I nicknamed HAL (the computer from the film 2001 A Space Odyssey), that I can not change stations without cursing at it and it has a mind of it's own. Just as distracting to use while driving as a cell phone. I seldom drive the car and I had to search for it

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Straggler ?

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Floridians all know that a "frog strangler" is a torrential downpour of rain. 

 

Frogs are accustomed to knowing where the surface of the water is located, but when it rains hard enough, the location of the surface is no longer apparent, causing the frogs to become disoriented.  Loss of a sense of the location of the water's surface causes the frogs to look upward, mouths agape in wonder.  Of course this then results in large amounts of rain being ingested by the frogs, resulting in frog-strangulation.

 

The rain is not the only hitch in the enjoyment of the Florida motoring experience.  Many frogs are strangled while on our roadways, and the subsequent passage of vehicles creates sort of a frog puree, making the road surface slick and all the more hazardous.

 

Which brings us back to the original question regarding "hazard" flashers.  I don't know about other states, but in the State of Florida, it is illegal to use hazard flashers while one's vehicle is in motion.  I agree that flashing lights are more visible when on a moving vehicle, I'm just tellin' ya the law here in Florida.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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You have heard the term "raining cats and dogs" ? Well in Florida when visibility drops to about 20 feet in sheeting rain that is a "frog strangler" (and a quick Google or Bing would have found it). Usually can see it ahead in time to turm lights, and wipers on. I also have Rain-X in the washer reservoirs & why I traded the OEM Goodyears on my Jeep for Michelins when half worn, started to see the TC light flashing on wet roads. The rules are different here.

 

ps true, improper use of flashers in Florida by anyone not authorized (and those authorized include trash trucks and private security vehicles) to do so is a noncrimiminal, nonmoving traffic violation. However use of a turn signal is permitted to make a turn or to change lanes.

 

pps when hazard flashers were mechanical it made sense to make it an additional function of the turn signal switch on the steering column. Now that evenything is computer controlled, the center of the dash makes sense. 

 

 

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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the four ways were part of the safety components for the 1967  model year. other parts of it were outside rearview mirror, dual master cylinder, collapsing steering column, and flat dash knobs

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I use mine every Tuesday morning when I truck trash up our 700 ft driveway, park in the street, and unload the trash. In PA it is illegal to travel under 40 mph on Interstates without flashers operating.

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Slightly off topic but since everyone is trying to remember when they last used 4-ways..... When I was still in NY the shop that did my trailer inspection pointed out that if you turn on your parking lights and the 4-way flashers you could check all your trailer lights very quickly. Ever since I use that test every time I hook up my trailer.

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In a '68 Charger I used to have in the late 60's, if you turned on the flashers with the ignition off and then turned on the turn signal the radio would play while both were on.  Must have been a  feed-back issue, back feeding the radio through the turn signal switch.  This was an early '68, delivered on December 24, 1967.  It had no shoulder belts or head rests.  Chrysler did not start installing these until the mandated January 1, 1968.  Later I had an early production Mark III (1969) with no head rests.  Ford didn't install these until January 1 either. 

 

From all I can find, the requirement for 4-way flasher came from ASE.  I can find no reference to flashers in the federal requirements.

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Thought the "safety components" appeared earlier usually as options but were required for '68. Big thing I remember about 67s was the motor mount breaking and throttles jamming open on GM cars which led to cable accelerators (instead of rod linkages) and captive motor mounts.

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9 hours ago, padgett said:

Thought the "safety components" appeared earlier usually as options but were required for '68. Big thing I remember about 67s was the motor mount breaking and throttles jamming open on GM cars which led to cable accelerators (instead of rod linkages) and captive motor mounts.

 

The motor mount problem was for several model years, FYI they still had rod linkages for many years after 1967. The cure was a steel cable that wrapped around the motor mount keeping lift limited if the mount separated. I think you have your cables mixed up 

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It appears they were optional on my '66 Impala convertible, but they were bundled in with options like a console and a clock, oddly enough. It uses the big, red under-dash pull switch. You'll also note this car was originally sold in PA, if it matters.

 

flasher1.jpgflasher2.jpg

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)

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28 minutes ago, John348 said:

 

The motor mount problem was for several model years, FYI they still had rod linkages for many years after 1967. The cure was a steel cable that wrapped around the motor mount keeping lift limited if the mount separated. I think you have your cables mixed up 

 

 

My '66 Impala SS427 also has these. There's a booklet of installation instructions with the car and the cables are on the motor mounts and wrapped around the exhaust manifolds. How odd...

