Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. DWR46's experience is what i've been hearing about. I, too, live in a rural area. I hope, if they want a confirmation of the serial number, that I can get an officer to come out to my place and sign the paperwork. Maybe, like PP, I'll get lucky and they'll just send me my title. They did recently pass a new law in Illinois that allows you to drive an antique car as many miles as you want from April through September if you pay an additional $45 for your plates. No more restrictions to just club events and shows if you're willing to cough up the extra dough.
  2. I just bought back the first car I ever owned, a 1932 Dodge sedan - yes the actual car, back in my hands after 45 years. I live in Illinois and have been hearing horror stories about registering a pre-1948 car in this state. I never had problems in the past, but that was before a change that was apparently made in 2009. Now peple are complaining about having to bring the car to inspection stations to verify numbers and of the Liiniois Department of Revenue sending out letters demanding taxes on their "idea" of what the vehicle is "actually" worth after you have registered the car and supposedly paid all your fees. They then revoke your license and make you pay all over again for plates and fees after you get the car bonded. Has anyone registered their antique/classic vehicle in the state of Illinois recently, and have you had any problems? My Dodge is arriving from Connecticut with a clear title and a bill of sale next month, and I'm hoping getting a title won't be some sort of nightmare. Thanks in advance for any information on this subject. RT
  3. I haven't seen the car in 45 years. It's being shipped to me next month. I thought I remembered the wheels being welded, but 45 years is a long time and I may be mistaken.
  4. Has anyone ever powder coated a set of wire wheels? I'm trying to decide on paint or powder coat for the (welded) wire wheels on my 1932 Dodge DL. I was wondering if the powder coat could get into all the nooks and crannies that a wire wheel would have. I've often heard that sometimes it's hard to get complete coverage in objects with deep recesses and odd angles. The car will be a driver, not a show car, so I'm looking for looks and durability. Thanks for any advice or suggestions. RT<!-- google_ad_section_end -->
  5. Has anyone ever powder coated a set of wire wheels? I'm trying to decide on paint or powder coat for the (welded) wire wheels on my 1932 Dodge DL. I was wondering if the powder coat could get into all the nooks and crannies that a wire wheel would have. I've often heard that sometimes it's hard to get complete coverage in objects with deep recesses and odd angles. The car will be a driver, not a show car, so I'm looking for looks and durability. Thanks for any advice or suggestions. RT
  6. Going to a new home in Texas.
  7. Car Is Sold Reluctantly selling my 1948 Plymouth P15 Super Deluxe sedan. Selling, only because I found and bought back the first car I ever owned – a 1932 Dodge – so the Plymouth has to go due to lack of garage space. This car has never seen rain or snow in the nine years I’ve owned it. It came from South Carolina and is an original 77,000 mile car. This is a solid car. No rust in the floors, inner or outer rockers. You won’t have to replace the usual Mopar rust outs with this vehicle. this is a nice driver ready for a weekend outing. just turn the key and drive it. Since I have owned the car the following work has been done. New master cylinder New brake hoses New clutch (this year) Rebuilt pressure plate (this year) New throw-out bearing (this year) New rubber brake, clutch and accelerator pedals New rubber steering column pad All new wiring in the original pattern for Rhode Island Wiring Co. Rebuilt starter and generator New voltage regulator NOS Exhaust manifold NOS heat gauge that actually works. Rebuilt all instruments. All work, but the gas gauge is a bit iffy at times. All new knobs for the dash Rebuilt entire front suspension – upper and lower arms, new shocks New rear shocks New WW tires – less than 700 miles Cleaned