kingrudy

Members
  • Content count

    115
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by kingrudy

  1. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    The pictures below are when I purchased the car in 2009 a short distance from my house in Southern California. I had a new radiator put in the car, new brakes, tune up and generally checked all of the mechanical systems. Then I mad my first mistake, I took the car to a shop that was recommended by someone to have the car given a body on restoration. Six years later I got most of the car back and I am doing all of the work that I can (a lot of money has been spent on very poor work) to get this car on the road. I am starting from the front of the car and working my way to the rear, having to do several things over again that weren't done to what I consider acceptable standards. Some parts that I did not receive and still looking for are: rear gravel guard, wiper linkage, lever assembly for cowl vent, door lock mechanism (passengers side), upper trunk guide, steering column support and steering column floor plate. The third picture is how the car looks today. I will post additional pictures as work progresses. Mike
  2. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Yesterday and today worked on the floor. On the drivers side and passengers side there were four u bolts that secured the seat belts. The two easy ones closest to the door were taken out long ago. The two nearest to the center of the car needed to be removed (new seat belts will be added later). One side of the u bolt was three inches long??? The other side was only one inch as it ended right above a cross member. Both were a mother to get out with a sawzall and a box ratchet. I put bolts in place of the u bolts as a temporary measure until the new seat belts are purchased. Took a wire brush to the floors to get them as clean as possible, washed them with soap and hot water (probably not done in 79 years). There was a little surface rust near the back seat, so I used a rust reformer (Rustoleum) on these spots, sheet metal was solid, as the car spent it's whole life in Southern California. The last picture shows the final product after rolling on the Rustoleum gloss black enamel. I will let this set up for two days and then see what can be done on the cowl.
  3. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Today I got the dash completed (sort of) and got the two most important things, the lights and the ignition switch. The first illustration shows the key position (start) to the lock and remove the cylinder. On the second picture (taken while lying on my back under the ignition switch) notice the blue circle.The screw is located at about the 4:30 position when you are facing the dash. This screw holds the switch in place, it also makes sure that when you put the key and the face plate together, that the key will correspond to the positions in the first illustration. I took some extra time on this to make sure that the switch turned freely (if it doesn't, the car won't start). Place the plastic piece on next and secure this with the small screw on the bottom is the switch. The light switch is held in place by a male screw on the outside of the face plate and an Allen screw that secures the plastic pull to the shaft of the light switch. I know that when this is complete that I will have to go back and replace the plastic pieces, but that is not my priority. Right now I am trying to knock down the large projects and I'll do a punch list at the end. The dash is complete for the most part, I still have to put the windshield wiper switch in, no big deal. I went to pick up all of the material for sealing the floor, will start on this in the morning.
  4. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    I'm hoping so.
  5. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    It was a good day, the left side of the steering column is complete and all wiring is done. On the right side the enclosure for the ignition switch, light switch and choke was installed and the dash should be finished off. The two screws that secure engine turned portion to the dash were quite a challenge, one hand behind the dash and completely by feel alone. I still have to put the light in the glove box and the light for the clock. When I get the proper light sockets for this hopefully I will have a solution for the switch that makes the light come on when the glove box door is opened. The picture to the far right is of the seat brackets. I put them in some Evap-o-Rust over night and gave them a wire wheel treatment. Then I gave them a coat of primer and will add a coat of gloss black tomorrow. Looking ahead, after the dash is complete, I will give the floor the same treatment that I did in the trunk with a coat of primer and a coat of gloss black.
  6. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    I was studying Gary W's post on finishing off his clock and lamp install on his glove box and it gave me some ideas and more questions. If you go to his post "37 model 48 restoration on page 26 he describes the mechanism for making the light come on when the glove box is open. I am a bit confused by this, it seems as though it is part of the lamp, I have to read this again and maybe it will sink in.
  7. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Hello Ken, Thanks for the information, I do not have this clip. It appears as thought it is part of the the wiring harness that connects to the instrument switch on one end and the clock on the other. My original thought was that this clip attaches to the glove box door hinge on the left hand side. It appears as though this not only makes the installation neater, but also serves as a ground. I very well may be looking for an aftermarket clip that at least finishes off the install. There is a ground wire that attaches to the clock.
  8. Beautiful car, someone will be very fortunate have her. Mike
  9. kingrudy

    1940 Buick Super Touring Sedan

    No doubt, this is a beautiful looking car. Good luck finding her a new home. Mike
  10. kingrudy