 

Cables1.jpgCables2.jpgcables3.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)

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Yes, the cable was the original fix retrofitted to existing cars (so not original but safety related) but later motor mounts had a slot and arm to limit travel if the rubber tore. Had the throttle jam open when the mount broke on my 67 Camaro. And eventually the solid linkage went away (during the 70s, not sure exactly when but pretty sure my 73 Vegas had a cable) & was the final fix. Guess I should have qualified further but never said that was the original cheap kludge.. Geez folks.

 

camaro.jpg

 

ps autocross trophies were a lot smaller than drag strip's.

 

BTW note that the instruction sheet is dated '71

 

pps Guess I better not mention why the "Astro-Ventilation" came to be...

 

ppps anyone know which '67 Camaros had no engine badge ?

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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On ‎6‎/‎13‎/‎2016 at 7:13 PM, 61polara said:

In a '68 Charger I used to have in the late 60's, if you turned on the flashers with the ignition off and then turned on the turn signal the radio would play while both were on.  Must have been a  feed-back issue, back feeding the radio through the turn signal switch.  This was an early '68, delivered on December 24, 1967.  It had no shoulder belts or head rests.  Chrysler did not start installing these until the mandated January 1, 1968.  Later I had an early production Mark III (1969) with no head rests.  Ford didn't install these until January 1 either. 

 

From all I can find, the requirement for 4-way flasher came from ASE.  I can find no reference to flashers in the federal requirements.

On some GM cars like my 76 Olds if you apply the brake pedal and pull the hazard switch the brake lights and the front turn/running lights double filament all go to the bright and stop flashing. and both ft. turn stay on high and do not flash along with the rear. When I first discovered this I was testing the hazard flashers at night while driving and when they went bright the car in front of me pulled over and thought my car was a unmarked police car, at least that's what he said to me. Those front turn signals are high in the grille and amber and very bright.

img_0125.jpg

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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13 hours ago, padgett said:

Thought the "safety components" appeared earlier usually as options but were required for '68. Big thing I remember about 67s was the motor mount breaking and throttles jamming open on GM cars which led to cable accelerators (instead of rod linkages) and captive motor mounts.

It's incredible that GM knew this for years and did nothing about it. I could have killed quite a few people with my 59 Pontiac Catalina. In 1967 I was at a church function one night and afterwards some friends were playing football in the church parking lot . My car was parked on a end space and to my left was the open parking lot where they guys were playing. After I backed out I put the car in drive and turned the wheel all the way to the left and accelerated. At the time this car was running in F stock automatic and would run a consistent 13.91 @ 101-102mph, a 389 Tri-power 4 speed Hydro. Any road the left side motor mount tore apart and the engine torqued up and pull the throttle wide open. The car was a beast, the front wheels felt like they folded under the car, I was standing on the brakes, The front brakes were skidding the tires but at the rear that big 389 had so much torque ( 459 ft. lbs. ) plus it's 3.97 first gear and my street 3.08 Posi the engine still smoked the street tires and the rear brakes wouldn't hold. People outside were jumping out of the way and finally I was able to climb the steering wheel to grab the key and shut it down. My friend sitting next to me was screaming his head off " let me out of this thing!". The funny thing ( if you want to call it funny) is one of my best buds had a 59 Impala with a 348 Tri-power and the same thing happened to him a few months later. FYI, 1959 Pontiac is the first year the engine had  block mounted motor mounts. I can't tell you when GM finally installed a claw in the mount should the rubber mount tear away. I can tell you my 69 H-O LeMans does have the safety devise. 

Anyroad, I sure could have used some EMERGENCY FLASHERS because I was having quite a ride! 

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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On ‎14‎/‎06‎/‎2016 at 7:21 PM, Matt Harwood said:

It appears they were optional on my '66 Impala convertible, but they were bundled in with options like a console and a clock, oddly enough. It uses the big, red under-dash pull switch. You'll also note this car was originally sold in PA, if it matters.

 

flasher1.jpgflasher2.jpg

 

 

That is identical to the Flarestat unit Studebaker used.  It was also mounted below the dash, suspended on a bracket so one pulled it toward oneself to activated them, versus pulling the knob downward as on your Impala.