and flushed engine – all freeze plugs removed and replaced. Water passages thoroughly cleaned Engine cleaned and painted with POR-15 engine paint in the original silver. NOS exhaust manifold with working heat riser New spark plug wires with “waterproof” sealers over the plugs New battery (this week) New battery and ground wires – correct six volt Radiator flushed and pressure tested. New radiator hoses with correct period clamps Firewall and inner fenders repainted Firewall grommets replaced with NOS The car runs perfectly – no smoke, no overheating. It drives great. Cruising speed is a comfortable 55, but you could install an overdrive unit if you want to hit the interstate. Paint is 80% original. It’s a 15 footer with a few nicks and scrapes. No dents or rust holes. Stainless is nice, one or two small dimples that can be taken out easily. The car has two PERFECT lower stainless trim pieces. These are almost impossible to find these days – especially on the passenger side where they usually got crunched by the curb. The bumper chrome is original and presentable, but far from show quality. The pot metal tail lights, door handles and hood ornament have light pitting, but look pretty good. The interior was redone before I bought it. It’s nice, but not in the original pattern. All the lights work Doors open and close solidly. All window glass goes up and down smoothly. New Rebuilt vacuum wiper motor. The car needs: A new speedometer cable New rubber for the front vent (available from Steele) New rubber on the door sills (service available) A new home Price is $6000 firm. You already know I have more than that in it, but I enjoy working on these old cars and I’m not out to make a killing. Just don’t hot rod it. The car is located in Southern Illinois Richard Taylor taylormd@madisontelco.com Cell 314-780-4422 Home 618-635-2444<!-- google_ad_section_end -->
  8. Lots of flat, flat, flat farmland. Cornfields as far as you can see. Hot summers, short, but sometimes cold winters. Plenty of activity in the antique car hobby. I think you'll enjoy it.
  9. This is a nice car that deserves a new home.
  10. As usual I wasn't very clear in my post. The diagram just says "small blue braid." My 48 Plymouth had colored wires that had different colored tracers within the wire. i guess I was confusing "braided" with "tracers." Maybe the 32 used solid colored cloth covered wire with no tracers. Better to wait and see what the original wiring tells me. I really liked the R.I. harness I got for my 48 Plymouth, but I recently helped a friend build his own harness using the plywood and nails method and it came out great. We saved a bundle in the process. I'll still buy the wire and connectors from Rhode Island as they make excellent products.
  11. I don't want to restart a past controversy, but I need new tires and tubes for my 1932 Dodge DL. Any recommendations from someone who has bought tubes in the last two years and had good luck with them. I intend to drive this car and want to be safe.
  12. My "new" 1932 Dodge DL won't arrive for a month or two, but I'm trying to put together a group of parts I want to install once she arrives at her new home, mostly brakes and suspension. But I also want to install all new wiring as the original has the usual case of crumbles after 81 years. Since I can't see the wiring at the moment, the only thing I have to go by is the wiring diagram in the instruction book. It lists all the colors - although I'm not sure what "black braid" means - but only lists the wire size as "small" and "medium." Would anyone out there happen to know what the gauge sizes are for small and meduim? Rhode Island Wiring has 18 through 8 gauge wire in what appears to be all the colors I need. The other question is the diagram says "Small Blue Braid," "Medium Green Braid," and so on. Does anyone know if this is a blue wire and a green wire with a black braid, or...? I know Rhode Island makes up nice harnesses - I used one on my 48 Plymouth - but I want to save a few bucks and try to make one myself this time. I know I should probably just wait until the car arrives but I'm just an impatient kind of guy.