    63 buick riviera for sale $10,000.00 OBO

    Hello Brandon, Try taking some pictures of your car and sending them to your email address, then saving them to documents. This has worked for me. Good luck with the Riv. Mike
  11. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Today I decided to put on the glove box door and to install the glove box. I really thought that I was going to have an easy day, well I was wrong again. I started by putting the glove box in first, that seemed logical. I carefully put the u clips on the box taping the material with masking tape so when I put the clips on it wouldn't shred the cloth liner. The right side of the box went smoothly, but the left side took some massaging to get everything tucked in right. Next I tried to put the door on, you can't make any adjustments to the hinges once the glove box is in. So, take the door off, pull the box out and start over. Put the door on and line everything up (make sure it closes and latches). This was a bit of a challenge, but most of the car has been. I tried using the bumpers that I bought at Bob's, but the door would not latch even after several adjustment to the latch. Now put the glove box in and fasten all trim screws. Small hole on the left side of the box is just large enough to bring the braided loom for the clock and the light for the glove compartment. Tomorrow I will wire the clock and connect the wires on the other end to the instrument switch. When I work on the clock, I will refer the the third image below.
  12. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    After my study day, I worked on the instrument switch and light switch. If I had worked on this from the start (seven years ago). This would have been much easier, as the wiring was all numbered real well and everything matched with the wiring diagram in the Buick manual plus the hand drawn diagrams really helped. The problem came in when the numbers were removed from the wires, or were worn to a point where they could no longer be read. At times a wire would exit a loom without a number and I used a wire tracer to tone it out to locate the other end of the wire. At other times I used a wiggy to test for continuity (such as the #12 wire that exited the loom in the trunk next to the tail light). The instrument has six connections and two fuses. I thought it would be a good idea to make notes stating what the wire colors were and where they were going, as some of the numbers were missing. Two connections come from the light switch, one to each end of the fuse. One connection goes to the dash lights and one to the map light above the ignition switch. Two wires go the the clock and light for the clock with a split for the switch that operated the glove box light ( still working on what the switch looks like and how to mount it. Any suggestions). Another wire goes to the light for the ash tray. I would love to do three or four more of these to get more comfortable with this (just kidding). Working as a volunteer at the hospital today, so I will be back on this tomorrow.
  13. kingrudy

    1953 Buick 2dr hardtop for parts

    Please see my post regarding the bayonet terminal located behind the cigar lighter. Does this car still have that part? Thanks, Mike
  14. The bayonet terminal was made to attach to the rear of the cigar lighter fuse on Buick's from 1938 through 1953. I have looked at several sites with no success. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Mike
  15. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    I took a break yesterday and went through the last box of stuff from the shop that did some work on my car. I found more parts for the wiring harness (I thought I was close to being finished), including the fuse assembly for the cigar lighter (see illustration from shop manual and part). Bob's shows this part in the catalog, but when I called him he stated, "sell when I get 'em, but don't have 'em now and nobody makes 'em".I called before I found this part and have no idea where it came from. Now I need to find the bayonet terminal. Called YnZ customer service yesterday and they are very knowledgeable and willing to spend as much time with you as you need to answer any questions. I also spoke to the customer rep about the wiring from the instrument light switch to the instrument lights being very short. He said that he would make a note in their files to make this a couple inches longer. There is a bulb right above the steering column that snaps into the speedometer housing and this gave me quite a fight. While I was taking a break from my frustration with the wiring harness, I showed the jack and lug wrench a bit of love. I sanded all with a 1000 grit sand paper then used a rattle can to hit it with two coats of gloss black and one coat of clear. I have enough material left from doing the trunk to make a small cloth case so they will not rattle around in the back of the car. I will declare this a study day, to see what loose ends are needed to finish up the wiring, also a garage cleanup day.
  16. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Rough day, I started on the electrical most of which is complete. I got a copy of the wiring harness instructions from Y n Z as I had purchased this from them seven years ago. I also have the repair manual, so between the two I was pretty confident. The car runs and all of the running lights, stop lights, head lights, turn signals etc. work. The dome light was never wired, dash lights, cigar lighter and glove box lights were not done. The wiring harness does not provide for these as best as I can figure. So after doing much homework on what was done and what needs to be done, I will pick out the appropriate color 16 gauge wire and start putting it together tomorrow.
  17. kingrudy