 

Craig

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My '60 Invicta engine would lay over and pull the throttle wide open, usually under power braking. Once the torque backed off it came down onto the pad and was OK. I could probably uproot the mount of my current '60 today. A potential case of runaway acceleration.

 

Now the really amazing thing is thinking about all those Toyota's that were running out of control all over the united states. Has anyone noticed that company was able to find every single one of the problem cars and fix it. I don't believe there is a remote possibility of picking up the paper and reading about a runaway Toyota today or in the future. Is there an award that can be given to such a diligent company? The problem seemed so pervasive. Maybe a high official should present Japan with an honor for their work.

 

Every single one found and not another incident. If I wasn't naive I'd be suspicious.

 

Bernie

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

My '60 Invicta engine would lay over and pull the throttle wide open, usually under power braking. Once the torque backed off it came down onto the pad and was OK. I could probably uproot the mount of my current '60 today. A potential case of runaway acceleration.

 

Now the really amazing thing is thinking about all those Toyota's that were running out of control all over the united states. Has anyone noticed that company was able to find every single one of the problem cars and fix it. I don't believe there is a remote possibility of picking up the paper and reading about a runaway Toyota today or in the future. Is there an award that can be given to such a diligent company? The problem seemed so pervasive. Maybe a high official should present Japan with an honor for their work.

 

Every single one found and not another incident. If I wasn't naive I'd be suspicious.

 

Bernie

It's not just Toyota that is proactive when it comes to problems and not wanting the situation to get into campaign and recall levels. I have been on many fire alarms in 34 years with a major automotive manufacturer and know it's not just Toyota. On the other hand some companies just let it happen until a acceptable level triggers a response. 

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55 minutes ago, helfen said:

It's not just Toyota that is proactive when it comes to problems and not wanting the situation to get into campaign and recall levels. I have been on many fire alarms in 34 years with a major automotive manufacturer and know it's not just Toyota. On the other hand some companies just let it happen until a acceptable level triggers a response. 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)

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You guys are stirring up memories.  In 1964 I joined a rural volunteer fire department/rescue squad.  Virginia state troopers were still running red emergency lights instead of blue ones.  We mounted blue ones on our private vehicles.  I used a pair of lights of about 5" diameter mounted behind the grille.  I bought a new '65 Impala SS conv.  I discovered it made quite a show at night if I raised the trunk lid when I parked on the side of the road.  With the park lights lit approaching drivers saw red lights behind the car, red lights on top of the car visible from the front and back and two flashing blue lights behind the grille.  Then the state police adopted blue lights and we could no longer use them so we had to replace the blue lens in our lights with red lens.

 

January of 1968 I ordered a new Chrysler convertible.  The dealer told me it would come with shoulder belts because the new safety regulations required them.  I asked him where they would be mounted.  He did not know.  When the car arrived there were no shoulder belts.  The regulation did not apply to convertibles. 

 

The Chrysler had a 440 V-8 that had a habit of quitting when you'd go to pull out from a traffic light or stop sign.  I took it to the shop and they put a de-acceleration valve on the side of the carburetor.  I left the shop headed home and stopped beside a small airport to look at an airplane.  I pulled out and nailed the Chrysler and it took off.  When I let up on the gas it kept accelerating.  At 115 mph I had the presence of mind to turn the ignition off.  Back to the shop I went and they did some adjusting on the de-acceleration valve.  That still did not cure the stalling problem but finally I found a mechanic that did. 

Edited by john2dameron
another thought (see edit history)

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22 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

 

Now the really amazing thing is thinking about all those Toyota's that were running out of control all over the united states. Has anyone noticed that company was able to find every single one of the problem cars and fix it. I don't believe there is a remote possibility of picking up the paper and reading about a runaway Toyota today or in the future. Is there an award that can be given to such a diligent company? The problem seemed so pervasive. Maybe a high official should present Japan with an honor for their work.

 

Every single one found and not another incident. If I wasn't naive I'd be suspicious.

 

Bernie

 

So thoughtful praising a company knowing from the start they had a problem but was afraid of addressing it due to sales and reputation.

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In 1966 Cadillac offered them as an option, not standard. 1967 They became standard equip. I just installed a GM NOS 4-way on mine. Truly plug and play. Even the location was marked on the back of the panel. Wiring harness plugs in between the signal switch and harness. Hardest part was fitting it in the plethora of wires and such (especially the cruise control).

 

20160617_070329.jpg

Edited by Amphicar BUYER (see edit history)
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