rodneybeauchamp

Intermittent turn signal indication at dashboard

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Bob,

 

Well done. Glad you perservered and fixed it.

 

Classic Car Wiring does a 63 Riviera laminated coloured wiring diagram that is large and easier to follow that the OEM manual. I have used mine a few times to help determine what goes where and consider it a good investment.

 

cheers

Rodney

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Rodney, you and I are working on the same vacuum system project at the same time. I have a63. 

I have a pro mechanic heading up the project in my carriage house ( I describe my new garage as the carriage house because local government told I had to build at least 200 feet away from my back door)

i will keep you apprised of the development and pictures. We intend to check for vacuum leaks. All new color coded vacuum hoses as well as a vacuum reservoir with check valve have been purchased. I'm waiting for the new replacement vacuum actuator to come via small parcel delivery. In the mean time I'm tracking diagrams I'll post. 

RedRivieraBob (RRB)

the pics will come in another post.

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On 8/10/2017 at 6:20 PM, 1965rivgs said:

Hi Bob,

  Do you have rear brake lights with the headlights on? Probably not....

  Both filaments in the rear bulbs are sharing the same path to ground. Generally, when one filament, in this case the brake/turn filament, is affected by operation of another filament, in this case the tailight filament, there is a problem with the available ground because both filaments are "competing" for the same ground. So, in this example, because the tailight filament is "using" the available ground there is not enough ground left for the brake/turn filament to light.

Your tailight sockets are grounded to the BODY. You do not describe a good body ground? The factory used braided ground straps between the engine head bolts and the firewall. Often these are missing due to sloppy assembly of engine work or need to be cleaned due to engine paint, etc...do you have a good body ground? Although there are many unintended ground paths like accelerator linkage, etc the body is mounted with rubber insulators which can isolate the body from battery ground.

Now that you are familiar with the use of a test light you should check to see if you have turn signal voltage at the socket assemblies. If so...

You could try running a temporary ground directly from the neg battery post to one of your taillight sockets to be absolutely sure you have adequate ground at the sockets to fire the brake/turn filament.

  Tom

PS The above is assuming one or both of the sockets has been wired properly. When folks start snippin` and splicin` anything is possible!

Tom, again-you hit the nail on the head " assuming one or both ( of the sockets ) are wired properly. "That was my failure. I did not know how to wire the sockets. My ASSUMPTION , was baseless, the wiring of the socket was inconsequential.  I finally made the correction on your note as well as a reminder from 60FlatTop to make sure the sockets were wired right. I felt foolish when I learned my mistake. I knew the answer was a simple answer, but the answer would be tedious. We prevailed. The lights work. Again, many thanks.

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Concept and details, they need to come together for success. I have a little problem this week. The yellow wire broke off my Riviera alternator pug on Tuesday. I have extra spade terminals with the clip back. I have the terminal removal tool and a pair of pliers just right for folding the tabs over the insulation and the wire to install the new terminal. My right hand works fine for the pliers. My thumb and first two fingers of my left hand won't hold the wire and small parts together so I can attach the terminal. Now that's a ten minute job I have been farting around with since Tuesday. I'm heading back out there in a few minutes. If I don't get it this time the neighborhood feral cats are in big trouble.

I will prevail.

 

Bernie

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Persistence and resilience will take you all the way. Sometimes I make a tool to hold objects when I'm working by myself. I'm not familiar with the chore. I'm going to the carriage house to see if I can replicate your task.

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If you have AC you have to monkey around the compressor and added brackets. I was going to suggest you use the little finger and ring finger on your left hand to manipulate. ( guitarist use all their fingers pretty good, but not on car repairs). I always look to a friendly neighbor or any friend, spouse, nephew, whomever to help when I've over done it already.

self reliance is great, but sometimes we need to ask for help.

RRB

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On 7/17/2017 at 10:38 PM, KongaMan said:

WD-40 is not a fix.  For anything.

Mr Konga Man, in the 60's I was told WD 40 was good for freeing up rusty nuts and bolts. 50 years later I learn I was wrong. Now I use  PB blaster to free up rusty nuts and bolts. If, worse comes to worse I use my Torch cart to get er done. ( I use the torch as safe as possible). WD 40 is good for lubricating and mosquito bites.

RRB

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