    1940 76C

    Ken, glad to see your post is back. I've enjoyed watching the progress of your car. Mike
  18. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    The trunk is very close to completion, today I will finish the tool compartment cover and do some work on the mat which the spare tire sits on. When I started this project the only pictures that I had to draw from were from Ken Green and a picture from the 1940 Buick sales brochure. I did extensive research to find photos of a finished trunk from this year and there just is not a lot of information. So it came down to forensic research and letting the car talk to me to figure out what had been there in 1940 when it came off the line. There is a compartment that is located right behind the rear seat that had the original material in it (see below). While the fabric was soiled, it was in tact with a layer of burlap underneath and insulation beneath that to provide some sound insulation over the differential (I'm guessing). I was told that the car did not have side panels in the trunk, but the car told me something different when I noticed the tabs on the trunk support (both sides). So my conclusion was, against my wife's statement "it's just a trunk" that I needed to forge ahead and do this right. To begin with I started with the back of the rear seat. I used the existing 1" strips that run vertically and the metal strip at the top of the trunk (where many of us in our youth mounted a speaker) to secure the material. The bottom of the material is secured by the 1" strip that holds the lid for the small compartment at the very rear of the trunk. The lid of the compartment was wrapped in fabric and fastened with 1/4" staples underneath. The next step was to make templates for the front and rear sides. The most difficult was the front, as I had to fasten a piece of cardboard to the horizontal brace that begins at the back of the rear seat and ends at the trunk lid support. Then use a compass to trace the curve of the rear of the car onto the cardboard (lots of patience needed here). The bottom of the template I made 1" below the compartment lid, so this section did not need to be exact, but there is a metal strip 2" wide that separates the compartment from the rest of the trunk, so this had to be notched and back to the compass to trace the bottom of this section. The next section, shown on June 12 was an easy one except the upper front of this section is not defined. So there is a small strip of metal that separates the spare tire area from the tool compartment. I figured that when the cover for the tool compartment needs to be removed it cannot interfere with the side panel. So I stopped the side panel just short of that strip. I then broke out the compass again to trace the upper section curve as it slopes down to the tool compartment on a piece of cardboard that I fastened to the tabs on the trunk support. The bottom was done in the same way and it curves a bit downward and then slopes to the tool compartment. I completed this by cutting two pieces of 3/4 plywood to length and drilling them for the appropriate sheet metal screws and machine screws, then wrapping them with fabric I was puzzled as to what kind of material to use for backing, so I visited an upholstery shop down the road and spoke to the owner, James. James showed me some 1/8" plastic which could be painted, cut with a jig saw, sanded, bent and was waterproof. This was the answer to my dilemma. I purchased two 4' x 8' sheets and used all of one sheet and a little of the second. I will use the rest for the kick panels inside the car. I cut out the templates out of the 1/8" plastic and stapled the fabric on the back side. I considered using spray adhesive, but it is messy if you are not real careful, so I fastened the fabric by wrapping it around the plastic pieces and stapling on the back side. Installation of the panels went smoothly except the back edge of the front panel and the upper front edge of the back panel. There is no where that I could find to secure these points. The car had stopped talking to me at this point, so I improvised. Using the horizontal support that originates at the trunk support I fastened velcro at the edge closest to the back seat and pressed this in place. For the pieces closest to the tool compartment I fastened one small piece of velcro at the upper corner closest to the rear of the car.
  19. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    I will post the conclusion of my trunk restoration tomorrow, but I had to share my good fortune of acquiring two vent regulators off of ebay. See the photos below, both regulators appear to be new old stock. I don't think either of them have ever been installed in a vehicle. The seller of these parts stated that he bought them some time ago for his LeSalle and no longer needs them . The regulators were produced from 1937 through 1948 for Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Chevrolet and Cadillac and are made of pot metal, so they are prone to failure if someone tries to open the vent without disengaging the latch. The part numbers are an exact match to mine T-77123 and T-77122. I am very close to having all of the parts for this car, finally!
  20. kingrudy

    1940 Buick 56s parts wanted

    Looking for the trunk latching mechanism for a 1940 model 56, or 76 either will work. I'm not sure if the sedan mechanism will work. Also looking for the fender brackets that are attached to the cowl and fender adjacent to the nameplate. Also looking for the female part of the cigar lighter (all models of this year). Thanks, Mike
  21. kingrudy

    1940 Buick 56s parts wanted

    Found all parts. Thanks, Mike
  22. kingrudy

    Neil's '41 Super Model 51

    Looks great Neil, I have to do mine at some point and I very well may take your lead with the new fiber board.
  23. kingrudy

    248 spark plug cover

    Could you PM some additional pictures, front and back? Thanks, Mike
  24. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    This is the last template, very close to being finished. Note the two tabs on the support for the trunk lift and there are two additional tabs on the floor of the trunk near the wood covering the tool compartment. I found an upholstery vendor near by and I will buy the backing from him at the end of the week.
  25. kingrudy

    My long build of a 1940 56S

    Thanks for the reply John, I am going to forge ahead with this plan. I have searched the web for trunk pictures from this era with very little luck. I will follow your advice and try to contact an upholstery shop for the panel material. I found one place online, but it looks like they want to sell a minimum of four sheets. I figure one sheet should do it. Mike