  13. This would make a nice winter project if you have a business coupe.
  14. I have the front cowl, both doors and the rear convertible section from a 49 Wayfarer convertible. The doors have roll up windows. The bottom 8 inches of both doors and the cowl are thin, but the rest of the metal is solid. the doors have the glass and the hard to find curved stainless frames and vent windows. I have two doors from a Wayfarer Sedan that are identical from the beltline down and are solid if you wanted to graft them together. You also get a complete top mechanism -one brace needs to be welded together, but it's all there and in good shape. And you get the X-brace from the convertible frame and the dashboard - which is not welded in like many convertibles. This would convert a Wayfarer Business Coupe into a convertible. $1200 Everything will fit in a pickup with no problem. I can take more detailed pictures if you need them. Richard Taylor taylormd@madisontelco.com 618-635-2444 Home 314-780-4422 Cell
  15. SOLDReluctantly selling my 1948 Plymouth P15 Super Deluxe sedan. Selling, only because I found and bought back the first car I ever owned – a 1932 Dodge – so the Plymouth has to go due to lack of garage space. This car has never seen rain or snow in the seven years I’ve owned it. It came from South Carolina and is an original 77,000 mile car. This is a solid car. No rust in the floors, inner or outer rockers. You won’t have to replace the usual Mopar rust outs with this vehicle. this is a nice driver ready for a weekend outing. just turn the key and drive it. Since I have owned the car the following work has been done. New master cylinder New brake hoses New clutch (this year) Rebuilt pressure plate (this year) New throw-out bearing (this year) New rubber brake, clutch and accelerator pedals New rubber steering column pad All new wiring in the original pattern for Rhode Island Wiring Co. Rebuilt starter and generator New voltage regulator NOS heat gauge that actually works. Rebuilt all instruments. All work, but the gas gauge is a bit iffy at times. All new knobs for the dash Rebuilt entire front suspension – upper and lower arms, new shocks New rear shocks New WW tires – less than 700 miles Cleaned and flushed engine – all freeze plugs removed and replaced. Water passages thoroughly cleaned Engine cleaned and painted with POR-15 engine paint in the original silver. NOS exhaust manifold with working heat riser New spark plug wires with “waterproof” sealers over the plugs New battery (this week) New battery and ground wires – correct six volt Radiator flushed and pressure tested. New radiator hoses with correct period clamps Firewall and inner fenders repainted Firewall grommets replaced with NOS The car runs perfectly – no smoke, no overheating. It drives great. Cruising speed is a comfortable 55, but you could install an overdrive unit if you want to hit the interstate. Paint is 80% original. It’s a15 footer with a few nicks and scrapes. No dents or rust holes. Stainless is nice, one or two small dimples that can be taken out easily. The car has two PERFECT lower stainless trim pieces. These are almost impossible to find these days – especially on the passenger side where they usually got crunched by the curb. The bumper chrome is original and presentable, but far from show quality. The pot metal tail lights, door handles and hood ornament have light pitting, but look pretty good. The interior was redone before I bought it. It’s nice, but not in the original pattern. All the lights work Doors open and close solidly. All window glass goes up and down smoothly. New Rebuilt vacuum wiper motor. The car needs: A new speedometer cable New rubber for the front vent (available from Steele) New rubber on the door sills (service available) A new home Price is $6000 firm. You already know I have more than that in it, but I enjoy working on these old cars and I’m not out to make a killing. Just don’t hot rod it. The car is located in Southern Illinois Richard Taylor taylormd@madisontelco.com Cell 314-780-4422 Home 618-635-2444
  16. I'm not sure. I'm just getting started on this car and haven't done enough research. Perhaps someone else on the forum knows. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  17. Looking for two front fenders for a 1932 dodge DL six. Side mounts preferred, but I'll take anything. Please note the desperation evident in this post. I wouldn't mind looking at a rear driver's side fender either. Also need a long tail light stalk and a tail light. Not asking for much, huh? I know how rare these cars are, but I'm trying to get the Dodge - my first car that I just bought back from fellow member Phil 32DL6 after 45 years - on the road in time for Auburn Hills in 2014. Any help or leads greatly appreciated. Richard Taylor taylormd@madisontelco.com 618-635-2444 <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  18. Thanks, Phil. Let's hope between the two of us we didn't wear them out. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>
  19. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>Looking for two front fenders for a 1932 dodge DL six. Sidemounts preferred, but I'll take anything. Please note the desperation evident in this post. I wouldn't mind looking at a rear driver's side either. Richard Taylor taylormd@madisontelco.com 618-635-2444
  20. I'm afraid I already know the answer to this question, due to the lack of any bearings being listed before 1933, but when did the Dodge six change from babbit to insert bearings?
  21. No second thoughts, please. I've been haunted for 45 years. Now it's your turn.
  22. You would have been right. Take it from someone who knows.